Wartime Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.


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During World War II most of the manufacturing companies, such as auto and appliance, were devoted to producing items for the war effort. The normal influx of new cars, stoves and other metal items ground to a halt. Food items, gasoline and other staples needed overseas were rationed at home. Therefore the advertising dollar for these major companies went to showing the consumer just what contribution they were making to help save the soldiers overseas. Keeping the company names in the eyes of the consumer so that when the war was over, gratitude would direct the purchase of new items. Additionally some ads were intended to help the consumer reduce loss and need for repair. Listed here are some of the ads from that time. They are very interesting and give one a slight feel for the sacrifices made by everyone during that time.
 
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BRAND
AD DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
Adel Precision Products Corp
Full color 8" x 11" ad that discusses how far the aviation industry has come since the Wright Brother first flew to the time of this ad. The drawing in the ad wass done by Walt Disney and shows a Douglas B-19 flying through the air with the Wright Brother plane parked on it's wing for the sake of comparison. Adel is letting everyone know that the techniques they are learning now will enable there to be many peacetime improvements in the daily life. Mickey Mouse is in the corner flashing the Peace Sign and saying that "Bonds will buy Bombs - Planes like this will deliver them".
September 1943
Good Housekeeping
0
$8.00
View Adel Wartime / Disney ad

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Airlines of the United States
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that gave the general public an idea what The AIrlines of the United States were doing to help the war effort. The ad contains a drawing that shows us two white-haired gentlemen in fatigues looking out of a tent at night, past a soldier on sentry duty, at an airplane that is either taking off or landing. The headline calls this scene "Somewhere West of Suez" and the text explains that these planes were involved in transporting "the greatest gathering of military leaders in history" to a secret council of war, "almost in the enemy's camp". It goes on to say that planes are now able to allow global face-to-face meetings between important people to plan actions and to make the supplying of troops entirely possible in a scope never thought of before.
April 5, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime ad

Airlines of the United States
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" wartime ad for what many of the pilots and the pre-war commercial planes were doing to aid the war effort. There is a drawing of a twin-prop plane, with number NC 21320 on it's wing, flying in the evening sky as the headline introduces "A day in my life by NC 21320". The text talks about the number of trips made and the passengers carried being double what was done before the war and talks about some of the types of passengers and loads it was asked to carry. It talks about how the airlines had lain the groundwork for this situation in the earlier days which has made this transistion very easy and practical. It ends by offereing some advice about ways to help make your trip or shipment easier and suggests as always that you "Buy EXTRA WAR BONDS this month".
October 4, 1943
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime

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American Airlines
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that discusses how much less time it takes for items and people to be transported through the air. There is a picture of an American Airlines crew standing in front of their plane that is parked on the snow and ice covered Artic. The headline calls attention to trips that took "Yesterday 6 weeks - Today 45 minutes". The text discusses a journey in New Guinea that previously had to be undertaken by horseback but is now able to be quickly handled in the air. It then question who is responsible for this tremendous improvement and gives some credit to the "General, Admirals, Airlines and Aircraft manufacturers" but it feels that most of the credit should go to the "air transport crews in the air and on the ground". The text continues by mentioning other ways that aviation has been improved by force-fed developments brought around by the needs of war.
1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime ad

The American Trucking Industry
Black and white 9" x 12 1/2" ad for the Trucking Industry that kept supplies rolling to the coast where it could be shipped overseas "Not too little...not to late...But all you need...when and where you need it". There is a picture of a group of soldiers crawling forward with all of the supplies that they might need and another drawing that shows a long truck convoy bringing more supplies to where they are needed. The text promises that there will be "No More Bataans" and claimed that freight is being shipped 250% faster with the Know-how, organization and skill being put forth by The American Trucking Industry
October 5, 1942
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 71

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about how the Railroad industry has always been "together" and , with 700 seperate railrroads, are able to function efficiently. Now, in this time of war, this ability that the railroads possess is able to provide for the country, "Teamwork for Victory". The picture in the ad shows three engines in the yard, bellowing smoke as they wait to pull out to transport more materials.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad / Wartime

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that reminds us that as hard as it is for the railroads to move all of the troops and supplies, it is even worse in the winter. The headline says "Soldiers on the Winter Front" and has a picture of a fully-loaded train working its way through a heavy snowfall. The text talks about the many things that the American Railroad companies have to do extra to keep the supplies going and mentions a few things that regular passengers can do to alleviate problems.
February 8, 1943
Life magazine
0
$8.50
View Wartime / Railroad

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Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the effort put forth by this group to handle the twice as much freight, four times as much passenger traffic while using no more equipment than they had before the war. There is a drawing of an old coal engine with the headline claiming that "We've got everything working but This One". They admit that it has taken a lot of effort and planning but the worst may still be to come when the war is over and they have to cnange everything over to a new system.
February 21, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Wartime / Railroad

Autocar
- Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a picture of a Multiple-Gun Motor Carriage advancing on the enemy with it's 37mm anti-aircraft gun and .50 caliber machine guns blazing to protect the soldiers that are advancing with it. The ad headline calls it "Deadly". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 18, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Autocar

Autocar
1944 Autocar Trucks - Full color 10" x 13" ad for their heavy trucks that were doing work at the home fronts and at the fighting fronts. The ad has a picture of an Autocar Truck from the Bigge Drayage Company in California slowly pulling a trailer holding a 60-ton hull section of a prefabricated warship for Henry J. Kaiser". The ad claims that the truck and trailer assembly is 105' long and 26 1/2' tall and the 38-wheeled combination must travel along eight miles of city streets. The ad headline calls this another example of going "Down to the Sea in Autocars!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 24, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Autocar / Wartime

Autocar Trucks
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad with a drawing of a Pacific Island jungle road filled with foot soldiers, a speeding motorcycle and a tanker truck. Flying overhead are U.S. bombers and lying by the side of the road is a bullet-riddle wing with a Rising Sun. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Wartime / Autocar

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Autocar
1945 Autocar Trucks - Ad shows a large Autocar cab being used to deliver a ship's propeller in for wartime production. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view. January 22, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00 View Autocar / Wartime
B. F. Goodrich
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a photo of a tank being pulled onto the back of a heavy-duty trailer. The ad headline asks you to "Meet the dragon wagon" and the text explains how B. F. Goodrich had to develop a tire strong enough to hold a 30-ton General Sherman tank and haul it off the battlefield for repairs. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime 30

Black & White
Black and white 5 1/4" x 13" ad for their Blended Scotch Whisky. The ad has the headline "Victory is 'in the Bag'!" and a picture that shows the two Scottie dogs the company uses picking up waste paper and putting it into a large bag. The ad text explains how important it is to recycle waste paper so it can be used for "containers for war weapons, medical and food supplies" and even goes as far as saying "Waste paper that's thrown away may cost the life of a soldier on a distant fighting front!". This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 28, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Liquor / Wartime

Body by Fisher
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that has a photograph of a line of completed tanks rolling off the assembly lines. The ad headline describes this as being "on the One road that counts!" and at the bottom of the ad the "Body by Fisher" logo has the word "Body" crossed out and replaced with the word "Armanent". The text begins with a mantra about the 'Road to Victory" and mentions that, beside the tank armour Fisher Body is also producing "bombers, tanks and anti-aircraft guns for the Army, ordnance for the Navy and other war necessities".
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
2
$8.00
View Wartime / Body by Fisher

Body by Fisher
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a stirring drawing by Dean COrnwell of a soldier in uniform and a young Oriental boy standing and looking overhead at a low flying group of B-29 Superfortresses leaving for action. The ad headline calls them "Strictly Super" and talks about the different parts of this powerful plane that are contributed by Body by Fisher. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 2, 1945
Life magazineCollier's magazine
2
$8.50
View Wartime / Cornwell / Body by Fisher

