TV Equipment Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.


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BRAND
DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
IMAGE
PAYPAL
Admiral
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Home Entertainment Sets. Pictured in this ad is a set made from a dark wood and coming with a Two-Speed Phonograph, a Magic Mirror Television and an FM-AM Radio. The text indicates that this unit has a "big 10" direct view screen" and talks about other features that, at that time, were worth bragging about. There is a price given for this unit of $499.95 and on the side are pictures with information of a Table Model FM-AM Radio and Automatic Phonograph for $99.95 and a 3-Way Portable radio for $34.95.
October 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 67

Admiral
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for their complete Home Entertainment System. The ad has a picture of a formally dressed man sitting in a tiger-skinned chair watching a boxing match on this unit while two other equally dressed men stand laughing at his intensity. Beside having the television set on the doors revealing the record turntable, the radio tuner and the storage space for records are all open. The headline calls this "Complete Home Entertainment All in One Luxurious Console" and gives a price of $499.95 before the text goes into details of the unit itself.
November 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 37

Admiral
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Triple Thrill Home Entertainment System. There is a well-appointed room with a White Walnut Unit being admired by three formally dressed ladies. The text mentions that it comes with an FM-AM Radio, a 2-Speed Phonograph and a Magic Mirror Television and it mentions a price for this unit of $549.50. The text goes on to more completely describe the capabilities of each piece of this unit and there is a smaller picture in the bottom of the ad that shows a similar unit of dark wood with the doors all closed.
December 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 64

Admiral
Full color 9 3/4" x 14" ad for their Television Receivers. The ad has a picture of a stylish lady looking over her shoulder at the Model 321K18 with a Twenty inch Television Screen. The ad lists some of the features of their combinations and claims that prices start at $349.95, excise tax included. They make the claim to having "The clearest Picture in Television". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 2, 1951
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 21

Admiral
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that discusses how "Admiral brings three new major improvements to color television". Descriptions are included in the ad for how they have attained 1) Greater Dependability, 2) More Natural Color and 3) New Easier Tuning. Shown in the ad are The Chanceford Model L1629 and The Courtney Model L1311. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Television 28

Admiral
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their 19-inch Portables. There is a large picture showing three of the models being offered and the headline promises that "Now, 19-inch portables look smarter, last longer, work better". Shown in the picture are the Catalina (P9750 Series), the Spectator (P9640 Series) and the Futura (P9430 Series) all with a starting price of $139.95. The text mentions some of the new features such as a 82-channel tuner, a steelbond picture tube and a 20,000-volt precision chassis. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 8, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 45

Admiral
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Home Entertainment Centers with Color TV's. Shown in the ad is a Model SMDU2221 Copenhagen set and there are smaller pictures showing the Television controls, the turntable and the radio dial. After discussing some of the important features of these sets the text gives a price starting at $795.
September 18, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 77

Admiral
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Improved Color Television Set. Pictured in the ad is their Deauville LDU2179 model and the top drawing shows the Tilt-In / Tilt-Out controls that make the lines of this television very appealing. The text talks about some of the improvements like the Admiral Color Fidelity Control and their Automatic Degausser.
October 23, 1964
& January 22, 1965
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Television 76

Admiral
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Color Television Sets. The ad has a large picture of the 25" Channing Model LG5511 in a living room with a picture of a beautiful lady dressed in red on the screen. The ad headline begins "Why your first Color TV should be an Admiral" and list four reasons with explanations. The ad lists that You'll see the finest color quality ever, that You'll have unequaled ease of tuning, that You'll enjoy long, trouble-free use and that You'll get big 25" rectangular pictures, new slim cabinets.
September 10, 1965
January 14, 1966
&
January 28, 1966
Life magazine
4
$7.50
View Television 29

Admiral
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their 25" Rectangular Color TV Sets. The ad headline introduces the "New Admiral 25" Rectangular Color TV in slim new cabinets" and the ad contains pictures of three different models being offered. There is a large picture of The Coronado Model LK6553 with it's Spanish Provincial styling and smaller pictures of The Newport Model LK6541 with it's Danish Modern styling and the Color Stereo Theater Model SMKS6515 complete with radio and changer. The ad shows the Admiral Tilt-Out Control Center and talks about the Sonar Remote Control. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 16, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 42

Admiral
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that says that "Admiral gives you the only 3-year warranty on the color picture tube - and at no extra cost". There is a well-dressed woman standing next to a Continental Model SLS598 23-inch set and she is feeling the door on the set as though it was cotton. Other sets shown are the Jefferson Model 3L365 23-inch and the Nording Model 3L371 23-inch. The ad says that the warranty offered "can save you $125 to $200 in color tube replacement, depending on screen size - and it's good in all 50 states". They state that the exclusive Admiral offer is one year better than anyone elses. And they state that most televisions have their picture tubes go bad in the third year.
November 12, 1968
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Television 81

