American Heritage Magazine

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ISSUE
CONTENTS
QTY.
PRICE
PAYPAL
April / May
1980
Letter From The Editor (Courtesy and calumny); The First Hurrah (Presidential candidates were far too dignified to plunge into personal campaigning until William Jennings Bryan changed everything in 1896); "American Art Really Exists" (The story behind the Metropolitan Museum's new and dazzling American Whig); The American Wing's Fifteen Finest (A portfolio); Sigmund Freud's Sortie To America (How the Father of Psychoanalysis spread his gospel to the New World); Landliners (The apotheosis of the motor coach); The Revolution Remembered (Newly discovered reminiscences by the men and women who won our Independence); Out Of This World (The Shakers as a nineteenth-century tourist attraction); An Artist Among The Shakers (A portfolio of watercolors by Benson John Lossing); American Characters (William A. Brady); Hellen Keller - Movie Star (A strange episode in a great career); Freezing Time (The Klondike photographs of Clarke and Clarence Kinsey); A Heritage Preserved (Listening: Andersonville); The Philadelphia Ladies Association (Although it has been disparaged as "General Washington's Sewing Circle," this venture was the first nationwide female organization in America); Good Reading (Books we think you'll like); Readers' Album (Brim trims and Timothy redux); Postscripts
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April / May
1981
Letter From The Editor (Flap); Memories Of Peace And War (An exclusive interview with General Maxwell D. Taylor); Patchwork Primitives (The surprising paintings of Jean Lipman); Now And Then (The American Dream); Explosion In The Magic Valley (The photographic record of a Western success story); A Heritage Preserved (Rescuing the first resource); The Newburgh Conspiracy (Only the harried commamder of the Continental Army stood between mutiny and the most important principle of the infant nation - the supremecy of civilian rule); American Characters (George Labram); William Randolph Hearst's Monastery (He could build castles at his whim, but the ancient home of a small band of monks defeated him); Yankee Tarzan (When Joseph Knowles stripped to the buff and slipped into the Maine woods in 1913, he hoped to lead the nation back to nature); After The Air Raids (An insider's account of a startling - and still controversial - investigation of the Allied bombing of Germany); The Central Park (The miraculous birth - and still more miraculous survival - of Manhattan's most precious acreage); The Painter's Park (A portfolio); Lord Bryce (Few men - foreign or native born - have ever understood us better than this infinitely curious, inveterate visitor from England); Making History (An interview with C. Vann Woodward); Readers' Album (Errand of mirth); Postscripts
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December
1989
Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of H.L. Mencken); The Business Of America (Mephistopheles of Wall Street); In The News (The wrongdoers); American Made (The Carrig-Rohane frame); History Happened Here (Newport in winter); The Time Machine; A Brush With History (A special section on the thirty-fifth anniversary of this magazine); Out Of The Blue (Waiting for the Graf Zeppelin, 1929); Once In A Lilfetime (Contributions by Gerald Carson, Allen F. Davis, Silvio A. Bedini, George Wilson Pierson, Barbara Gelb, Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., Richard M. Ketchum, Robert Heilbroner, Marcus Cunliffe, Herbert Mitgang, Walter Lord, John Kenneth Galbraith, Liz Smith, Mario Puzo, Thomas P. Hughes, Henry F. Graff, Thomas Fleming, Stephen E. Ambrose, William F. Buckley, Jr., Walter D. Edmonds, Louis Auchincloss, Samuel S. Vaughan, Barbara Goldsmith, Richard D. Challener, John Mack Carter, Alan Brinkley, William E. Leuchtenburg, Garry Wills, Philip Kunhardt, Diane Ravitch, Nicholas Lemann, David M. Kennedy, James A. Michener, Michael Korda, Frederik Pohl, Daniel Aaron, John Chancellor and John Lukacs); Triumph And Tragedy (In 1945 the villain had a face that was yet to become familiar); The Winter Art Show (Paintings of historical interest that for one reason or another didn't make it into the magazine this year); When Our Ancestors Became Us (In 1820 their daily existence was practically miedieval; thirty years later many of them were living the modern life); "Everybody Likes Italian Food" (The rise of American's favorite ethnic fare from spaghetti and a red checked tablecloth to carpaccio and fine bone china); Editors' Bookshelf
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February
1990