Boeing
Black and white 9 3/4" x 12" ad with a photo of a wartime assembly plant with a partially assembled fuselage of a Boeing Flying Fortress being craned over a floor full of similar works in progress. The ad headline calls it "Flight without Wings" and talks about some of the assembly line procedures used by Boeing. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Aviation

Boeing
Black and white 10" x 13" ad that shows a photo of "Another Boeing Superfortress starts for Japan". This is a wartime ad that reminds us of the cooperation needed to produce these planes in the quantity needed for war.
October 2, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime

Boeing
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a photo of a B-29 Superfortress from underneath that shows it;s twin bomb-bay doors open. The ad describes this as "Double trouble - for Japs" and describes the capabilities of this powerfull plane. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 9, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Aviation

Brewing Industry
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that features a drawing of a smiling young soldier lying on his bunk reading a letter from home while a steam shovel sits parked outside his window and snow shoes are hanging from the wall. The ad headline reminds us that "Morale is a lot of little things" while the text of the ad explain how small pieces of home and normal activities can do so much to keep morale up. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outside edges of the ad do not show up in the scanned image.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$4.00
View Wartime 14

Bronson
Three color 7 1/4" x 10 1/2" wartime ad that mentions their wartime efforts while reminding the readers of some of the products that will be resumed after the war. The ad has a picture of bombers flying in formation and the text talks about Bronson receiving the Army-Navy E Award for their efforts. The ad also shows the 25 Bait-Casting Reel and their Deep Sea Reel which they planned to produce again at war's end.
July 1943
Sports Afield
1
$5.00
View Fishing 39

Buick
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about several of the ways that Buick was contributing to the war effort. There is a picture of a man working on a Pratt & Whitney engine that was produced by Buick and the headline calls him "Unsung Hero Number One". The text explains that, in addition to building these Pratt & Whitney engines, Buick is treining approximately 50 soldiers a week on how to service these engines and keep them running when overseas. A good engine is worth so much more when serviced by a trained mechanic.
December 21, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Buick

Buick
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad has a drawing of an elderly lady reading a letter. The ad headline explains that "A Pilot's letter advises: 'Better fly Buick'" and talks about how her son, who flies Liberator bombers, feels so safe and secure in these planes powered by Buick. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Buick

Cadillac
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that explains how Cadillac used their peacetime technology to develop engines and Hydra-Matic Transmissions for tanks. The text gives somewhat of a history mentioning that the M-5 Light Tank was developed first followed by the M-8 Howitzer Motor Carriage. Thousands of these machines were produced and are still in use in battlefields around the world. From the experience gained developing the previous tanks the M-24, which is pictured in the ad, was produced and is doing well in battle. These tanks are each using two of the Cadillac V-type engines driving two Cadillac Hydra-Matic transmissions. The text indicates that the wartime engines have been vastly improved over the peacetime engines which means that the post-war Cadillacs should be more dependable.
March 19, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Cadillac ad

Californians, Inc.
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that tries to dissuade travelers from going to California, especially San Francisco, during World War II. The ad has a drawing of San Francisco harbor showing it lined with ships waiting to be loaded and cruising out heading for the Golden Gate Bridge. The ad headline says "Don't come to San Francisco NOW" and the ad talks about war workers as well as Army and Navy personnel filling the hotels and restaurants while industry works around the clock. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 28, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 54

Camels
Full color 9" x 12" ad with a Submarine theme. The ad has a sailor who serves on a Sub and a lady who calibrates the gyroscopes on torpedoes and they are both relaxing with Camel cigarettes. The ad headline assures us that "You want Steady Nerves to launch a 'tin fish' or make one". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 5, 1942
Life magazine
1
$4.00
View Camels 10

Campbell
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" wartime ad for the effort that the Campbell Company was making to keeping our soldiers supplied. There is a picture of a smiling grocer holding up a single can of Campbell's Tomato Juice and he is expaining "It's the last one, Lady! More than 90% of this year's Campbell's Tomato Juice goes overseas to the Army and Navy". It claims that you will see more cans of this product on newsreels than you will on store shelves but it is helping the soldiers receive their needed vitamins in an easy and delicious form. The ad urges the civilians to have fresh tomatoes or citrus fruit daily to preserve their own health.
Unknown
1
$8.00
View Campbell / Wartime

Canada
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad written shortly before the United States was brought into World War II. Canada, along with Britain, were fully involved and they were trying to keep their economy strong. This ad is to encourage Americans to continue to visit Canada. The main ad headline tells us that "Canada at War is still the greatest playground in the World. 14 Million Americans say so". Other text tells us that "It is just as easy to return to the United States as it is to enter Canada" and that "Your Canadian vacation will do double duty" by pumping money into their economy that will help them repay the U.S. for war supplies that are being bought.
April 1941
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Travel / Wartime

Canada Dry
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their Ginger Ale. This wartime ad has a picture of a lady in a uniform serving her young son cookies and Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale at their kitchen table. The ad, noting her uniform, asks What service is she in?" and offers answers like "WAVE? WAC? SPAR? Marine?" before saying "None of these". The answer comes that she is a taxicab driver and explains that women who used to do more feminine jobs are now "doing something about the manpower shortage". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1944
Woman's Home Companion
0
$5.00
View Canada Dry 55

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Chevrolet
Black and white 9" x 12" ad details their "Car Conservation Plan". It shows ways to make your cat, tires and every other mechanical part last so there will not be a need to replace anything. These methods will allow you to keep your car serving faithfully for the duration. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1942
Better Homes and Gardens
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Chevrolet

Chevrolet
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for an Armored Car that Chevrolet secretly built to help the Allied advance. The ad has a close-up photo of one in action and another photo of a train-load of these cars heading to action. The ad headline asks you to "Meet One of the Allies Secret Weapons. The Chevrolet-Built Armored Car. Instrument of Victory Extraordinary." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 30, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Chevrolet

Chrysler
Black and white 9 3/4" x 12" ad has a photo of an assembly line where several groups of people are working on wing sections for the Navy dive bombers, the Helldiver. The ad headline says "Urgent! Said the Navy...so here they are" and talks about how there was a quick and urgent need for parts for this plane and how Chrysler jumped to the task. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 13, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Chrysler

Chrysler
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad has a drawing that shows an iron-jawed sailor looking upward as Bofors guns blast away at invading Japanese fighter planes. The ad headline says that "Nelly gets another one!" and explains how Chrysler perfected a process called Superfinish which allowed quicker and more precise finishing of precision parts which has allowed more of these guns to be built. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Chrysler

Deepfreeze
Black and white 8 3/4" x 12" ad that explains why the Deepfreeze Motor Products Corporation is not able to supply the general public with new freezers for their homes while the battles against the Axis rages on. There is a picture of an American PT boat charging with guns blazing through a section of sea filled with burning ships and enemy planes. The headline starts by saying that "One Good Reason you haven't a new Deepfreeze today..." and the text continues by mentioning the Deepfreeze units that are built into these boats to provide "quick frozen foods for fighting men" and "to preserve vital serums that save fighters' lives". It also talks about how the existing units that people have in their homes can be used to handle what comes out of the Victory Gardens that every practical American was supposed to have. There is a drawing of a lady standing behind her Deepfreeze unit, looking nothing like what we are used to, and mention is made urging "Dealers and Distributors: Interested in after-victory sales ot Deepfreeze" to inquire now for postwar planning.
December 1943
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Appliance / Deepfreeze