Belmont
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" wartime ad meant to ensure the public that Belmont would be producing televisions with the same quality that their radios have been known for. The ad has a drawing of a little boy watching a baseball game on a set that has a pop-up picture and the caption claims that "By showing a black and white picture on the television screen in the above illustration, Belmont is being realistic. This is the type of picture you can expect to see. But when television in color is ready and practical, Belmont will have it for you". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 21, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 15

Capehart
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Television sets with Capehart Tone and Polatron Picture Perfection. This ad contains pictures of the Capehart Nocturne, a set with a 16-inch television picture and another of a unit with a radio and phonograph. The text talks about the sound technology from International Telephone and Telegraph that has long been used in audio equipment but is now, for the first time, being used in Television Sets.. It also mentions that their television receivers start in price at $269.50.
March 1950
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 62

Capehart
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their World-Famous Tone. There is a picture of a unit called The Capehart - De luxe Series sitting in a living room complete with a 16-inch Polatron picture, AM-FM radio and 3-way phonograph. The text alks about the Tone which is "a new dimension brought to television by International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation through its associate, Capehart-Farnsworth Corporation". There is another picture of a unit that looks to be a radio and phonograph combination ant the text indicates that their products started in price at $269.50.
May 1950
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 61

Capehart
Full color 10" x 13" ad for what they claim to be "The World's Finest Instrument for Home Entertainment". There is a large picture of the Capehart New Englander television set with the doors closed so the set itself is not visible but the French Provincial styling of the sturdy cabinet is. There is another, smaller picture of this set with the doors opened and a picture visible on the set. The ad has another picture of the Capehart Hepplewhite Phonograph-Radio and a description of what it is capable of. In several places in the ad these products from the Capehart-Farnsworth Corporation are referred to as being the Best. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 27, 1951
Look magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 25

CBS
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad with Jackie Gleason for their replacement vacuum tubes. The ad has a large picture of the face of Jackie Gleason and a picture of a television that has lost it's vertical hold. The ad headline warns that "When your TV picture 'acts up', Here's one way Women can be sure of quality TV repairs" and the text tells you to "Just ask your serviceman for CBS Tubes". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 9, 1955
Life magazine
1
$4.50
View Gleason / CBS Tubes

Crosley
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Ultra-Fidelity TV. The ad has a picture of a grandmother sitting in her chair while her grandson lies at her feet watching Howdy Doody on a Crosley 16" with doors. There is a smaller picture of a Crosley 12 1/2" Console with doors in the lower right hand of the ad. The ad headline, referring to the TV sets, claims "Design? It's superb! Performance? It's marvelous!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 16, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 20

Crosley
Black and white 10" x 13" ad tells you about the "Crosley Full Room Vision". This wonderful feature "puts every seat on the 50-yard line". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 6, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 3

Dumont
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for their . The ad has a sketch of a couple sitting and watching a clear drawing of a television set, identified as a Du Mont Bradford, and the text claims that they have "the largest direct-view screen made". This unit also has an FM radio and a record player too.
October 1949
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 36

Du Mont
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for the Du Mont Televisions. The picture drawn by Mr. Rockwell shows a very happy family of four and the headline states that "The greatest joys are shared". The first sentence of the text issues a sentiment that is often disputed in the present, "There is great happiness in television...great happiness". The text talks about Du Mont having built the first commercial television receiver and still builds the best.
August 1950
National Geographic
1
$9.00
View Rockwell / Du Mont

Du Mont
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad for what having a new Du Mont television in your home will give you. There is a drawing by Norman Rockwell of a Christmas morning where two young children and their dog have turned away from a pile of presents recently opened and are watching their television which is taking them to "Enchanted lands...right in your home". The text gives a few details about what this brand of television will give you and there is a smaller picture that shows a larger view of this scene so you can see that these two children are watching a Westminster II set with a 19-inch picture.
December 1950
National Geographic
1
$9.00
View Television / Rockwell

General Electric
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Model 801 Console Unit with a picture of Cleveland Indians Pitcher Bob Feller going into his windup. The ad headline claims that if you buy this Television Set, "You'll be close up when Feller pitches!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 4, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Feller / GE

General Electric
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their Black-Daylite Television. The ad photo shows a little girl trying to feed a dog biscuit to a dog on her television screen. The ad headline claims that "G.E. makes you feel it's real!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 29, 1951
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Television 4

Temporarily
Sold Out

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their televisions with the Black-Daylight technology. The ad headline claims that "New 17 inch G-E puts new life in Life-Size" and has a picture of a little girl holding a square frame around her face as she mimics a lady who is appearing on the Model 17C103 G. E. set next to her. The ad mentions a price of $319.95 for this set and describes some of it's features. Below this picture are samples of the Model 17T2 which is a 17" Table Model that was sold for $289.95 and the Model 16K1 16" TV - Radio - Phonograph which sold for $499.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 26, 1951
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Television 23