Letter from The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Fiorello La Guardia); The Business Of America (Technology transfer); In The News (The hostage rescue: 1796); American Made (Game boards); History Happened Here (Fort Worth); The Time Machine; "I Had Prayed To God That This Thing Was Fiction" (He didn't want the job but felt he should do it. For the first time, the soldier who tracked down the My Lai story for the office of the inspector general in 1969 tells what it was like to do some of this era's grimmest detective work); Footnotes To History (Not every memorable historical moment is on a grand scale. Here, one of the finest satirical artists working today takes a look at some of the bizarre, true sidelights that add sparkle to the larger picture); The Public Schools And The Public Mood (Since the birth of the nation, the public's perception of the quality of public schools has swung from approval to dismay and back again. An eminent historian traces the course of school reform and finds that neither conservative nor liberal movements ever fully achieve their aims - which may be just as well); My Grandfather, The Mormon Apostle (In this family narrative the author follows the path his grandfather took from a dangerous and dramatic youth to the highest echelons of the Mormon Church); Thomas Gilcrease And The Western Museum (Creek Indian number 1501's art collection in Tulsa is a great monument to the American West and his people's place in it); Postscripts To History (George Washington's greatest living biographer examines some myths about the first President); Editors' Bookshelf; Readers' Album
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April
1990
Letter From The President; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Henry the Kid); The Business Of America (The revenge of the trust); In The News (The plan the East rejected); My Brush With History (What Eisenhower really said and other recollections); American Made (A Greene and Greene chair); History Happened Here (Sailing north); The Time Machine; Hunting Buffalo (A novelist turned compulsive traveler tracks a peculiar quarry all across America); The Powder Maker's Garden (When Pierre S. du Pont bought the deteriorated Longwood Gardens in 1906, he thought that owning property was a sign of mental derangement. Still, he worked hard to create a stupendous fantasy garden, a place, he said "where I can entertain my friends."); The Real Gold At Bodie (The author leads a search for hidden treasure in the amazingly complete documentary history of a California ghost town - the greatest of them all); Cather Country (A tour around Red Cloud, Nebraska, where the writer Willa Cather llived for seven years of her childhood, confirms the prairie's continuing power to disturb and inspire); School For Sailors (A novelist and historian takes us on a tour of the Academy at Annapolis, where American history encompasses the history of the world); Return To East Anglia (It is to the U.S. Air Force what Normandy is the U.S. Army. The monuments are harder to find, but if you're willing to leave the main roads, you will discover a green and pleasant land still eloquent of one of the greatest military efforts in history); Editors' Bookshelf
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May / June
1990
Letters To The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Dorothy Thompson); The Business Of America (The other Sherman's legacy); In The News (Did Prohibition fail? Reflections on the dry season); My Brush With History (When the Russians moved west); American Made (A Stiegel flask); History Happened Here (Las Vegas: an oasis); The Time Machine; A Visit With LBJ (An hour and a half of growing astonishment in how the presence of the President of the United States, as recorded by a witness who now publishes a record of it for the first time); Stalking The Animals (Some of the most compelling subjects in American sculpture aren't statesmen, or generals, or nudes - in fact, they aren't even human); Shell Shock (Time after time in this troubled century, our whole society has made itself forget about the terrible, invisible battle wounds once known as shell shock, later as combat fatigue, and now as PTSD - posttraumatic stress disorder); The Tropical Twenties (The shady courtyards, tiled roofs and white stucco walls of 1920s Palm Beach owed something to the style of the Spanish Renaissance and everything to the vision of Addison Mizner); The Road To The Future (Fifty years ago the builders of the Pennsylvania Turnpike completed America's first superhighway - and helped determine the shape of travel to come. But this superb piece of engineering was built largely on the roadbed of a railroad abandoned in the nineteenth century); Stamp Act (Around 1900, American Bank Note Company employees were set to work creating collages out of the stamps and currency the firm printed. The results were spectacular enough to fetch more than half a million dollars at auction not long ago); Editors' Bookshelf
