Sunglasses Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.

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BRAND
AD DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
American Optical
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that discusses their Outdoor Eyewear. The headline leads us to believe that buying these kinds of glasses is "How to make things look great outdoors" and the text indicates that these are not necessarily stylish but practical. There are five pictures that highlight different features of their product. The first shows a Color Transmission Chart that "shows how the three types of AO outdoor lenses absorb the sun's ultraviolet rays". The second picture shows the eyes of a woman wearing their "remarkable haze-cutting Cosmetan lenses, styled to add zest to outdoor living". The third picture shows a lady lifting a beach ball and claims that the AO True-Color lenses she is wearing allows you to see "colors in their true relation to each other". Picture four shows a man nattily dressed with a sea Captains hat and wearing glasses with "a sturdy gold-filled frame with the sportsman look and Calobar green lenses to absorb discomforting sun rays". The last picture shows the famous AO Executive and Sovereign bifocal lenses. It also mentions that any of these three lenses could be ground to your individual prescription.
June 1959
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Sunglasses 10

Cool-Ray
Black and white 4 3/4" x 13" ad for their Clip-On Flip-Up Sunglasses. The ad has a series of four pictures that show the process. The first picture has you "Take your everyday glasses" and the next shows a set of Cool-Ray Polaroid fits-ons. The third picture shows the Cool-Rays on a pair of glasses that a man is wearing and they are screening out reflected glare. The fourth picture shows how they can be flipped up so that you can "Flip them up in shade, down in sun". The text talks about Polarlization telling how it works and says that two sizes will fit all types of eyeglasses. It says that each pair will cost $2.98 and they do have other Fit-Ons from $1.98.
May 1, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Sunglasses 3

Columbia
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their Flex-Fit Sun Glasses. There is a picture of a smiling lady who has a pair of these glasses on her face and she is pulling the arms away from her head in an effort to prove the headline that calls these "The world's only Sun Glasses that Flex to Fit your Face". A banner is saying that the "Hidden Spring Action is here" and at the bottom of the page is a display showing how you can "bend 'em" and "shape 'em". At the side are pictures showing different people wearing them in different activities and the caption calls them Practical!, Smart! and having Unusual Comfort! all for the price of $1.49 a pair which included a carrying case.
May 22, 1950
Life magazine
2
$8.00
View Sunglasses 2

Foster Grant
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad with actress Claudia Cardinale. The ad has six photos of her posing with different pairs of Foster Grant Sunglasses on with captions from different movies. The ad headline asks "Say isn't that Claudia Cardinale behind those Foster Grants". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1, 1965
Look magazine
0
$8.00
View Cardinale / Foster Grant

Temporarily
Sold Out

Foster Grant
Black and white 10" x 13" ad with actress Carroll Baker. The ad has a series of photos of the actress wearing different styles of their sunglasses amd each photo is captioned with one of the lines that she says in the movie Harlow. The text discusses the wider popularity of these facial accessories and mentions that they are "now equally at home beside a swimming pool at noon and a dance floor at midnight". It also says that "Foster Grant has combined Europe's hit styles with advanced American technology" and talks about their 1177 lens.
June 11, 1965
Life magazine &
June 29, 1965
Look magazine
3
$8.00
View Baker / Foster Grant

Foster Grants
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad with actor Peter Sellers. There are six photographs of Sellers in different style sunglasses with the usual headline, "Isn't that Peter Sellers behind those Foster Grants?" and under each picture is a caption of him quoting a line from one of his movies. The ad mentions his new movie What's New Pussycat and the text of the ad tries to figure out the new-found popularity of sunglasses.
May 28, 1965
Life magazine
&
June 15, 1965
Look magazine
1
$8.00
View Sellers / Foster Grant

Foster Grant
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with Anthony Quinn. The ad has six photos of Anthony wearing six different models of their sunglasses and each photo is captioned with a quote from one of his movies. The text explains how each different set of shades presents a differeent personna on the wearer. It mentions them being #1 in sunglasses and talks about their ff77 lenses.
January 21, 1966
Life magazine
2
$8.00
View Quinn / Foster Grant

Foster Grants
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with Mia Farrow. This ad contains six different photos of the starlet wearing six different styles of sunglasses. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 18, 1966
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Farrow / Foster Grant

Temporarily
Sold Out

Foster Grants
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their assortment of Sunglasses with European Film Star Vittorio Gassman. The ad contains six photos of him wearing or holding six different styles of their sunglasses with captions that are probably from movies of his that seem to fit the pose he is assuming. The headline asks the standard question, "Isn't that Vittorio Gassman behind those Foster Grants" and mentions his Embassy Pictures release Il Successo. The text talks about the international appeal od Sunglasses, mentions the many moods the actor found easy to assume wearing different Sunglasses and that the prices ranged from $1.00 to $5.00
May 3, 1966
Look magazine
0
$8.00
View Foster Grant / Vittorio Gassman