Temporarily
Sold Out

General Electric
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their Aluminized Tubes. The ad has a picture of William Bendix, the star of the popular NBC show, The Life of Riley, and shows how well he will look when your television set is able to take advantage of the Aluminized Reflecting Surface and the Glowing Phosphor Surface that comes with this product. The ad headline claims that if you want "To see the Real Life of Riley, change to this new G-E Tube". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 5, 1953
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Bendix / GE

General Electric
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for their 4 new Television Models. The ad headline states "4 Great New TV Stars from $129.95" and the ad refers to them as lo-boys and pacers. The ad has pictures that show models 21C152 and 21C156 in the lo-boy category and models 17T21 and 21C108 in the pacers category. The ad discusses the fact that it was felt that pictures low to the ground give the most "natural-angle viewing" and how these sets also had "round-the-room wide-angle viewing".
March 1955
National Geographic
2
$8.00
View Television 35

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their popular Portable Televisions. There is a picture of a living room where the father is sitting back comfortably watching a show on his General Electric floor model television while his young son grasps the handle of a Model 14T017 portable that is sitting nearby and says of the set that the father is watching, "It's all yours, Dad...I'll take the General Electric Portable!". The text shows a variety of places that it can be used, mentions that it weighs only 26 pounds and discusses other features of this and other portables. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 48

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the realistic picture that you will get with you General Electric Color Television. The ad has a a picture of an unidentified General Electric television with a close-up of a lady with blonde hair and wearing a red coat and hat. Behind this set is this same lady holding a gun while standing in front of a male body lying on the floor. The ad headline claims that "If they send you an ash-blonde spy in a scarlet cape with a silver French automatic...that's exactly what you get/". The ad text, while describing the wonderful color reproductionn, mentions that "their etched-circuit boards are guaranteed for life". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Television 27

General Electric
Full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad shows five different models with descriptions. The model shown at the top of the page has a scene from the movie "The Undefeated" with John Wayne prominent on the screen. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 31, 1969
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Television 8

Temporarily
Sold Out

Hitachi
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Quality designed and built into their Portables. The headline claims that Hitachi "brings you a new innovation in portables." Pictured are several of their products on a blanked spread out on the ground, the TWA-1000 Portable Television, the Auto-9 Portable Radio and the TRQ-330 Portable Tape Recorder. The text describes how their products last and last and last. This is made possible by the fact that they have someone checking after every seven workers on the line and they are always checking the checkers. They only make Portables and they include the best of features in their products.
August 27, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 78

Hotpoint
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their New Concept in Television Pleasure. They called it Hi-Vi TV and claimed that "Trapped light beams and enriched sound waves bring new pleasure to television viewing". Shown in the ad, in color pictures, are the Brilliant 21" Table Model 21S401, the Amazing 13-lb Portable 9S101 and the Fully Automatic 21" Console 21S552. The text makes claims about how much better their sets are than the competitions and about the features they have in their sets starting in price at $99.95.
October 1, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 54

Hotpoint
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their Portable Hi-Vi TV's. The ad has a black and white picture of a family's living room where several people are sitting on the couch watching and a lady is lying on the carpeted floor eating a sandwich while she tries to cover one eye from the tension on the screen. The ad has a headline of "Here are 3 of 7 colorful Portables in Hotpoint's complete line of all-new TV sets" over a picture that has a 13-lb portable (Model 9S102), a 14" portable (Model 14S203) and the 17" Hi-Vi Portable (Model17S301). The ad claims that prices for their portable TV's start at $99.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 15, 1956
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Television 19

Temporarily
Sold Out

Magnavox
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for some of the features available in their sets. The ad has a picture with several couples gathered in a modern-style showing their surprise at the Model 552 unit ($995) and the way it looks and sounds. The ad headline assures us that "Only Magnavox combines Mangacolor and Astro-Sonic Stereo Hi-Fi in one family-entertainment theatre". The ad text talks about some of what went into these units to make them sound so good and present such a good picture.
December 6, 1963
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 30

Motorola
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for their Living Room Theatre. There is a larger picture of a family watching the picture on the Model VF103 which it describes as being a 6 in ONE unit. These six functions are listed as being 1) Television in a big screen, 2) Automatic Phonograph for new "Long Playing" records, 3) Automatic Phonograph for standard records, 4) FM Radio, 5) AM Radio and 6) Roomy Record Storage Space. The ad also has smaller pictures of other products such as the Model VK106 Television Consolette, the Model VT105 Table model Television, the Model VT71 Television, the Model 78FM22 Radio/Record Player, the Model 68F11 Table Radio/Phonograph, the Model 5A7A Playmate Jr. and the Model 58R11 Table Radio.
October 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 34