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September / October
1990
Correspondence; Letter From The Editor; The Life And Times (Of Samuel Clemens); The Business Of America (Rodgers & Hammerstein, Inc.); In The News (Credit and discredit); My Brush With History (The China Clipper); American Made (A Charleston rice-post bed); History Happened Here (New Castle-on-Delaware); The Time Machine; The Power Of Patents (For two hundred years the United States patent system has defined what is an invention and protected, enriched and befuddled inventors. As a tool of corporate growth in a global economy, it is now more important than ever); Why Benedict Arnold Did It (He marched his men to battle in the first hours of the war and quickly showed himself to be among the finest of the Continental commanders. America's most infamous traitor could have been remembered as one of the great heroes of the Revolution - and in fact to the end of his life that's just what Benedict Arnold believed he was); The Country Club (It has been with us for a century now, a haven to some, an outrage to others, often a bastion of snobbery, and perhaps the only nineteenth-century social institution to have carried on so vigorously long after the world of its founding gentry disappeared); "The Great Arrogance Of The Present Is To Forget The Intelligence Of The Past" (The maker of a fine documentary on the Civil War tells how the medium of film can evoke the emotional reality of history); Grand Illusions (For one exhuberant decade John Eberson built "atmospheric theaters" that were part architectural history, part circus, and wholly enchanting to the audiences that sat beneath their starry ceilings); Editors' Bookshelf
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November
1990
Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Grant and Sherman: "We are as brothers."); The Business Of America (Real estate: where and when); In The News (The flap over the flag); My Brush With History (The day Babe Ruth called his shot); American Made (A Rockwood tile); History Happened Here (Visiting Henry Ford's mind); The Time Machine; Connecting With Eastern Europe (Americans have always sympathized wilth the Eastern European countries in their struggles for democracy, but for two centuries we haven't been able to help much. Do we hava a chance now? A distinguished expatriate looks at the odds); How British Are You? (Very. The legacy of British traits in America is deeper and more significiant than we knew. The author of a controversial new book explains how ancient patterns of life in Shropshire and the Midlands have continued to influence the way we live our lives and see our world); From The Greek (In its majesty and in its simplicity, the Greek revival house seemed to exho America's belief in the past and hopes for the future); What Does History Have To Say About The Persian Gulf? (From the moment Saddam Hussein rolled over Kuwait, people have been trying to read the future in the Middle East by looking to the past. No recent crisis has produced more historical analagies - are we facing another Munich? A Gulf of Tonkin? A historian examines the record); Bennington Preserved (Since the camera first opened its eye on America, a succession of four superb photographers has been busy in one town. Good luck and a determined woman saved their record of a historic era in Vermont); Readers' Album; Editors' Bookshelf
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April
1991
Letter From The Editors; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Henry Morton Stanley); The Business Of America (The American game); In The News (How we go to war); History Happened Here (Following a train to sea); American Made (Pairpoint table lamp); My Brush With History ("...and justice for all."); The Time Machine; Links With History (More than any other game, golf is played with a sense of tradition); Billy The Kid Country (His legend belongs to the whole world now. But to find the grinning boy who gave rise to it, you must visit New Mexico); An Unofficial Tour Of Yale (A lilvely intimate, and idiosyncratilc ramble across one campus and three countries); The Traveler's Bible (How two drummers made a spiritual mark on hotels worldwide); The Double Life Of Hot Springs (For a century and a half, it has been both a lavish spa and an infirmary); Nicknames On The Land ("Welcome to the City of Cheese, Chairs, Children, and Churches); Loyalist Refuge (When their side lost the Revolution, New Englanders who had backed Britain sailed north to New Brunswick and founded a town that still flourishes); The Day Wall Street Turned Into Orchard Street (As long as there have been bankers and brokers, there have been people asking what would happen if they had to earn an honest living); Then And Now (In pictures); Editors' Bookshelf