Temporarily
Sold Out

Foster Grant
Full color 10" x 13" ad with actress Elke Sommer. This ad contains six photos of the sexy actress wearing six different styles of their Sunglasses. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 27, 1966
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Sommer / Foster Grant

Foster Grant
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad with actress Julie Christie. There are six different pictures with her wearing different style glasses and a quote from different movies as a caption. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 27, 1967
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Christie / Foster Grant

Foster Grant
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their clip-on sunglasses with funnyman Woody Allen. The six pictures show him with several different styles dressed as several personalities and classic Woody Allen captions under the pictures. The ad mentions his new movie, Casino Royale, and the ad descripes the different styles of the sunglasses available in the Clip-On.
March 3, 1967
Life magazine
1
$9.00
View Woody Allen /
Foster Grant

Foster Grant
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with Terrance Stamp. The ad shows the handsome actor in six different scenes wearing different Foster Grants to fit the scene and the clothes. The ad headline asks "Isn't that Terence Stamp behind those Foster Grants?". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 10, 1968
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Stamp / Foster Grant

Foster Grant
Full color 10" x 13" ad for Foster Grant sunglasses. The ad contains six different pictures of Raquel Welch wearing different styles of sunglasses in a variety of revealing poses with a caption under each picture with her saying something that seems to fit the look of the photo. The text indicates how with their variety of styles you can look however you want and talks about their ff77 lenses. The text does mention her new movie Bandolero and asks the question that, after seeing this ad, who would you think of first if someone mentioned sunglasses beside Raquel Welch.
June 14, 1968
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Welch / Foster Grant

Grantly
Three color 5 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Sunglasses with actress Hedy Lamarr. The caption mentions her new movie, Dishonored Lady, and shows her placing her left hand to her jaw as she wears a pair of red Grantly's. The text claims these sunglasses are "Styled for the Stars" and offers "several styles and colors". You are encouraged to "choose several styles and colors" because "a sunglass wardrobe's the latest thing".
June 30, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Sunglasses / Hedy Lamarr

Polaroid
Black and white 5 1/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their Day-Driving Visor. This unique yet ill-fated device folded down into the driver's view of the road ahead and filtered the Harsh Glare away so the drive became comfortable. Knowing that bright sunlight from the side is never a problem makes me wonder why this item is not still available in some mail-order catalog. The ad has a picture of a happy man driving his car with the visor down and claiming "Tired eyes after a long drive? Not me!" and the text explains the theory behind this product and mentions a price of $5.95 for the De Luxe and $3.95 for the Standard, and, surprisingly, both prices were "just reduced".
May 12, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Sunglasses 5

Ray-Ban
Three color 5" x 13" ad for their Sunglasses. The ad has two pictures of a couple wearing these items while driving and playing golf and calls them "The finest Glare Protection money can buy". It urges you to wear them "from sunrise to sunset" and illustrates the Gradient Density which means the lenses are darker at the top.
May 22, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Sunglasses 8

Ray-Ban
Black and white 3" x 13" ad for their sunglasses with Real Glare Protection. This ad, from a fishing magazine, has a dissertation from a fictional character named Ray Ban. It has a drawing of a smiling man with a mustache wearing a hat and glasses while he grips a pipe between his teeth next to the headline "There is no difference between fish...or is there?" The ad talks about how different fish put up different kinds of a fight and, in the same way, there is no other brand of sunglasses that have the features that Ray-Ban's do. This ad mentions many of the features of these glasses and warns to "look for Ray-Ban on the nosepiece". This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
1952
Sports Afield
Fishing Annual
1
$8.00
View Sunglasses 1

Solarex
Three color 5 1/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their Scientific Sun Glasses with a picture of actor Cornel Wilde lifting his glasses up a bit to see better. The headline claims that "A man can Count On Solarex Scientific Sun Glasses" and the caption mentions his new movie The Homestretch. The text mentions that the style he is seen wearing is the SS-46 and claims that this brand is able to change "bright sunlight into Soft Restful Twilight". The promise that wearing these will filter at least 94% of the sun's Irritation Infra-red (heat) Rays and Ultra-violet (sunburn) Rays".
June 30, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Solarex / Cornel Wilde

Willsonite
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Sun Glasses. There is a drawing of a Willsonite Sun Glass Carnival display where a couple and their two children are enthusiastically checking them out and trying some on. The ad shows a floor-model display and two different countertop displays and the text claims that "More people in more places buy more Willsonite Sun Glasses than any other kind in the world".
June 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Sunglasses 9