Motorola
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for their Television Sets. Under the headline urging you to "Give your family a new thrill this Christmas morning Motorola TV" is a picture of a Model 17F1 playing a show with Santa Claus to the enjoyment of a young boy and girl and an assortment of their stuffed animals. There is another, smaller picture of this unit with all of the doors opened up so that readers can view the other accessories and the text gives a general description of it's capabilities and some of the other units available.
December 1950
National Geographic
2
$8.00
View Television 33

Motorola
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the fact that besides making a good television, Motorola was making a piece of fine furniture. There is a picture of a lady wearing an evening dress standing next to with her gloved hand resting on a Model 21K7 set. The headline advises "To the woman who knows a fine piece of furniture when she sees it...Better See Motorola TV". The text talks about the cabinets, all 31 distinctive models, and mentions that they only have two simple controls, the One-Knob Tuning and the new Channel-light.
October 1952
McCall's
1
$8.00
View Television 51

Motorola
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for some of the amazing improvements on their Motorola Americana Portable Television. The largest picture shows the entire set while two smaller pictures concentrate on features they want to call your attention to. The headline says that "The handle is to tune with!" and the inset picture shows the two knobs located on the right side of the handle that control four functions. The bottom inset picture shows "...a new exclusive Super-sensitive antenna!" being extended by a female hand. The text explains that you will now be able to "see" the television screen while you are making changes to the controls and that you will get "big screen, big sound, big convenience and beauty". The ad mentions that the model shown is 14P11-2 which has a 14" diaganal picture tube,
April 22, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 72

Motorola
Three color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their amazing Portables. The headline says "From Motorola The Most in a Portable" and the set shown has a picture of a missle taking off. The ad shows their Model 17P6 which was a 17" set with other information given in the ad. The ad claims these portables are "The Most reliable portable TV ever" and they have "The Most in performance, too" and the text gives a lot of the credit to the exclusive Golden 'M' Frame Grid Tube.
October 19, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 59

Motorola
Full color 10" x 13" ad that tells you that "When you buy a new color TV, get one with a rectangular color tube - Motorola". The top picture shows an attic full of things that are never seen and one of them is a circular picture tube. There is another picture, lower right side, that contains things that should be seen, the Model D23CK38 Motorola. About this set it is said that "Contemporary styling that's in step with the times. Has Motorola's new 23" rectangular color tube (23" overall diag. tube meas. 274 sq. in. picture viewing size). Has push-button demagnetizer". They bring up three areas of improvements in the new Motorola. The first is the New Tube which is because of the Motorola Color/65. They claim that you can enjoy the new, full-screen view. The second is the New Slim Cabinets. This tube is five inches shorter than the old circular color tubes. They also have a Color Indicator Light to assist the fine-tuning. And third there is the Proved Dependability that every Motorola Color/65 has a hand-wired power transformer chassis.
November 7, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Television 85

Motorola
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their "All-Rectangular Line with solid state reliability". Calling this "the new flight of Color Television" the text talks about some of the features that now come standard. Shown in the ad are a Color TV/Stereo combination with sliding doors, a Console with warm Early American styling and a Super Compact table model as the text mentions 3 big rectangular screen sizes and more than 40 cabinet models. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 16, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 44

Packard Bell
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the fact that their Televisions look good enough to be considered furniture. The headline, under a picture of a unit identified as a CP-964 Sorrento Mediterranean Imperial Pecan for $725 standing alone on a brown-hued floor, says that "Most companies don't consider a color TV a piece of furniture. As you can see, we do" The text begins by discussing some of the painstaking methods they use for construction of the cabinets and dismisses a need to say much about the set itself because "Packard Bell color television sets rank among the most advanced in the industry".
November 18, 1969
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 69

Philco
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the Philco Balanced Beam Television. This ad shows the television chassis and the complete cabinet. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 8, 1951
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Television 1

Temporarily
Sold Out

Philco
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for the introduction of their Golden Grid Tuner. There is a drawing of the chassis of a Philco television and the headline says this tuner "Makes TV's greatest 'Power Plant' still greater than ever!" and claims that it is "Just like a Boost in Station Power", something that those of us who remember the early days of television appreciate the importance of. The ad calls this "The First High Fidelity Television ever built for the American Public", talks about the sensitivity and power and claims that it is "Designed for Built-In All Channel UHF". Off to the side is a picture of the Philco Model 2287 and the caption talks about some of the features of this and other units and mentions prices from $199.95 to $845.00
September 15, 1952
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 56

Philco
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for their televisions with "Automatic Top Touch Tuning". The picture shows a lady with the long dress of the time standing next to the television and putting her finger on the outside corner as the ad says "Touch! There's your station". The ad has a banner that says "Jan. 5 Philco automatic Top Touch Tuning never before less that $289.95 now yours brand new for only $199.95 A big $90 less for the only photo perfect TV that tunes itself at these new low prices don't settle for less than a Philco". There is another picture that shows a pair of human hands holding something in both of their hands and fiddling with it. Unfortunately it has a cord to it that seems to go from there to the television.
January 9, 1956
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Philco 83