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May / June
1991
Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Elisha Hunt Rhodes); The Business Of America (The other great depression); In The News (Seeking a real tax revolt); History Happened Here (Wyoming safari); American Made (The gas range); My Brush With History (Not right for the part); The Time Machine; Are We Really Going The Way Of The British Empire? (Those who believe America's power is on the wane look to the example of Britain's shockingly quick collapse. But the similarities may be less alarming than they seem); Getting Right With Robert E. Lee (By the turn of the century, the Confederacy's greatest general was not just a Southern hero but a national one, an emblem of all that was honorable, gallant and courteous in the American past. Recently, revisionists have worked to uncover the true character of a man whose virtue they find relentless. Here, a Civil War historian seeks out the actual R. E. Lee; and in an accompanying sidebar, the novelist Lamar Herrin explains how the general moved in and captured his latest book); Black And White And Red (Communist international paid to send a cast of American blacks to Moscow to make a movie about American racial injustice. The scheme backfired); Williamsburg On The Subway (In the most self-consuming of cities, an impressive and little-known architectural legacy remains to show us how New Yorkers have lived and prospered over the centuries since the days when the population stood at around one thousand); Postscripts To History (A New Jersey high school teacher and his students uncover the inspiration for the most famous of all Civil War novels); Editors' Bookshelf
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July / August
1991
Letters From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Douglas MacArthur); The Business Of America (The farthest fall); In The News (The rites of postwar reparations); My Brush With History (History on my block); American Made (A Molesworth chandelier); History Happened Here (Camp site - Chautauqua, New York); The Time Machine; How The Seventies Changed America (The "loser decade" is beginning to reveal itself as a bigger time than we thought); Seeking The Greatest Bluesman (Robert Johnson died in obscurity in 1938. Only recently have the facts of his short, tragic life become known); Pride Of The Prairie (At the dawn of this century a new form of residential architecture rose from the American heartland); Cold Mine (Ice was priceless in Calcutta, and a fortune awaited the man who figured out how to get it there); The Media And The Military (It's been a long. acrimonious road from Bull Run to Basara. Sometimes the press has the upper hand; somethimes the generals do. But the basic argument never changes); The Organized President (When Jefferson wanted a job done right, he did it himself); Visions Of My Father (You can rise fast and far in America, but the cost of the journey can be hard to tally); Present At The Apocalypse (Jan Wollett was on the last flight out of a crumbling Da Nang in 1975); Then And Now (In pictures); Postscripts To History (Whose house was this, anyway?); Editors' Bookshelf
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September
1991
Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Lyndon Baines Johnson); The Business Of America (Reforming the law); In The News (The abominable no. 2 man); History Happened Here (City of ships - Bath, Maine); American Made (The kast); My Brush With History (Melee in San Jose); The Time Machine; The Tyranny Of The Lawn (American homeowners have been struggling to remake their small patch of the environment into a soft,green carpet just like the neighbor's. Who told us this was the way a lawn had to be?); Eakins In Light And Shadow (The man who may be America's greatest artist liked to fend off the curious with the statement "My life is all in the works." The works and the life take on a new poignance with the release of a once-private collection of his letters, photographs and sketchbooks); Have Our Manners Gone To Hell? (A controversial recent book suggests that what we think of as good manners is a relavitely new thing, a commodity manufactured to meet the needs of an industrial age); My Search For Lyndon Johnson (The author found a man as unsavory as his detractors claim. He also found a man commited to fulfilling the highest ideals of this republic - and with the savvy to do it); Close Encounter (The mysterious thing that happened to Lieutenant Colonel Brown over Bremen in 1943 sent the pilot off to a quest that lasted his entire life); The Last Map Makers (Another frontier closes as the mapping of America approaches completion); Webster's Unalloyed (Webster's cartoons offer a warm, canny and utterly accurate view of an era of everyday middle class life); Editor's Bookshelf