De Soto
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that brings to the reader's attention some of the many ways that De Soto was helping the Allied cause to win World War II. The ad has a picture of a plane flying over an area that could be a bombed out landscape and the words "Wing Sections by De Soto" are proudly stamped in red. The text calls for the precision and "faultless workmanship" that is needed for parts used on combat planes everywhere. The ad mentions that, in addition to Plane Wing Sections they are involved in Bomber Fuselage nose and center sections, vital assemblies for anti-aircraft guns and General Sherman Tanks in addition to a variety of manufacturing services. The ad also reminds us that the De Soto / Plymouth dealers are still providing "ample parts and skillful service".
January 24, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View De Soto / Wartime

De Soto
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has six photos of War workers E. H. Krug and his pretty daughter Dolores and how important a reliable car is to their wartime existance. The ad headline tells you to "Work with a wartime De Soto" and talks about how important it is to keep things inspected and repaired. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / DeSoto

De Soto
De Soto - Three color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" wartime ad has a drawing that shows a herd of cattle being driven by cowboys on horses who are gathered around a parked De Soto. The ad headline claims tha "Of all the De Soto cars ever built, 7 out of 10 are still running". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 2, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
De Soto / Wartime

Dodge
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a drawing of a cloudy night on the ocean with a convoy of ships moving together toward their goal. The ad also has a large hand pointing the way and a headline that says "Safe Passage - Sight Unseen". The ad text talks about the Sperry Gyro-Compass which Dodge produced which helped ships by giving surer guidance and safer passage. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Dodge

E. R. Squibb & Sons
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad is a little bit different than most of the other ads on this page, it doesn't explain what people or companies are doing to help the war effort. This ad shows a group of young boys saluting as they recite The Pledge of Allegiance. The text talks about how these twenty-nine words helped to build a strong unity within our country and pride in our flag. It explains how it is behind every War Bond bought and every dollar given to the Red Cross and the U.S.O.. As we have progressed and deemed it unnecessary to waste our time with this statement that I remember standing for each morning in elementary school I wonder if leaving it out of our days has helped in causing the lethargic reactions so many people have to our flag. The text also talks about the quality that E.R. Squibb & Sons put into their products.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$6.00
View Wartime 78

Electric Boat Company
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Submarines built by this company and the wonderful job they were doing doing World War II. There is a double-view painting that shows a Japanese ship burning as it slips beneath the ocean surface while also showing the conning tower of the submarine that sent the torpedoes that were responsible for, as the raised fingers of the one sailor indicate, the third ship sunk within 2 1/2 hours. The headline calls it "Revenge in the Pacific" and the text mentions more exploits of this branch of the service including the fact that "As this goes to press, the latest Navy report officially credits them with 277 Jap ships sunk or smashed since the beginning of the war!". The ad also shows the Submarine Officers' Insignia, mentions the three locations where production of the necessary parts were done and urges all readers to Buy War Bonds.
August 30, 1943
Life magazine
1
$9.00
View Wartime / Boating

Electric Boat Company
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Submarines they were responsible for building during World War II. The ad has a picture, which was a copy of a lithograph they were sending out during the war, of one of their Submarines underwater shooting a torpedo. The ad, rather than talk about it's product, devoted most of the text to talking about the above-average men who volunteered for duty on equipment like this. The headline calls them the "Pride of the Fleet!" and encourages men that if you "Want ACTION? Sign on a Sub!". The ad also gives numbers of Japanese ships sunk at this time, probably sunk and damaged. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 28, 1944
Life magazine
0
$9.00
View Wartime / Boating

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Evans Products Company
Three color 9 1/2" x 12" ad has a large drawing of several soldiers lying in a fern covered forest shooting their machine gun which is attached to a short stand. The ad headline describes "Sturdy legs of steel for messengers of death" and describes these machine gun stands they produce before getting into a list of many of the other products they are contributing to the war effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$4.50
View Wartime 19

Evinrude
Black and White 7 1/4" x 10 1/2" wartime ad that helps the public see another way that some of their favorite products can be used in the war effort. The ad has a picture of a line of army boats powered by Evinrude Outboard Engines that are holding up a bridge that the Army Engineers are putting up over a necessary river. The headline says "Helping Build the Army's Bridges" and the text explains how a bridge can quickly appear under the feet of infantrymen.
July 1943
Sports Afield
1
$8.00
View Boating / Wartime

Fashion Frocks
Full color 8" x 11" ad that explains that this company is, despite wartime restrictions, still managing to make dresses that are stylish and built with quality while, at the same time, making an unknown number of Parachutes that have helped to save an untold number of lives of American aviators. The headline calls them "Dependable! on the war front - on the home front" and says they manufacturer "Parachutes for our 'Soldiers of the Sky'" and "Dresses for our 'Soldiers of the Home'". The top part of the ad talks about the Parachutes and the importance of quality which needs to built into one of these with the number and destination being considered "military secrets". The bottom part of the ad talks about the dresses that are available in somewhat of a limited quantity with the same process of being sold by Home Service Representatives. They speak of how this is a more sensible method what with the gas rationing that had to be in effect throughout the war. The claim the prices have never been inflated still being in the $3.98 to $14.98 range.
September 1943
Good Housekeeping
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Women's Clothing

Ford
"Swifter than a race horse it flew over the icy streets!" This wartime ad, featuring a full color drawing of a Model T on an snow covered early 20th century street, reminds the paying public that Ford had always built vehicles that last and will do so again soon. May 29. 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00 View Ford Misc / Wartime
Fruehauf
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" wartime ad that makes certain that the general public knows that the trucking industry, mostly using Fruehauf trailers is responsible for handling the problem of "How to Unite Scattered Factories". Thompson Products is used as an example due to it having six factories scattered over a five-mile area in Cleveland. The ad claims that six Fruehauf trailers are going full time hauling materials from plant to plant so that products can be finished and shipped to the soldiers who need them. The ad calls attention to the fact that they can Carry Big Loads, their Maneuverability is a big asset and that using them as a Shuttle Service saves time and money. The ability of Fruehauf trailers to keep up with the need is considered part of the reason that Thompson Products has received the Army-Navy "E" award.
April 28, 1945
Collier's
1
$8.00
View Trailer / Wartime

Gas
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that illustrates the importance of gas in preparing some of the important machinery for the war effort. The ad features a drawing of a huge oven on the deck of a ship with several people standing and looking up at the open door The open door is exposing three battleship gun barrels that are sticking out. The ad headline informs us that "Battleship Turrets...baked like a Cake...with Gas!". The ad text describes how gas is used in the production of turrets, tanks, guns, planes, ships and shells. It continues by reminding the housewife about how practical and economical Gas is for cooking so that everyone can realize just why Gas is used in the production of these heavy items.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
2
$5.00
View Wartime 8

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" wartime ad for their Automatic Blankets or, as we call them now, an Electric Blanket. There is a picture of a man with a wary look in his eyes as he heads toward his bed wearing red long-johns, a hat and soft boots and carrying the skin of a dead lion over his shoulder. The headline reassures him to "Drop that Lion-Skin Uncle Lem! One G-E Automatic Blanket will keep you warm all night, every night." The text mentions the light weight of these blankets and has you imagine every inch of the bed being warm, not just the spot that you have been occupying. It mentions a price of $34.50 but warns you that what is on hand will be "The Last Till Victory" since the blanket factory has been converted to making Electrically heated flying suits, shoes, gloves and other equipment for the Armed Forces.
October 19, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Bedding / Wartime

General Electric
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a drawing of a mother working on making alterations to a coat worn by her sad looking little boy. The ad headline promises that "Bigger things are coming you way, Junior". The ad text explains to the young boy, and to the general public, that by accepting hand-me-downs now we will be able to accept the greatest hand-me-downs of them all, liberty and democracy. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$4.00
View Wartime 13