Philco
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for their Seventeener Portable Television. Across the top of the page is the claim that this set "Packs the 'Picture Punch' of a Console" and shows a slim lady with a smile on her face holding this set in one hand. The ad shows the Philco 3034 set and gives the dimensions of the screen. It calls these sets "The Long Distance Champion of Portables" and talks about the Solarized Filter Lens, the Bantam Power Plant and the Outrigger Aerial. The text mentions a starting price for these television sets of as little as $119.95 and talks about the Rough Rider 3-way portable radio which had a starting price of $29.95, less batteries.
August 20, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 53

Philco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their sets that now have the Scan-Tenna which is described as a "39-inch antenna (which) hides in rotating handle". The larger picture shows it being extended to different lengths and pointed in different directions to allow you to "pull-in" those faraway stations on the other side of town. The text says this is available on all Philco portables starting as low as $139.95. There is also a picture of the Sportster 96 model with a clear picture without the antenna extended. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 50

Philco
Full color 10" x 13" ad shows several different of the Slender Seventeener television. The ad headline claims that "You have never seen a table TV like this". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 26, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 6

Philco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Portables. The headline, over a picture of a happy lady watching a variety show on her portable, calls them "America's most wanted portable...and no wonder". The caption says the set she is watching is their Model 3055 which comes with a remote control and calls these sets the "Slimmest, lightest, most compact - priced from $159.95". There is another picture that shows the remote that was mentioned and says that with this it "changes channels with merely a squeeze" and another picture shows the Philco Safari which they called the "World's First Transistor Portable TV!".
October 19, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 57

Philco
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for their Vivid Vision Television sets. The ad announces this by saying that "Philco Cool-Chassis TV brings you a totally new viewing experience". The text goes through an adjective-filled description of what Philco believes the viewers will see when they sit in front of this unit. In this ad is shown a Philco 4854 Italian Provincial in Renaissance Mahogany.
November 3, 1961
Life magazine &
November 18, 1961
Saturday Evening Post
2
$7.50
View Television 43

Philco
Three color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their patented Cool Chassis. The top ad headline informs us that "TV sets don't wear out - they burn out" and they remedy that fact by saying that "Only Philco has the patented Cool Chasis. Beats the heat, major cause of TV breakdowns. Gives greater dependability - longer TV life!". To show what a TV with a Cool Chassis looks like there is a picture of the Philco Town House TV - The Nob Hill with a short list of features on this unit. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 22, 1963
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 12

Philco
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Cool Chassis. The ad has a picture of a Dutchboy Pennsylvania Dutch Provincial cabinet under the headline that warns us that "TV sets don't wear out - they burn out! Only Philco has the patented Cool Chassis. Beats the heat, major cause of TV breakdowns. Gives greater dependability - longer TV life." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Television 26

Philco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about their 20/20 Color Vision Television Sets. Shown in the ad is a Model 5434-CH set in a French Provencial style. The headline claims that "You are looking at today's Most Exciting Advance in Color TV" and the text talks about some of the more important features on these sets. The ad claims that the 20/20 Color Vision is "rivaled only by nature".
September 18, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 75

Philco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Color TV's. The ad has a picture of a Philco Television with a colorful picture and two men talking while one holds his happy kids. The headline over these scenes says "So you told your next-door neighbor you're not getting color tv until somebody gets the bugs our of it? Better get a new story. Or a new Philco" and the text talks about the amazing changes that have been made in the Philco sets. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view,
November 12, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 32

Philco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that announces that someone has finally made a 19" color portable and that someone is Philco. Over a picture of a happy little girl standing in a robe that goes to her feet is a picture of Philco's new 19" Color Portable and the words warning "So you told your kids you're not getting Color TV until somebody makes a portable? Better get a new story. Or a new Philco". The text discusses the value of this product, the quality built into each unit and the amazing performance given by this and every other Philco product.
March 25, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 71

Philco
Black and white 10" x 13" ad that feels and said that "We think it's high time somebody made a family-size color tv that the average family can afford". This is what Philco has set their mind on doing. The ad starts off with "One of the great things about America is that good living is not reserved for the rich alone". The first highlighted phrase in this ad says "$299.95 big-screen color". Not bad. The next highlighted phrase says that it can be had for "About $14 a month". They claim that that means that you can have one and get it paid off in just two years. Then they mention some of the other models: $349.95, $379.95 and $399.95. It kind of makes you think again when you look at the picture at the end of the ad, the one with the pretty lady resting her hand on the Television set that has a $299.95 price tag on it.
July 28, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Television 84

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for two of their new Television Sets. The ad has a picture of the RCA Victor 8T270 and describes what features you will enjoy with this set after paying your $495.00. There is a smaller picture of a smaller set, the RCA Victor 8TR29 which was a table-model that was a television set combined with an AM-FM radio. The ad mentions some of the features and a price of $375.00. The prices listed for both of these items mention that Installation was extra. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 9, 1949
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 17

