1972 Family Handyman

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April
Contents - Smooth It Faster With A Portable Electric Sander (Power sanders can save the home handyman hours of tiresome hand sanding. They work faster, and unlike people, they don't get tired. Aside from those few jobs that still demand fine hand work, the electric units adapt almost universally. There are differences among power sanders, however, which are described in this story together with the why's and when's of using these tools); How To Choose The Right Carpeting For You (Today the list of styles, types and uses of carpeting is long enough to confuse nearly all but those connected with manufacturing or selling it. Here, one such expert in the carpeting field boils down the important features in carpet buying. To aid the homeowner in choosing the carpet best suited to him the author describes these needs which are most common and then lists the different kinds of carpet that satisfy them); Pave It With Bricks And Sand (Maybe you have thought brick patios are a thing for the rich or otherwise a product of the skillful mason's hands. Truth is that brick-paving is a simple enough job for the average handyman who takes time to follow the basic rules of preparation. The tools and materials are as down to earth as you can get, but the product can be as elaborate as you care to make it. Why not try your luck on a terrace for the garden or a patio for the family); Storage For A Child's Room (No member of the family with the exception of the handyman accumulates as much junk as a child. Our cover tells how to organize your child's mess with a simple storage method); Spring Prep For Storm Windows (To overlook something as simple as a storm window is not the best practice. It will soon be time to check latches, mountings, strips and weatherstrip lubrication); Lay Your Own Ceramic Tile Floor (New epoxy adhesives make it relatively easy for the do-it-yourselfer to complete his own ceramic floor project, and our story describes it in easy-to-follow steps); Keeping Your Wooden Gutters Troublefree (A lot of homeowners prematurely give up on their original wooden gutters and undertake the costly task of replacement. The maintenance tips in this story can help you avoid the same mistake); Shaker Sewing Desk For Your Wife (This installment in the Shaker project series is a how-to-please-your-wife with a sewing desk. Even if your wife doesn't sew, she will love this Shaker desk); Curing Chaos In The Garage (If there's no room for it in the house, chances are it will land in the garage with a thousand other things. But there is also a chance of finding it again if it's stored in a logical place. Our story tells how to make space); New Products For Old Problems (A long list of new products that are bound to be of help to the handyman will be found in the pages of this issue. Items listed include a 4-in-1 magnetic screwdriver, fire resistant shingles, embossed acrylic carpeting, a rubber coating for tool handles, new pipe insulation, a control system for sprinklers and a cordless shrub trimmer); Editor's Tests (Our editors put three new power tools to the task this month: a two-speed jig saw, a speed reducing power screwdriver attachment and a sander designed for irregular surfaces. Read the reports and find out whether these tools are worthy of becoming part of your workshop collection); Ask Handyman Q & A (Special problems from our readers are answered in this column each issue. Current tips by the Handyman solve such problems as painting downspouts and fireplaces, flooring with wood over concrete, restoring log walls, soundproofing a floor, partioning for a sauna bath, removing contact paper, removing cement from tile and flashing for a concrete floor); Booklets You Should Know About (The do-it-yourselfer will find much useful and interesting material to send for in this column. Booklets made available on lawn and garden equipment, operating a router, projects for the garden, caring for septic tank systems, furniture kits, colonial entrances and more); What It's Called And Where To Buy It (Names and addresses of the various manufacturers of products that are mentioned in the feature articles)
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June
Contents - Build Beauty And Function In Girl's Bedroom (Elbow room and storage space are probably the two most common scarcities in the average child's bedroom. And girls being what they are seem to be always needing a little bit of extra room for the extra things they live with. Our cover feature tells you an easy way to expand your girl's living space by converting one of her bedroom walls into a built-in bed and vanity dresser with ample storage cabinets beneath the partitioned bed); Hand-Held Shower Spray Is Easy To Install (This new spray unit, because of it's flexibility, gives a new angle to showering convenience, in fact it's a practical successor to the hand spray unit fixture now on most kitchen sinks. But the best news is that you don't have to be a plumber to install it. A couple of tools and a few hours of free time are all you need. We show how the average homeowner would hook up a hand held shower spray in a picture sequence story that begins on page 42); T-Shaped Bar-Bookcase Room Divider (The great majority of handymen deserve credit for their ingenuity - their knack for building around obstacles that would otherwise seem to stand in the way of a favorite project. Dave DeMaw of Newington, Conn. is no exception. He translated an idea his father gave him into a space-saving fixture that became part of the scheme in his finished basement. Our story tells how you can add an easy-to-build version of DeMaw's bar-bookcase to your home); Build This Shaker Armchair From A Kit Or From Scratch (We continue the Skaker collection feature in this issue with a graceful ladderback arm chair that you can either assemble from a kit or build yourself if you have a lathe to finish all the turnings according to the dimensions we have provided); Mix And Fix (Burt Murphy has brought together a pile of helpful information for the homeowner who wants to tackle his own masonry repairs this spring. He combines tips on how to spot different kinds of masonry problems with a lot of necessary advice on what tools to use and how to use them. The story also gives special emphasis to the pre-mixed patching compounds available in home supply and hardware stores in package sizes to fit small or big jobs. Some of the problems you can attack are chipped and broken areas on patios and foundations, damaged flagstones, curbings that are cracked and crumbled mortar around brick joints. Spring, the experts say, is the time for doing these repairs, so why not read the story and go to work?); Wooden Frames And Fiberglass Make An Easy Fence (Using colorful corrugated fiberglass panels, wood and creativity you can add attractiveness and privacy to your home with a design that fits); Beautiful Redwood Chairs From Old Aluminum Frames (Don't throw away your old aluminum folding chairs because you're tired of re-weaving them. Give them a new face with slats of redwood or pine); Give Your Vinyl Swimming Pool A Soft, Safe Bottom (Peat moss, available in packaged bales at hardware, garden and food stores, makes an excellent bedding for pools; read why and how to use it); New Products For Old Problems (This section describes and illustrates a wide range of new items of interest to the handyman. Some of the newest products include a flashlight-screwdriver combination, an electric drill that works off your car battery, a magnifying lamp, antique hinges and a spray glue); Books You Should Know About (Literature from manufacturers in pamphlet, booklet or leaflet form of interest to the do-it-yourselfer); Ask Handyman Q & A (Letters from readers with special problems concerning home maintenance, repair or improvement are answered by the technical editor. Topics covered in this issue include finding plywood for jig-saw puzzle blanks, removing spots from a table, filling wall cracks, insulating a basement, removing soot stains from shingles, making shallow concrete patches, getting rid of mold that grows in showers, preserving barn siding, checking for causes of peeling paint, preventing tarnish on brass and ailver plus some facts on faucet washers); Feedback (A letter from Dow Corning on the subject of silicone sealers responding to Mort Schultz's story on caulk that appeared in the March issue); Editor's Tests (For this report the editors worked with a reversible 3/8" screwdriver-drill manufactured by Black & Decker and a saw table and guide made for portable circular saws by Port-A-Table Saf-T-Saw Inc. See these evaluation reports to learn what the editors say about the tools); What It's Called And Where To Buy It (Names and addresses of the various manufacturers of products that are mentioned in the feature articles); Home Shopper (An easy way to shop at home for interesting items); Index To 8 Previous Issues (That story you can't recall may be here)
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