General Electric
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their Mazda Lamps and the part they played in helping during World War II. The headline calls them "The lamp that paints a bullseye on Axis planes!" and the text explains how it worked. It explains the method that was used to allow the pilots and gunners to place an orange light on the enemy plane to indicate that it was lined up with their guns. It talks about what standards they had to achieve for this to work then mentions that G.E. had to supply lamps ranging from 10,000 watts down to the tiny instrument lights.
January 24, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Lamp / Wartime

General Electric
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Mazda Lamps which have been effectively used by the Navy during battle. The headline calls them "The G.E. Sewing Machine Lamp that joined the Navy!" and explains that a bulb more heavy-duty was needed to withstand the shocks of the fighting ships in the ocean. This bulb, designed for Sewing Machines, was pressed into service and has provided a much sturdier light source. The text talks about how General Electric has,since the time of Edison, paid close attention to the filaments, constantly working to improve them.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View G.E. / Wartime

General Motors
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for what their Truck and Coach Division is contributing to the war effort. Under the headline "Around the Clock" is a picture of a transport truck driving across a rubber pontoon bridge while under the headline "Arouond the Clock" is a picture of warmly-dressed soldiers in Iceland are firing a 105 mm Howitzer. The text talks mostly about the trucks reminding us how important it is to get supplies to wherever the fighting men have progressed to.
1942
Life
1
$5.00
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General Motors
Full color 9" x 13 1/2" ad that illustrates that some of the same things they have worked on to make your car last longer have helped to make our equipment of war last longer. The ad has a picture of a little girl lying on the beach and looking up at the camera with a look of dismay on her face as she holds an empty ice cream cone and the scoop that, moments ago resided in her cone, lies undesired in the sand. The headline tells us that "Sand can spoil a lot of things" and the text reminds us that General Motors has, over the years, spent time and effort making the brakes, wheels and chassis more securely sealed from the sand seen on the everyday road. All the knowledge they had accumulated in peacetime was now being used to make equipment survive North African sandstorms, coral dust in the South Pacific and silica on European beachheads. The text continues by saying that our way of life allows our companies to refine such important skills and will allow "better things for more people in the greater America to come."
July 24, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.50
View Wartime 61

General Motors
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad discusses another way that the improvements that General Motors had developed in peacetime have been used to make a difference in war. The ad has a picture of a little girl sifting flour and she has turned around to look at the reader with a startled look on her face. The headline says "Take two cups of copper flour" and the text indicates that this recipe is what has startled the little girl. It continues by talking about the powdered metal technology that General Motors has developed over the years and how, being used in wartime production, is saving time, money and, inevitibaly, lives. It claims to have contributed to "the full life we lived in prewar times" and "it will provide more and better things for more people in the coming years of peace".
September 18, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.50
View Wartime 60

Green Giant
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that tells you "How to Eat like a Patriot". The ad talks about the three cardinal rules of eating: Eat right foods, Share restricted foods and Waste no foods. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 7, 1944
Life magazine
1
$4.50
View Green Giant 7

Greyhound
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" wartime ad that explains that even though the resources of Greyhound are being used to transport soldiers instead of sightseers, "They're still seeing this Amazing America All Over the World!". It talks abut the documentary that Greyhound made and distributed worldwide called This Amazing America. The ad shows four people who are identified as being here, there and everywhere watching with extreme interest the wonders of America. It quotes an Army Chaplain who claims to have shown this film in many places with incredible results and the ad says that soon, when the war is over, Greyhound will again be taking people on scenic trips around this country.
January 31, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Bus / Wartime

International Harvester
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad with a drawing that shows soldiers just off of the front lines working to repair a tank for a return to battle. The ad headline tells us that "To keep the battle machines slugging Harvester men form maintenance battalion to serve the battle line". The text reminds us that machinery and equipment will break down, just like soldiers do, and need to be fixed before going back into action. It tells us how Army Ordance went to International Harvester with a request to form a battalion of mechanical specialists who could go to the fighting areas and quickly take care of any equipment problems so that a return to action would happen quicker. Harvester did respond quickly and sent hundreds of mechanics over in addition to the 5,000 who were already there as fighting soldiers.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / International

International Harvester
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad has a drawing of a determined farmer driving his Farmall through his fields. The ad headline explains that "He Drives a Weapon" and explains how difficult it was for the fewer number of farmers had to supply food for everyone working at home and overseas. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the wcanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
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International Harvester
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad has a drawing that is entitled Invasion. It shows a beachhead scene where a bulldozer is being unloaded along with other heavy equipment. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 22, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / International

Interstate
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad that mentions their new plane, the L-6. The ad has a picture of two people with binoculars looking at this plane flying overhead and the ad has the headline "Attention: Aircraft Spotters! There's a friendly stranger in the sky". The ad talks about it's use by the United States Navy and describes the speed with which they first built this plane and the other parts and equipment Interstate is contributing to the war effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 31, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Aviation

Jeep
Full color drawing of Jeeps traversing a snow-covered battle scene in what is supposed to be Russia. The ad talks about how impressed the Russian soldiers are with this vehicle and how the Willys "Go Devil" Engine is unimpeded by the bitter cold. The ad mentions the value of the 1942 Willys Americar, how it gets 35 miles-per-gallon and will enable it's tires to last up to 40,000 miles and is available for delivery when you fill out an application with the Rationing Board. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 15, 1943
Life magazine
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Johnson
Black and white 7 1/4" x 10 3/4" war-time ad that reminds us of some of the things that we were fighting for. The ad has a cute picture taken from the bow of a little boat looking back at the little boy and little girl that were steering this boat. The boy has his hand on the tiller of the Johnson Outboard Engine and the ad headline asks to "Let the Sun Peek Thru". The ad text quite philisophically wonders about how things will be when the fighting between nations finally stops.
July 1943
Sports Afield
1
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View Boating / Wartime

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the V---Mail that Kodak created and is now used by several different countries to minimize the weight of the thousands of letters sent back and forth from families to soldiers. With this system letters are written and photographed on Kodak microfilm. The microfilm is then shipped, containing thousands of letters, to its general destination where it is changed back to a paper letter and delivered to the intended person. Kodak along with Pan American Airways and British Overseas Airways formed a company called Airgraphs, Ltd. and have developed the transportation part of the system. This system has reduced the weight of mail by about 100 times.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Camera / Wartime

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad has a drawing of a duck in flight with bullet tracers going behind him and the question "What if the duck could shoot back?". The text talks about the Cine-Kodak Film and Magazine system that was being used to train our aerial gunners to shoot more effectively. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Camera

Kodak
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their K-24 Aircraft Camera which, as explained in the ad, played a big part in reconnaissance during World War II. The ad has a picture of a bombandier and a gunner sitting together at their stations in a bomber. The caption explains that each time bombs were dropped the K-24 Kodak Camera would electronically take pictures, The text gives some specific details about its use in bombers and in reconnaissance planes and explains how, out of necessity, it was designed to "run its own show".
April 17, 1944
Life magazine
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Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the Kodak 35. This is a wartime ad and it talks about how invaluable the camera being built for the U.S. Signal Corps is. And how "you can look forward to it as one of your 'after the war' experiences". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 8, 1944
Life magazine
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Laced Corsets
Several pictures in black and white that show that the Elastic and Zippers in Corsets are going out and being replaced with Laces. There are pictures showing a lady cinching laces on the front, on the side and on the back of her corset. The text explains that though these are more comfortable than the older styles, their persence is made responsible by the War Production Board so that elastic and zippers can be used in the war effort.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Under / Wartime