RCA Victor
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for four of their Television Sets. The ad has a picture of a lady standing next to their Model 17T160 Consolette which is described and mentions a price of $329.50. Below this are pictures of three different console models, the 17-inch Fairfield Model 7T122 which was on sale for $299.95, the 17-inch Regency Model 7T123 which was on sale for $329.95 and the 19-inch Hillsdale Model 9T126 which was on sale for $359.95. The ad also mentions the RCA Victor "45" that could be bought for $12.95 and attached to any radio, phonograph or TV set to allow you to play 45 records. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 22, 1951
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 18

RCA
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Television Sets with Rotomatic Tuning. The headline claims that "New RCA Victor Television with Rotomatic Tuning brings you more to see - less to do" over a picture of a man sitting and enjoying the picture on his 17-inch Brent ($199.95) even while his wife is changing the channel. There is also pictures of the RCA Victor Preston 21-inch console ($399.50) shown in a comfortable living room and the 21-inch Talbot ($299.95) that is placed next to a window. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1953
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Television 39

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RCA Victor
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their television sets. Shown in the larger photo is the 21-inch Carrol which has the ability to swivel and a smaller photo of the Medalist 21. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 20, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 10

RCA
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their models available at this time. There are three pictures that show models available and gives information and prices for them. The top picture shows a young girl standing in front of a Towne Special 21" which it lists for $199.95. The next picture is of a teenaged girl standing in front of a Goldstone 21" set with a price of $269.95. The last picture shows a man and a woman in front of an Allison 21 Deluxe set which is listed at $329.95.
March 19, 1956
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Television 40

RCA Victor
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their Color Television that will show a very good Black and White picture too. There is a picture that has two views of musician Vaughn Monroe standing behind an Aldrich (21CS781) set in lined oak grained finish with one image holding a color picture and the other holding a black and white picture. The headline assures you that "Now you can enjoy "Living Color" plus sharp Black-and-White in ONE TV set for $495". The text talks about some of the features and discusses the size of the picture before talking about the number of television shows that were available in color just on NBC at that time. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View RCA / Vaughn Monroe

RCA
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Color TV's that are "custom-engineered the Space Age way - with dependable RCA solid copper circuits." Five different sets are shown; the 21" Rupert contemporary consolette, the Genoa 21" Moorish lowboy, the new 19" Color TV, the Cabot colonial consolette with casters, the Bermanager 19" Nordic consolette with casters and the 21" Karistad with clean-lined Scandinavian styling. The text talks about the fact that RCA has more experience than any other manufacturer of Color TV's so they are better able to anticipate problems and build-in ways to prevent them from happening.
April 15, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 79

RCA
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/4" ad for the fact that RCA Television Sets are available with the ColorTrak technology. The ad describes how this technology adjusts the color on the set for you and you don't have to get up and do it yourself. The ad has a picture of the Bordeaux model under the headline that asks the question "The ColorTrak System. Could it be the best 25" color TV ever made?".
March 14. 1977
Sports Illustrated
1
$7.50
View Television 13

Sharp
Full color 10" x 12" ad shows a tabletop TV with a football game on it. The ad headline claims that "This is not a simulated tv picture". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 31, 1969
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Television 7

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Sony
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their 7 inch TV. There is a picture of a young lady in a bathing suit at the beach leaning over with the sun behind her shoulder and watching a clear picture on, what the headline calls, "The Sun Set". The text talks about the Sunglass Screen that allows a picture to be seen both in the sun or the shade. This set is all-transistorized, a big deal back then, and could be used with a rechargeable battery or an AC wall plug. The only thing suspicious about this ad is that the young lady is watching a Western.
September 18, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 74

Sony
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their 700-U small television. There is a picture of this item with no picture on and the headline, comparing it with their 500-U, says "The Sony 700-U TV: A little more screen, a little less money". The text compares it with other sets of theirs by saying that the screen is 2 inches larger than the 500-U yet it costs $20.00 less and the 700-U weighs less than either the 500-U or the 900-U. It then admits that the 500-U is not as tall so if space is a major concern the 700-U might not do. It ends by listing the many things that all three sets share and lets you make the decision as to which one is right for you.
April 19, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 68

Sony
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that tries to explain the Difference between Sonyand the other brands of color TV's. The headline states "Sony's difference: Not just a brighter picture. A sharper focus." and the text tries to explain what that means to you, the viewer. It compares the set of three electron lenses that the other companies use with the single, big lens that Sony has developed that allows more light to go through giving a brighter picture. Bright is only half the battle though and the text claims that a single lens allows better focus for a clearer picture. This is what you get from a Sony Trinitron Color TV.
February 20, 1970
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 73

