Service Station Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.

These ads are alphabetically listed by Service Station name and then listed chronologically with the earliest ads first.


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BRAND
AD DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
Ashland
Three color 10" x 13" ad for their Friendly Service Stations. There is a drawing of an attendant neatly dressed in his uniform squatting down next to the A-Plus pump to give a bowl of water to a Dalmatian puppy that a young girl and her mother are traveling with. The headline says "When 'Feller' needs a friend...it's the Friendly Man with the Better Brand". The text refers mostly to the outstanding service the employees will give you but talks somewhat about the oil and gas products sold here.
June 5, 1962
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 36

Ashland
Three color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for the place to stop if you want any kind of help. The ad has a picture of a man with an Ashland uniform on standing in front of his station using a road map to show a man and his son how to get to where they really want to go. The ad headline claims that "He's happy to lend a guiding hand..." and refers to him as "The Friendly Man with the Better Brand". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 11, 1962
Look magazine
0
$7.50
View
Ashland 25

Temporarily
Sold Out

Citgo
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that announces that Cities Service has changed their name to Citgo. The ad has a picture of a Service Station with the name Cities Service fading and the sign saying Citgo becoming prominent. A group of attendants is swarming around a car that has pulled up to a pump and the mother and young girl are returning from a trip to the restroom with no ill effects or air borne illnesses. The ad headline says "ZZOOOMMM! Cities Service has changed into something more powerful.". Rather than having us think that it was a simple buyout they are claiming "Zzooooommm in a new gasolene. Zzooommm in a new oil. Zzoooommmm in a new spirit in service".
June 11, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 21

Citgo
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for some of the many things that were NEW at Citgo. At the top of the page is the word "Zzooommm!" which is identified as the "New sound of power". Below a drawing that shows some of the many helpful things that a Citgo attendant will do for your and your car are the phrases "Zzooommm in a new more powerful gasoline, Zzooommm in a new oil, Zzooommm in a new spirit in service". The text talks about the changes that include a more powerful gasolene (their spelling, not mine), a new oil, a whole new way of doing things and a new name.
July 2, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 41

Citgo
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that reminds us of when you got your gasoline from a Service Station instead of a Self-Serve Gas Station, when a man would come out to your car, fill your tank and make sure everything was OK on your car. There is a pretty mother smiling as she carries a bag of groceries toward the house as her kids get whatever else is in the trunk. The headline has her thinking "There's a new man in my life" and the text discusses the many things that a Car Man, especially from Citgo, can do for your. The ad assures you that "There's a Car Man for every woman at Citgo".
April 30, 1971
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 62

Citgo
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad with a picture of a smiling lady primping as she tries on a new hat. The headline tells us that "There's a new man in my life" and he may not be able to sweep her off her feet but he will clean her windshield and check her oil. The ad refers to him as The Car Man and talks about the many things he will do to make sure that every customer of Citgo is properly serviced, "no matter how far it is from home". We are reassured that "There's a Car Man for every woman at Citgo".
May 7, 1971
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 60

Cities Service
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that is trying to emphasize everything Big. The ad has a picture of a scene from the west with a mountain casting it's reflection into a still lake and the image of a gas pump in the front with the words "Quality alone makes it Big!" standing next to it. The ad headline says "Big Gallon - Big Service, Too!" and the text explains the reasoning for these two claims. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 28

Cities Service
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for the station that delivered the Big Gallon. The ad has a picture of a carload of kids in an old car that is being checked over by a service station attendant at a Cities Service Station. The ad headline claims "Big Gallon Big Service Cities Service". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 28, 1964
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 20

DX
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that urges you to get a DX Credit Card. There is a man and his dog traveling around the country in a credit card with wheels as the ad tells us that this card is good "in all 50 states (and Canada, too)..". They call it the "best way to travel since the invention of the wheel!" and the text talks about other benefits you will receive as a holder of a credit card from the Sunray DX Oil Company
April 16, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 61

DX
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the stations with the DX sign from the Sunray DX Oil Company. There is a picture of an attendant working on cleaning the rear window in a car (remember, they were called service stations then) as the four young occupants of the back seat laugh at his playful attitude. The headline calls these four children "Four of the very best reasons for choosing DX Safety Lane Service (you may have more)". The text talks about the Safety Lane Service and the DX Safety Lane Check List and gives a general idea of what you could depend on being checked so that you could drive away safely. The ad also refers to Sunray as "America's most customer-minded oil company".
May 14, 1965 &
November 3, 1965
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View
Service Station 44

DX
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the stations run by the Sunray DX Oil Company. The ad has a picture lined as if a jigsaw puzzle that shows a picturesque scene of flowers on gentle hills with slightly higher hills in the distance. The headline assures you that "DX makes travel a pleasure - not a puzzle" and the text talks about the DX Travel Service. It discusses some of the services that will be at your fingertips and refers to itself as "America's most customer-minded oil company".
June 11, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 47