Milwaukee Road
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for railroad's importance during the war. The ad has a drawing of German Soldiers reacting with panic as explosions go on around them. The ad headline claims the damage is "...compliments of Milwaukee Road 'white coal'" and explains that white coal is the electricity that is used so that oil can be saved to be used by bombers.
November 1943
National Geographic
1
$8.50
View Railroad / Wartime

Milwaukee Road
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad that talks about the importance of Railroad Stations to the small towns of America. The ad has a drawing of a small dog seen among the lower legs of a group of people waiting on the train station platform for an arriving train. The ad headline calls him "The 'pup' that meets all trains" and talks about the 'goodbye's' and the 'welcome home's' that are shared in places such as this.
July 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.50
View Railroad / Wartime

Mobilgas
Full color 9 3/4" x 14" ad has a photo of a Mobil gas station attendant putting gas into a car as he talks with two men standing by. The ad headline claims that "You'll Ride on Flying Horsepower After Victory". The ad text discusses how Mobil has built new refineries for the War-Effort and after the fighting is done they will be able to provide High-Octane fuel for the American public. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not appear in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$4.00
View Service Station 9

Nash-Kelvinator
Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that barely mentions the non-wartime activities of this company yet delivers a very powerful message to remind those at home what was going on far-away. There is a picture of a blonde girl in fatigues standing with a stunned look on her face as a U.S. plane is parked behind her with a Red Cross vehicle next to it. The headline says "I looked into my brother's face" and the text tells the story of how, as a nurse, she would check wounded soldiers as they were brought in. She would comfort them out and look for serious injuries and, as she was wiping the mud from one soldier's face, she realized that he was her brother. The text talks about the difficulties with having to mentally float between a peaceful past and the horror of war, especially when it becomes as personal as it did for this nurse. It reminds us that the purpose for this action was to "keep on having the kind of America my brother and I grew up in" and we are reminded to "Keep it that way until we come back!". The ad proudly admits that their pre-war production has been replaced with the building of 2,000 h.p. Pratt & Whitney engines for Navy Vought Corsair fighters...making intricate Hamilton Standard propellers and readying production lines to build Sikorsky helicopters for the Army Air Force.
September 1943
Good Housekeeping
0
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Nash-Kelvinator
Full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad has a drawing of several soldiers carrying a wounded soldier through a Pacific Island scene. The ad headline says that you "Can't keep a good man down...". The text reads about the thoughts of a Marine who was wounded in an attack. He then thinks about "My America" and what he is fighting for. Some if the text mentions what items Nash-Kelvinator is making in it's war effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 1944
McCall's
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Nash-Kelvinator
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad done as World War II was winding down and reminding the Servicemen that what they were fighting for, what they remembered, still existed at home. The headline says "Waiting for You..." and has a drawing of a young man and his close-sitting girl driving on a scenic road in an open-topped car. The text scrolls off a list of memories and sensations that were probably vivid in the dreams of homesick soldiers and ends with the joyous mention that Nash would switch from "the building of engines of war to the making of two great new cars deesigned to be the finest, biggest, most comfortable, most economical, most advanced automobiles ever produced in their respective fields". They also mentioned plans to "build these cars in numbers three times greater than we did before the war" so they could "help contribute jobs, the opportunities, the futures which will insure the strong, vital and growing America all of us owe to those who are fighting and working to preserve it".
April 28, 1945
Collier's
1
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View Wartime / Nash

New York Central Railroad
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of a young boy holding his school books and standing next to his dog on a small hilltop as they wave to a passing freight train. The ad headline describes the scene as "A boy on a hill-top" and the text tells a story of this young boy turning twenty-one on December 7, 1941 and is now serving overseas. His father, a railroad man, vows to do everything in his power to keep the supplies on schedule until his son returns to his job on the railroad. This ad is larger than the bed on my scanner so the edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned image.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Wartime / Railroad

Norge Household Appliances
Full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad with a drawing of a husband and wife in their kitchen looking at the spot where their refigerator should be. Instead the spot is filled with a twin gun turret and a soldier. The ad headline informs the reader that "This is how a NEW 1943 NORGE would look in your kitchen". The ad text describes the abilities of this item built with the metal that was available because new refigerators are not being built.. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1943
Ladies Home Journal
1
$4.50
View Wartime 3

Norge Household Appliances
Full color 9" x 12" ad that assures us that the entire production of the Norge factories has been converted to war work and that many of the production workers are women, even on the night shift. The drawing shows a woman under the headline "Night Shift" studiously running a drill press. The text says that in many plants one out of every five women employed is on the night shift and everyone should appreciate the fact that women doing factory work, needed to produce war materials, releases more men to be deployed overseas.
October 1943
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$5.00
View Wartime 74

North American Aviation
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad that reminded the American public just what part that the North American Aviation company was playing in helping defeat the forces from Japan and Germany by showing a copy of a letter that was supposedly sent to Dr. Goebbels c/o Adolph Hitler. The letter mentions the P-51 Mustangs in the battle over Dieppe, the B-25s sinking the first Nazi U-Boat, B-25s making the first raid on a Japanese position in the Philippines and the B-25 raid led by Jimmie Doolittle to bomb Tokyo. It continues by talking about how fast the North American company is able to turn out more and more of these effective weapons.
November 16, 1942
Life magazine
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North American Aviation
Full color 7 3/4" x 11" ad that highlights another of the many ways that the North American Aviation company is contributing to the effort to beat the Axis forces. The ad mentions two of the more widely-known planes produced by North American that were meeting with huge success in the actual battles, the P-51 Mustang and the B-25 Mitchell, but this ad talks about the AT-6 Texan, the most widely used combat trainer in the war. The ad claims that the "Pilots of 24 Nations train in "Texans"" and the left and right side of the ad are lined with the wing insignias of these countries. The ad claims that North American has built over 10,000 of these trainers, believed to be a record, and claims that they have designed in the same instrumentation for all three of their planes so, someone trained in the Texan will comfortably switch to either of the other two planes and be immediately successful. The ad has a drawing of a squadron of five of these planes "peeling off" as they train for duty. As all of their ads do, this one reminds us that "North American Sets the Pace!".
September 1943
Good Housekeeping
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North American Aviation
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that contains a drawing by Reynold Besswell of a victorious P-51 Mustang flying away from an enemy plane that is spiraling out of control in the background as flames burn on the right wing. The ad headline reassures us that "Mustangs Raise Hell in Heavens". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
March 13, 1944
Life magazine
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North American
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about the B-25 Mitchell Bomber. There is a painting of this plane attacking the enemy with guns blazing from every possible angle while the headline calls it a "15-gun salute from American Flyers". The lower picture shows a cutaway view of this plane and the location and functions of it's 5-man crew.. The text tells that it is being used againstGermany and Japan and that it has 6000 design improvements over the planes that General Doolittle took over Tokyo.
May 8, 1944
Life magazine
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North American Aviation
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the P-51 Mustang. At the top of the ad is a drawing by Reynold Jones showing a worried mother looking upward with a P-51 Mustang in the background. The ad headline describes this plane as the "Star of Hope for American Mothers". The bottom of the ad is devoted to a drawing of the plane with notations of each of it's features and mentioning it's speed, ceiling and radius of action. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 1944
McCall's
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime

North American Aviation
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that uses the P-51 Mustang to convince the readers that "North American Aviation sets the Pace". The ad has a drawing of two members of the ground crew loading fresh .50 calibre machine gun belts onto the wing guns of a P-51. Below this picture is a cutaway schematic that show many of the features that made this plane popular with Allied pilots and an object of fear to the enemy. The ad headline claims that "This Peace Talk Makes Sense". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 4, 1944
Life magazine
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North American
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that talks about another of the exploits of one of their products, the B-25 Mitchell Bomber, during World War II. The drawing in the ad shows a single B-25 pulling up after dropping bombs on a bridge that is filled with enemy tanks. The text tells how the waist gunner had to call the captain on the intercom and inform him that it would be necessary to "Take her up a bit, Captain, we're shipping water back here". It attributes this experience to the Skull and Wing Squadron in Burma which it claims was called the Burma Dental Clinic with "Bridge Busting our Specialty". The bottom picture explains the technique of skip-bombing which these planes were capable of doing with great ease and the skills of experienced pilots. At the very bottom of the ad it mentions "Planes That Make Headlines" including the P-51 Mustang Fighter, the B-25 and PBJ Mitchell Bomber and the AT-6 and SNJ Texan Combat Trainer.
February 5, 1945
Life magazine
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Oldsmobile
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for more of the efforts that Oldsmobile is investing in the war effort. This ad talks about the cannons and shells that have been produced and successfully fired at the enemy. The ad has a picture of the Official Insigne of the 500th Fighter-Bomber Squadron U.S. Army Air Force which is of a young man in a red and white striped shirt and blue shorts holding his nose as he dives toward the water while holding a bomb in his hand. The ad headline says "Sky-Diver with Bombs and Cannon!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 4, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Oldsmobile / Wartime


Oldsmobile
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Hydra-Matic Drive Automatic Trasnsmission. There is a large drawing of an M-24 Tank Built by Cadillac in action in a European town destroyed by warfare and a smaller drawing of a Blue Oldsmobile being driven in peacetime America. The ad headline lets us know that "Hydra-Matic Stands Up! in the Toughest Wartime Driving". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 2, 1945
Life magazine
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Oldsmobile
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for another of the products that Oldsmobile is supplying our armed forces. The ad headline calls it "Mine Sweeping - with heavy artillery!" and the ad has a sequence of drawings that show retreating German soldiers planting land mines in the area that the Allied soldiers will soon occupy. Before the Allied soldiers advance though they will lay a barrage of 105 mm shells in the area that are designed to cause these mines to explode safely before the troops come into contact with them. The text mentions that Oldsmobile is producing these and other rockets, cannons and shells. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 30, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
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Oldsmobile
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a copy of the Official Insigne of a Navy Dive-Bombing Squadron, the Hell-Razor squadron. The ad text describes how Oldsmobile is building the 20mm. automatic aircraft cannon used in these planes, cannons for other applications as well as heavy caliber shell and aircraft rockets. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 9, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Wartime / Oldsmobile

Pabst
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad is one of their Blue Ribbon Town series and features the Shopper of Blue Ribbon Town. The ad contains verses that give a slight indication of how difficult it was for women who worked in the War Plants and still took care of their families. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 20, 1943
Life magazine
1
$4.50
View Pabst 28

Packard
Full color 9 3/4" x 13" ad for the Packard built engines. There is a drawing of a fighter strafing an enemy train and a small drawing of the five types of aircraft that use the Packard built Rolls-Royce engines and the two boats that use Packard built Marine engines. The ad headline claims that these engines are "Built to Forget...that's why it will be long remembered. Ask the man who flies one." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not visible in the scanned view.
April 2, 1945
Life magazine
1
$4.50
View Wartime 16

Pepsodent
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their Tooth Powder and Tooth Paste. The ad has seven different photos that give advice on how to "not waste" tooth products and warning you of potential shortages. The ad headline warns you to "Keep your smile bright...but Don't Waste Pepsodent". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1942
Life magazine
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Philco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad has a photo of a U.S. Navy blimp flying over a convoy of ships crossing the Atlantic. The ad headline says "Fighting Today...To Give You Greater Joys Tomorrow!" and the text talks about how valuable their radio equipment has been in thwarting the enemy submarine threat. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Philco

Plymouth
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad has a photo of a wartime assembly plant with several men and one woman working on, what looks like, the undercarriage of an airplane. The ad has the headline torn out of a newspaper stating that "Plymouth Builds Great Cars" and contains the statement that it was "True Yesterday - In Trust for Tomorrow:. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 31, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
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Plymouth
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of a foot soldier smiling as he carries his rifle over his shoulder. The ad calls him, and all of the other soldiers, "The mightiest weapon of war" and the ad talks about some of the items that Plymouth is helping to build for the war effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 4, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
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Pontiac
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for some of Pontiac's wartime activities and efforts to help America win World War II. The ad mentions six different War Assignments that Pontiac was involved in: the Oerlikon 20-mm. Anti-Aircraft Cannon, the Aircraft Torpedoes for the Navy, the Bofors 40-mm. Field Guns, a variety of Diesel Engine Parts, Axles for M-5 Tanks and a variety of Engine Parts for Army Trucks This ad talks about the Aircraft Torpedoes which it starts by calling a Messenger of Death. The picture shows four sailors pushing a cart holding one of these weapons across the underdeck of a carrier and toward a plane waiting to be armed. The headline says that Pontiac is "Building Fast and Building Well...for Liberty" and the text talks about how these weapons are considered to be "the deadliest weapon of the sea" while at the same time is "the most difficult to manufacture". It also explains how they are used in warfare and talks about the power they contain while mentioning the 5222 intricate parts and 1225 complex assemblies within each unit.
August 30, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
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Pontiac
Three color 9 1/2" x 12" ad that talks about the Oerlikon 20 mm anti-aircraft cannons that were one of the items that Pontiac produced during the war. The ad has a drawing of what you would see if you were looking through the gun sights of one of these guns at the planes that you were responsible for protecting your ship from. The ad headline gives the slogan that was used by Pontiac during the war, "Pontiac - Building Fast and Building Well...for Liberty". The text describes the moments leading up to the enemy encounter and what the action was like as you fired what Pontiac was making instead of your family car. It admits that Pontiac began to produce thses "about a year before Pearl Harbor" which has helped Pontiac to improve different aspects of the operation and to make them less expensive to produce.
December 20, 1943
Life magazine
1
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Pontiac
Three color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad with the headline "While building these...Pontiac Reports...on the Record of Pontiac Motors...On the Record of Our Dealer Organization". There are drawings of six different types of wartime products that Pontiac is building to help America win the war. These include the Oerlikon 20-mm Anti-Aircraft Cannon, some Aircraft torpedoes for the Navy, 40-mm Automatic Field Guns, a variety of Diesel Engine Parts, Axles for M-5 Tanks and Engine Parts for Army Trucks. The text explains too that the lack of new cars and parts has demonstrated to everyone just how reliable and long-lasting the Pontiac has been since "in many areas, 75% or more of the war workers depend upon privately owned transportation". Pontiacs have held up well and the Dealers have made changes to assist everyone in doing what is necessary to keep their cars on the road.
January 31, 1944
Life magazine
1
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View Wartime / Pontiac

Price Control
Black and white 9" x 12" ad that encourages everyone to Keep Prices Down during the war years. There is a drawing that shows a beleagured Uncle Sam pulling on a rope that is attached to a hot air balloon that is labeled Prices. While he is doing this by himself there are various citizens labeled as groups involved in the economy arguing and pointing at each other shouting "He done it!". The headline in the ad counters by saying "Never mind "who done it" - pitch in and help get it down!" The text talks about the subtle rise in prices since the attack on Pearl Harbor and how the government has tried to keep prices down but now it is up to the public to make an effort too. The right side of the ad has a list of suggestions that will allow us to save money and to keep the economy rolling.
December 1943
Better Homes & Gardens
1
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Wartime 81