Sony
Full color 7 1/2" x 11" ad for Not Having to Worry about your Television Set. The headline asks "Does it pay to buy a Television Set this good?" and shows a Sony set sitting on top of another, non-working set. The text first presents you with another of situations that you may have encountered such as waiting for an important program and having your set fail or having your neighbor get a better picture. It then throws in a couple of fancy words like Trinitron and Aperture Grille, words for improvements that Sony has come up with and leaves it to you to decide if they are worth the extra money.
October 1974
Playboy
1
$7.50
View
Television 80

Sparton
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Cosmic Eye television. The ad has a drawing of a television set sitting at home plate of a filled baseball stadium. The ad headline says that this television is "Recommended by America's fine stores for it's Vivid Realism, for it's Quality". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 27, 1953
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Television 9

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Sparton
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for another one of their Cosmic Eye Televisions. This ad has a picture of a barn that has the doors slightly opened so we can see past the sign that says "Barn Dance" and view the 24" Sparton Crusader television that is showing a man in a western outfit playing a fiddle. Next to the television is a rocking chair with another fiddle but no person to play it. The ad headline calls this "TV so real you could almost join the dance!" which is what they want you to think actually happened. At the bottom of this ad are shown some of their Sky Beam Radios such as the Easy-Goer portable, the Tag-Along portable, the Morning Star clock-radio and the Duette which is an 8-tube AM-FM. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 12, 1953
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 14

Sylvania
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their HaloLight technology. Sylvania was so anxious for you to come and see this interesting idea that they were offering a 21-piece Buck Rogers Space Ranger Kit just for coming in, and bringing your child with you. The ad shows the 21 pieces of this giveaway and I had to count twice to hit 21. It contained a Super-Sonic Rocket Launcher, the Rocket that went on this launcher, Eight Flying Sauchers, a Flying Saucer Disintegrator, the Buck Rogers Space Helmet, an Official Buck Rogers Space Ranger Membership Card, a Chronoscopic Space Compass, Two Interplanetary Space Phones, a Space Ranger Badge, a Stratopower Space Ship, a Space Ranger Mask, a Martian Dynagator Target and eight Standing Figures, These figures include Buck and Wilma as well as Space Rangers and Martians. The ad has a picture of the Arlington 175M Table Model set with a description and mention of the 175B which came in Blonde.
October 13, 1952
Life magazine
2
$9.00
View Television / Toy

Sylvania
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for their 17" Slim Jim Portable. The picture shows it sitting on a table next a Life magazine so it's size can be compared and a woman's hands are reaching out calling attention to the small distance between the front and the back of the unit. The headline claims that "Sylvania's revolutionary 110 degre TV tube whittles the bulk from BIG SCREEN portables" and the claims is made that this unit has "The Slimmest Case", "The Biggest Screen" and The Clearest Picture". The text explains that this design is possible due to the new picture tube that Sylvania has come up with and mentions a price o $139.95. The ad also mentions a Thunderbird 7-transistor Portable Radio and a Swivel Base for the television for $4.88. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 18, 1957
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Television 46

Sylvania
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for their Sylvania TV with Halolight. They describe this as being "the frame of surround light that's kinder to your eyes" and offers it on a "wide range of important consoles and elegant table models, all with bit 21" and 24" screens". Shown in the ad is the Hollister (21T208) and the text talks about how your Sylvania dealer is now offering a package of Sylvania Softlight Bulbs just for coming in and trying out this unique television set.
April 15, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 52

Sylvania
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the New Shape of their Screen. The headline trumpets the fact that the "New Sylvania 23" screen changes the face of TV" and shows a sample of an ordinary 21" face showing the same image as the New 23" Squared Face next to it. The ad says that you will experience "No more 'porthole'scenes..." which means that "You see more of the picture the camera takes!". There are three models shown identified as one having the "trend-setting Sylouette styling", another being one of their Consoles and the third being a Lowboy.
October 19, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 58

Sylvania
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their True View 23" Television. There is a picture of their Model 23C28 Floor Console model with Jack Paar being seen on the picture tube. The ad headline claims that "Only Sylvania gives you the 3 Most Wanted Features in TV" and identifies these as being the 23" SIze, the Halolight that Sylvania was famous for and, of course, Remote Control. The text discusses these three features and gives some of the wood finishes that were avaialble when you bought the model shown.
February 22, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 70

Sylvania
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Color TV's. The ad has a picture of a stylish color TV console with a picture of a lady sitting in a chair and talking on a telephone. The ad text talks about how Sylvania is owned by General Telephone & Electronics and describes some of the work they are doing for future products. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 22, 1964
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 38

Westinghouse
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that asks "Are you sure you're getting the best color TV for the money?". It then asks some questions that will help you be sure of your answer. They ask "How will you know the picture is tuned perfectly?", or "Will sound and picture come on instantly, or do you wait for the warm-up". Then "Are you getting this year's chassis in this year's cabinet?" and "Will it give you studio-matched performance?". Then they ask "How about service?" and "Color TV for the family on a budget". There is a lot of good questions but the ad says "Compare: you'll buy Westinghouse".
March 5, 1968
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Television 82