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October
1991
Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of JFK); The Business Of America (The corners of Wall and Broad); In The News (Staking a claim on the past); History Happened Here (The ghose of Jonesborough, Tennessee); American Made (The sideboard); My Brush With History (Me 'n' Elvis); The Time Machine; Everything You Need To Know About Columbus (Exactly a year from now the world will be marking the five hundreth anniversary of the single most important event of the past millennium. The zeal of one man brought about that event, and his name and talk of his achievements will be omnipresent. Here, then, is a Columbus catechism to help you through the months ahead: Was he really the first? If he sailed for Spain, why do Italians make such a fuss about his birthday? How come America isn't named for him? Why is he being called a villain now?); Detroit Iron (A tribute to the brash confections our car makers offered the world during a decade when not one American in a thousand had ever heard of a Toyota); The Business Of Boxing (It has always been sport and business. Today it's a multimillion-dollar industry. It got that way through a handful of dramatic - and dramatized - clashes between heavyweight titans. Here are the bouts that built the modern sport); Naming A Justice: It Has Always Been Politics As Usual (Supreme Court vacancies have provoked fierce, colorful - and wholly partisan - battles since the earliest years of the Republic); Legacy Of Violence (Sociologists continue to be vexed by the pathology of urban violence: Why is it so random, so fierce, so easily triggered? One answer may be found in our Southern past); Editors' Bookshelf
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November
1991
Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Of Francis Parkman); The Business Of America (The man who wasn't there); In The News (Post-mortem publicity); History Happened Here (The pearl of the south - Ponce, Puerto Roco); American Made (A Mimbres painted bowl); My Brush With History (Moscow memories); The Time Machine; The Conversion Of Harry Truman ("I think one man is just as good as another," he said, "as long as he's honest and decent and not a nigger or a Chinaman." Yet Truman broke with his convictions to make civil rights a concern of the national government for the first time since Reconstruction - and in so doing he changed the nation forever); I Fought For Fidel (In the twilight of Castro's regime, one of the soldiers who put him in power recalls what it was like to be a fidelista up in the hills three and a half decades ago when a whole new, just, democratic world was there for the building. In an accompanying box, Castro's biographer Georgie Anne Geyer assesses her subject's long shadow); Credit Card America (How a businessman's embarrassment - he ate in a restaurant and found he didn't have the money to pay - made us a nation of instant, constant borrowers almost overnight); The Parson's Hearth (The 1683 Parson Capen house in Topsfield, Massachusetts, a rare survivor from New England's earliest days, testifies to the strength that would forge a nation); Memory As History (Seeking the truth of an event in the memories of people who lived through it can be a maddening task - as well as an exhilarating one); Editors' Bookshelf
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December
1991
Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times (Remembering the Pacific war); The Business Of America (The American superweapon); In The News (The first U.S.-Japan encounter); History Happened Here (London calling); American Made (The Jeep); My Brush With History (A date with a bombing); The Time Machine; My Guns: A Memoir Of The Second World War (Seeking the answer to a simple and terrible question: What was it like?); Secret Treason (He wanted only what every journalist of the time did: an exclusive interview with the Duke of Windsor. What he got was a once-in-a-lifetime story that was too hot to print - until now); The Transatlantic Duel: Hitler vs. Roosevelt (In 1941 the President understood better than many Americans the man who was running Germany, and Hitler understood Roosevelt and his country better than we knew); What To Call It? (It took us longer to name the war than to fight it); The Biggest Theater (Revisiting the seas where American carriers turned the course of history, a Navy man re-creates a time of frightful odds and brilliant gambles); Casablanca (Desperate improvisations in the face of imminent disaster saw us through the early years of the fight. They also gave us the war's greatest movie); A Place To Be Lousy In (North Africa was where the American army learned the hard lessons - none harder than the disaster at Kasserine. This was the campaign that taught us hot to fight a war); Hardships (An airman's sketchbook); Editors' Bookshelf