Public Health Committee of the Cup and Container Institute
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad that asks "Will you help your country head off epidemics?". The ad gives reasons and examples for "Why wartime and public health needs for paper cups and containers must come first". The ad discusses quick Overnight Moves which is when thousands of troops are suddenly jammed into trains and must be fed and served liquid refreshments. Paper cups and containers are the safest way to prevent the spread of germs. The second picture discusses Building EXTRA planes - with paper! with a line of men going into a plant and the security guards checking the lunch boxes of the men to make sure they have brought paper dispensers. The last picture shows a sinking aircraft carrier with the caption saying Ice Cream - in the Coral Sea. It explains that when the Lexington was sinking the sailors went over the side of the ship carrying paper cups of ice cream because paper cups were plentiful on all ships due to their ability to prevent the spread of germs. The text mentions how, during the First World War, more than ten times as many Americans were killed by the flu than by the enemy. For this reason it was important to keep the spread of germs under control.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$5.50
View Wartime 77

Pullman-Standard
Three color 9 3/4" x 13 3/4" ad that is devoted to the preparation for war. The ad headline, over a drawing of a tank and fighter planes, is "Speeding Production to preserve the 'American Way'" and the ad text discusses the types of products that are being produced by Pullman-Standard. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 28, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Wartime / Railroad

RCA
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Radio Equipment they continue to make, both for the soldiers to use for communication and for the families at home to keep informed and entertained. The top picture shows a flight cres with headphones on as they fly through heavy clouds and the headline says "In War - your War Bonds will buy radio equipment that helps our fighting flyers". The bottom picture shows a family relaxing in their living room as they listen to their RCA Radio and Phonograph and the headline says that "In Peace - your Savings will buy the greatest radios and phonographs in RCA history". As in so many other fields the technical improvements brought about by the necessity of war will be certain to amaze the buyers once peacetime finally comes.
April 10, 1944
Life magazine
1
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View Wartime / Radio

Rationing
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" photo taken from an overhead view of a city street lined up with people waiting for their turn. You can't see where their goal is but the line goes down a long block and turns the corner as they waited their turn to buy two packs of cigarettes. The people in this long line seem polite, organized and willing to patiently wait.
February 12, 1945
Life magazine
1
$6.00
View Wartime 63

Remington
Full color 7 1/4" x 10 1/2" wartime ad with a picture of a soldier sleeping on the ground smiling as he dreams the picture overhead. His dream is of a younger, more innocent boy hiding in the weeds with his dog and gun waiting for the ducks to bring themselves into position for him to shoot. The ad headline says "Let's hope it's soon, soldier!" and the text gives a pep talk about the freedoms that we and the rest of the free world were fighting for. It then lists some of the items that Remington had recently produced for the war effort and that they had received four Army-Navy E Awards for their work.
July 1943
Sports Afield
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Republic Steel
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" wartime ad that discusses some of the reasons that fighting and winning World War II was necessary. There is a painting of a family room where a family of four is gathered around a radio that the young son is earnestly trying to tune. The headline says that "In Germany they'd shoot us for this!" and explains that the freedom to receive unfiltered news is a right that Americans have been able to expect. The text mentions nothing in the way of advertising for Republic Steel but rather talks about the Freedom of Enterprise that Americans enjoy and the amazing amount of production that has been realized during this wartime period and how it needs to continue. It ends with the words "Let's keep America America".
August 1943
Country Gentleman
1
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View Republic / Wartime ad

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad that has a drawing of a policeman running toward a man who is working on his typewriter with a handsaw and other incorrect tools. The ad text talks about how important each and every typewriter is to the war effort and how important it is to have them working correctly. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be vislble in the scanned view.
May 31, 1943
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Office Machine 15

Schick
Black and white 5 1/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their Injector Razors. This wartime ad states that "If you own a Schick Injector Razor...you can start cheering" and announces that "Schick Injector Blades are back". The text explains that "Months ago many of you had to lay aside your Schick Injector Razors. At that time, Government Priorities required all the blades we could make for the armed forces. But now our production is sufficient for both military and civilian needs". The ad reminds all users of the "revolutionary Schick Injector features" and asked everyone to "Tell your friends that these blades are back". It urged anyone that had a spare Schick Injector Razor to give it to a friend that didn't have one because, even though the blades were now available, "we still can't get the material for new Schick Injector Razors".
January 24, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Men's Grooming / Wartime

Scotch Tape
Three color 9 1/2" x 14" ad that explains one of the more unusual ways this company was helping the war effort. Early in the war there was a fear of the enemy using a Blister Gas which would be dropped from planes flying overhead on soldiers marching below. The chemical engineers designed a pouch that soldiers could carry and pull out and cover themselves up for safety while still continue to march. The pouch was large enough to cover their packs and rifles from this vapor that was capable of burning its way through a soldier's uniform. The seams of this pouch were carefully and completely sealed with Scotch Tape. There is a picture of a soldier wearing one of these pouches and looking overhead at planes with German markings discharging some of this deadly material. The ad does mention that Scotch Tape is doing other things to help the war effort and hopes you will understand the shortage of their products in the store.
September 20, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime ' Scotch Tape

Scott
Full color 9" x 13" ad for their Scottissue and Scottowels. This ad is identified as being "...one of a series of Scott Paper Company wartime service pages to enlist the co-operation of your child in helping you these war-busy days". The headline over a drawing of three children and a dog marching in perfect step says that "We want to be Drafted too!". It goes from there to three drawings that show children picking up with the captions "Leave the basin neat", "Keep food and feet off chairs and couches" and to "Put your books away". The ad also contains a coupon to be sent with a nickel ro receive your Official Clean-Up Warden Arm Band.
November 16, 1942
Life magazine
1
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View Scott / Wartime ad

Scrap Metal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" photo that illustrates the need for the general public to contribute an unnecessary metal to the war effort. The picture shows columnist Westbrook Pegler who has obviously written of the importance of this, taking the rear bumper off of his own car so that it can be turned into something more relevant for the country.
October 5, 1942
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 62

Sergeant's Dog Medicines
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that features a very cute painting done by Lynn Bogue Hunt of a sad looking spaniel looking over a fence and has an ad headline saying "I can wait". The ad text describes the thoughts of this animal as he watched his owner leaving without him because "this year it's a different kind of hunting season-the biggest one there ever was, I guess". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the edges of the ad do not show up on the scanned view.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
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Shell
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of three Navy planes working together to sink a sub. The drawing, which is labeled as the 'Fifth in a series of advertisements', shows two Wildcats strafing the decks to clear them of antaircraft gunners while the Avenger prepares to come in a drop depth charges. The ad headline describes this as "One, Two, Three and out goes he". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime 37

Stokley's
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Tomato Juice. Pictured in the ad is a drawing of three hands holding up glasses of Stokley's Tomato Juice in, what the headline calls, "A toast...to Freedom". The text claims that this is one of the products that Uncle Sam has recommended as a nutritional food that will keep Americans "fighting fit". The ad talks about the Stokley plants working day and night to put up field rations for the soldiers in action which are more tasty and nutritious than the hardtack of days gone by.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
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Studebaker
Full color 10" x 13" ad has a drawing of a cloud covered sky with several Flying Fortresses. The ad headline informs us that "Swarms of Flying Fortresses fly on Studebaker-built Cyclone engines". There is a smaller drawing of Army trucks built by Studebaker. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 24, 1943
Life magazine
1
$4.50
View Wartime 2