Zenith
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for what everybody has been waiting for, a Round Picture Tube. The headline says "What you have been waiting for...Zenith Television with Giant Circle Screen" and shows a light colored unit that is displaying an image of a couple dancing. The text, trying to describe what is indescribable, says this concept is "so sensationally different it defies description" and says "We cannot give you a word picture of the important Zenith develpoments which are found in no other Television set. You must see it for yourself".
February 1949
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Television 60

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Giant-Picture Television. There is a picture of the St. Regis set with a couple dancing on the round screen and the ad mentions a few of its features and gives a price of $399.95. The ad calls attention to the "165 Sq. In. Giant Circle Picture", the "New Glare-ban 'Black' Tube" and the amazing "One-Knob Simplified Automatic Tuning". At the bottom of the ad is a picture of their Major Table Radio with a short description and a price mentioned of $39.95.
October 1949
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 66

Zenith
Full color 9" x 12" ad for the "Zenith Glare-Ban 'Black' Tube TV". This ad, introducing the "new standard of Television picture quality" also shows one model of television, one model of TV-Radio-Phonograph and two different desk radios. The ad includes information for all products and prices for the two radios.
December 1949
Better Homes & Gardens
0
$8.00
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Zenith
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their Black Magic TV and some of their other products. The ad has a picture of a lady in a green evening dress perched on a chair watching the picture on a Zenith TV Combination set called the Kilmer as two other formally dressed people stroll around the corner to see what is on. The ad headline calls it an "Enchanted Evening by Zenith. The setting: You...Your guests...1951 Black Magic TV with Reflection-Proof Screen". Shown in the bottom of the ad is a Table Radio called the Zephyr and a Standard Broadcast Portable called the Universal. The ad contains pretty good descriptions of all three units. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 6, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Television 16

Zenith
Full color 10" x 14" ad for the Black Magic Television with the Blaxide Tube. Shown in the ad is the Wordsworth TV-Radio-Phonograph and two different table model radios. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 27, 1950
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Television 5

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Zenith
Black and white 9" x 12" ad for their Turret Tuner which allowed the user to change the channels from the comfort of his own chair. The ad has a picture of a Zenith Aldrich Console TV ($369.95) being watched by a man who holds the remarkable tuner in his hand while he switches between the three channels available to him. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 1951
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Television 22

Zenith
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for what Zenith had to offer to the television viewer in 1954. The headline says that "One irreplaceable part holds the secret of better television" and the text goes on to explain that "The irreplaceable part is the Zenith crest". It goes on to state that this crest stands for quality "whether your Zenith costs $179.95 or $1250". There is a picture of the Zenith Nocturne Model L2267Y with a price tag of $499.95 and the ad discusses features such as Brilliant new Zenith Cinabeam picture tubes, Zenith's exclusive new Bandshell Speaker, offering Your chice of TV's 2 best ways of tuning, the Large lighted channel numbers and Zenith's "Lazy Bones" Remote Control.
November 1953
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Television 63

Zenith
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their sets with Top Tuning. The largest picture shows their revolutionary new Model X which is described and a price of $379.95 is mentioned. Below this set are pictures of the Melbourne Model R1812R 17" for $179.95 and the Sutton Model R2230R 21" for $219.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 17, 1954
Collier's
0
$8.00
View Television 24

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Zenith
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for their 23" Picture Window TV. There is a picture of the Zenith Palladium Model E3360 in new Danish Modern cabinetry with a couple dancing on the screen while a lady holds the Space Commander 400 remote up for all to see. The ad claims this set has a "New larger picture shape! World's most convenient remote TV tuning" and mentions several times that it has "282 square inches of rectgangular viewing area". It also talks about seeing the picture "even in the corners" and gives a price of $499.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Television 47

Zenith
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Color TV's. The ad has a picture of a large living room with a Lombardi Model 6051 as the focal point of the room. The headline claims that "If everyone knew what TV servicemen know, almost everyone would choose Zenith Color TV". The text talks about the handcrafted construction and the quality that results from it. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 8, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 41

Zenith
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Slim-Line Decorator TV's. The ad picture shows three different portable models: the Jamaica Model L2005F, The Sunnyside Model 2214L with Space Command Remote Control and the Caribbean Model L2014W. All of these portable TV's have a 19" picture and the prices start at $149.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 22, 1963
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 11

Zenith
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Handcrafted Color TV's. The ad has a drawing of a couple sitting and watching the very clear picture on their Zenith Television that is sitting in their living room. The ad headline assures you that "The pride you take in owning a Zenith Handcrafted Color TV is only equalled by the pride we take in Handcrafting it". The ad text talks about some of the other features including their Sunshine Color Tube and the Super Gold Video Guard Tuning System. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Television 31










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