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February / March
1992
Contents - What Should We Teach Our Children About American History (The fiercest struggle going on in education is about who owns the past); The Winter Art Show (Our seventh annual portfolio of little-known American works that have impressed the editors both as art and as historical documents); America And Russia, Americans And Russians (The Cold War was an anomaly: more often than not the world's two greatest states have lived together in uneasy amity. And what now); Groping Toward Democracy (The Russians claim they want to be more like us - but do they have any idea who we are?); The First Kansas Colored (They were the first black men to fight in the Civil War. And they were the first to die); Colorado Chronicle (A pioneer photojournalist takes a candid look at life around Denver almost a hundred years ago); The Diamond Jubilee Of Jazz (Seventy-five years ago a not very good band cut a record that transformed our culture) Departments - Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times; The Business Of America; In The News; History Happened Here; American Made; My Brush With History; The Time Machine; Readers' Album; Editors' Bookshelf
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May / June
1992
Contents - How America's Health Care Fell Ill (As modern medicine has grown ever more powerful, our ways of providing it have gotten ever more wasteful); Indy (For more than eight decades the Indianapolis 500 has been the nation's premier racing event); The House Of Many Layers (The Colonial Revival was born in a time of ferment, and since then the style has resurfaced whenever we've needed reassurance); "Dear Beatrice Fairfax..." (America's first Miss Lonelyhearts and the newspaper column that started it all); Facing Death (Our ancestors look gravely and steadily upon things that we cannot); Hoovergate (On Watergate's twentieh anniversary, a similar conspiracy surfaces) Departments - Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times; The Business Of America; In The News; History Happened Here; American Made; My Brush With History; The Time Machine
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July / August
1992
Contents - "I Hardly Know Truman" (Thus did FDR characterize the man who was to be his running mate in 1944 and - as everyone at the astonishing Democratic Convention knew - almost certainly the next President of the United States); What Made Lizzie Borden Kill? (On the hundredth anniversary of the unsolved double murder of Andrew and Abby Borden, is it time to ask: What was going on in that family); Lakeside (A little-known Art Deco masterpiece, this Denver amusement park was splendidly modernized fifty years ago and has remained basically unchanged ever since); What We Lost In The Great War (Seventy-five years ago this spring a very different America waded into the seminal catastrophe of the twentieth century); The Greatest Athlete In The World (That's what everyone agreed Jim Thorpe was at the 1912 Olympics, but draconian rules took it away) Departments - Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times; The Business Of America; In The News; History Happened Here; American Made; My Brush With History; The Time Machine; Editors' Bookshelf
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October
1992
Contents - What Can You Learn From A Historical Novel? ("Good writers write the kind of history good historians can't or don't write." A long-time student of the genre seeks out the "real" history hidden in the mantle of fiction); Nat Turner Revisited (The author of the most controversial historical novel in memory looks back on its twenty-five year career); A Short And Scary Walk With Andrew Jackson (A new historical novel combines the great political scandal of the 1970's with the great political scandal of the 1820s); My Favorite Historical Novel (American Heritage recently asked a wide range of novelists, journalists and historians to answer a question: What is your favorite American historical novel, and why?) Departments - Letter From The Editor; Correspondence; The Life And Times; The Business Of America; In The News; History Happened Here; My Brush With History; The Time Machine; Editors' Bookshelf
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