Studebaker
Studebaker Quality - Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that illustrates how not even World War II could disable the family teams that Studebaker has used to build pride and responsibility into their worksmanship. This ad tells the story of the Connell family of South Bend, long-time employees of Studebaker. The ad has a drawing of the two brothers, George in his Marine uniform and Francis in his Navyuniform facing each other on an airfield filled with soldiers getting ready to lift off in the planes behind them. There is a smaller picture of their father, Charles R who is working on wone of the engines that will be installed in one of our airships, possibly even one of the ones that one of his sons may be up in. The text talks about the comfort that any soldier who has worked at a Studebaker plant will feel at knowing that the engines on the plane that he was flying were built with the same standard of quality that they put into the cars they were building, so few years before. The ad mentions that Studebaker's war effort included being the Builder of Wright Cyclone engines for the Boeing Flying Dortress, big multiple-drive military trucks and other vital war material.
1944 Life magazine
1
$5.50
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Texaco
Full color 10" x 13" wartime ad that reminds us what the real reason for fighting this war was. The drawing shows a young man trying to carry a rifle, knife, uniform, helmet, boots and every thing else that is issued to a soldier when he joins the Army. The ad headline has him explaining that "I'm fighting for my right to boo the Dodgers" and the text mentions, among other things, some of the products that The Texas Company is producing to contribute to the war effort. It talks about how everyone is working to win this war, whether as soldiers or producing necessary products at home.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
2
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Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" wartime ad that pays tribute to the many soldiers that were fighting to retain our freedom and to the many ways that the people at home can help too, Pictured in the ad are 23 different ribbons as examples of some of what were being awarded to soldiers in our service. The headline reminds us that they are "YOUR battles, too!" and said that "Perhaps you helped win them". It mentions donating blood, not using rubber so that more is available to the soldiers and using less gasoline in order to help "our armies drive on to Berlin". It also, as usual, mentions buying War Stamps and that The Texas Company is producing "millions of gallons of 100-octane gasoline...toulene for explosives...high quality lubricating oils for our fighting forces". Lest the 100-octane statement confuse you, that was what was available for the military and their high performance engines, the people on the home front were mostly using a combination of gasoline and benzene.
August 30, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Texaco 55

Texaco
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for one of the Wartime Efforts made by this company. The ad has a picture of a large drop of oil with a tire in the middle of it. The ad headline proclaims "Miracle...in Texas" and the ad discusses how Texaco is producing Synthetic Rubber to help the victory effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 31, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime 27 / Texaco

Thompson Products, Inc.
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad has a drawing that is showing what an American sub captain would see as he looks through his periscope as a Japanese destroyer chases him after he has torpedoed three other destroyers. The ad headline is "Third down...and One to go" and the ad talks about how the workers at their plants "have some 'part' - a vital part -in every land, sea, and air action against the enemy". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 33

United States Rubber Company
Black and white 9 1/2 x 13 1/2" ad that talks about their Laytex Assault Wire. There are several pictures that show scouts traveling up to five miles ahead of their forces and being able to radio back information for an attack. It talks about the features of this product and how it is not affected by moisture or temperature.
January 24, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 67

United States Rubber Company
Black and white 9 3/4" x 12 1/2" ad that describes the "bullet-sealing fuel cells" they have designed for use in our war planes. The ad headline lets us know that this is being done so "that men may Live to build a better world". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 13, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 41

United States Rubber Company
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that explains how Thread has a different use during wartime. The ad has a picture of an older lady in 1941 working with Bedspread Yarn. Lying on top of her project is a belt of machine gun bullets that curves across the ad past a machine gunner in an airplane. The ad headline refers to "The thread that reached the sky" and explains how the Textile Division of U.S. Rubber was formed to provide things like thread and other fabrics for the war effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 30, 1945
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 51

United States Steel
Three color 9" x 12 1/2" ad that answers the question, "What your junk will make". There are eight pictures of items commonly found rusting away in garages or basements and the caption under each describes what it can be converted to in order to help the war effort. The text explains the many different ways to turn your scrap in, sometimes for money, and get it on its way to United States Steel so that it can be turned into something useful that may save lives.
September 1942
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Wartime / U.S. Steel

Vinco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their gages and other precision equipment that make many fantastic methods of combat possible. The procedure that is explained in this ad is Skip-Bombing which is made realistic by the availability of tools of precision from Vinco. Mention is made of, since Pearl Harbor, Vinco working with major armanent manufacturers and others to smooth over difficult problems.
February 21, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime 68

War Bonds
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad with a photo of a somber Bob Hope asking people to avoid buying non-essential items and to buy and hold all the War Bonds they can afford. The headline quote has Bob saying that if you do otherwise, "It doesn't make sense, folks". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 9, 1945
Life magazine
1
$4.50
View Bob Hope 6

War Production Board
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that was to inform the public about the need to recycle during World War II. The ad headline says this is a "Quiz on Junk" and has many pieces of information about what household items will convert to what battleground needs. It describes the network that scrap travels through to become useful. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1942
Life magazine
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Western
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their World Champion Ammunition. In the foreground of this picture is a soldier lying prone on the ground sighting in preparation to firing his rifle and the background of the picture is a laughing young boy holding his rifle as rabbits run away from him. The ad headline says that "Now, He shoots for Freedom" and the ad explains that all of the experience that young boys got shooting their guns with Western Ammunition is now helping them perform as soldiers and fight for Freedom. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 13, 1944
Life magazine
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Western
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/" ad for their World Champion Ammunition. There is a picture of an older man looking up at a flock of geese glying by and a more distinct picture of a soldier also looking up at the sky and they both have a trail of Western Shotgun Shells running between them. The headline says "Look to the Sky..." and the text talks about the thrills of being an anti-aircraft gunner but admits that this young man longs for the peacetime when he can return to his favorite duck marsh. The text describes the thrills of a day of duck hunting and promises that the powerful Western Super-X ammunition will be able to reach those higher flying birds to ensure you have a successful day.
September 18, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Wartime / Firearms

Western Electric
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that indicates that the development of Radar has been released for publication. There is a close-up photo of the eyes of a cat and the headline refers to these as being "Equipment for Combat". The text mostly talks about now having the ability to "pierce the black of night, the depths of the ocean and the clouded skies" as the main uses with more to come. It also mentions the use of this in peacetime which has proven to be a fact.
May 31, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Telephone

Western Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a drawing by Paul Rabut that shows an Army Field Headquarters with a staff officer sitting outside with a phone to his ear and a terrain map spread out in front of him. This ad is listed as No. 10 of a series, General Staff. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Telephone

Western Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" wartime ad that shows how the Western Electric products are being used by the Navy. The ad has a copy of a painting entitled Air Defense - South Pacific that is done by U.S. Navy Combat Artist Dwight Shepler that shows a battleship defending itself against attacking planes. The ad headline is "Nerve Systems for Battle Wagons" and the text goes into some detail about the systems that were in use for communications within the ship. At the bottom of the ad is a sideview schematic of a typical battleship that illustrates the communication layout. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 4, 1944
Life magazine
1
$5.00
View Telephone / Wartime

Western Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a drawing by Paul Rabut that shows an artilleryman using his switchboard and talking on his telephone as they fire away at unseen targets. This drawing is No. 14 of a series, Field Artillery and the ad mentions that each time a Long Tom is fired it costs $37.78. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 22, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Telephone

Westinghouse
Black and white 9" x 12 1/2" ad has a large drawing of a shipyard where a winch is lowering a shaft onto the deck of an aircraft carrier. The ad headline describes the action as "How to turn a hull into a hornet's nest" and the text describes many of the ways that the expertise of Westinghouse is helping to make our aircraft carriers better. It talks about how Westinghouse uses their "know-how" to provide all the different types of power that are needed on ships of this type. Their slogan in this ad is "making Electricity work for Victory".
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
2
$5.00
View War Time 5










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