Enco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Power-Formula Gasoline. The ad has a headline that says "Put a Tiger in Your Tank" over a picture of a man who has pulled his car into an Enco Service Station and is watching the attendant trying to put a large tiger into his gas tank. The attendant simplifies the task by saying "First we start with the tail". The ad claims that this "New Power-Formula Enco Extra Gasoline boosts power three ways:" then gives more complete information by talking about Cleaning Power, Firing Power and Octane Power. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 12, 1964
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View
Service Station 24

Temporarily
Sold Out

Enco
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad has a drawing of the Tiger sitting on top of a car, driven by two old ladies, that is leaving an Enco Service Station. The one lady notices the tail of the tiger coming through the window at her and the other lady reassures her, "No Emma, it's in the gasoline". The ad headline is their familiar refrain "Put a Tiger in Your tank". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 17, 1964
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View
Service Station 17

Temporarily
Sold Out

Enco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a cartoon drawing of the tiger pushing a car that is out of view to the right. The ad has a caption of the wife telling her husband "But George..I'm sure I heard a roar." and the headline asks you to "Put a Tiger in your Tank!" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 24, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 12

Enco
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their Tiger-In-The-Tank Sweepstakes. This ad, placed near the end of the contest says that your chance to win is "Going...Going...Almost Gone!" and has a drawing of their trademark Tiger holding up one of the 50 red and black Rambler Sports Fastback Marlin that were a First Prize in this contest. It says the last drawing was July 14 and mentioned the other prices which included Lone Star Mystic Boats, RCA Victor Color TV Home Entertainment Centers, Genie Automatic Garage Door Openers, Olivetti Underwood Portable Typewriters, Tyco Racing Sets and RCA Victor Transistor Radios. It assures the public that half the prizes were still to be awarded.
July 2, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 40

Enco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of the Tiger trying to fit into the Rumble Seat of an old green car being driven by an old man. The ad headline has the familiar "Put a Tiger in Your Tank" because it "Makes even '23s skiddoo!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 23, 1965
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View
Service Station 15

Temporarily
Sold Out

Enco
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their High-energy Enco Extra gasoline refined by Humble. The ad has a picture of a couple in a convertible with the Enco Tiger on the back of the car. The man who is driving the car is leaning over toward the woman with romantic intentions as she leans away and warns him "Freddy...one tiger in this car is enough". The text specifies the three advantages that this gas will give you and offers you Happy Motoring.
November 3, 1965
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View
Service Station 59

Temporarily
Sold Out

Enco
Full color 10" x 13" ad for Enco Service Stations and for Humble Oil. The ad contains a large drawing of spacemen walking in space doing repairs on a shuttle type vehicle and a smaller drawing of a tiger pushing a car out of an Enco station. The ad headline proclaims "For earth travel, a Tiger in your tank...for future space travel, radiation protection". The ad text talks about Humble working on an anti-radiation pill. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 7, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 4

Esso
Full color 10" x 14" ad for another of the Service Stations under the Humble Oil & Refining Company name. This ad is an exact copy of one for Enco but was taken from a magazine that went to a different part of the country. This ad shows the Tiger pushing the back end of a car and the headline tells you to "Put a Tiger in Your Tank" while a voice from within the car says "But George...I'm sure I heard a Roar". Another headline makes the claim that "New Power-formula Esso Extra Gasoline boosts Power Three Ways" and mentions 1) Cleaning Power, 2) Firing Power and 3) Octane Power. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 24, 1964
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View
Service Station 35

Esso
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for Esso Service Stations. Depending on the state you were in you might see either an Esso station or an Enco or even a Humble and this issue of Life obviously came from a different part of the country than some of the others I have been getting. This ad is the same as another on this page with the exception of the Esso logo in the lower right corner. It shows the tiger sitting in the passenger seat of an old green jalopy tipping his hat to the readers with the headline "Put a tiger in your tank! Makes even '23's Skiddoo!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 23, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 33

Ethyl
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their Hi-Octane Gasoline. There is a large drawing of a 1924 Chrysler that has pulled up in front of a Country Club so the gentleman driver can help the ladies from the car. The caption mentions that this is one of the earlier automobiles that really needed a higher octane gasoline than what was being offered. There are other smaller drawings of later automobiles that could and did benefit from Ethyl hi-octane gasoline. These include the 1929 Ruxton, the 1931 Marmon, the 1937 Bantam and the current 1952 Chrysler that is pulling up to a set of pumps and the attendant has already pulled the nozzle from the Ethyl gas pump. The text mentions that in the previous sixty years there have been two thousand makes of cars built in the U.S. but the number has fallen to only twenty. The claim is made that the few that have survived were able to supply the public with things that they wanted which included performance which made it necessary for a higher octane gas, like Ethyl.
June 30, 1952
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Service Station 38

Flying A
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Ethyl Gasoline at their service stations and for the Veedol 10-30 Motor Oil. The ad has a picture of a serious-minded young boy who is performing his duties as a member of the Safety Patrol on a rainy morning. He is standing on the edge of the painted line for the crosswalk and is holding up his "STOP" sign toward a green GM car so that a group of children can safely cross. The ad headline says that "Under the wings of the Flying A Safety is out business" just like this young man. The text explains that having "the smoth, quiet power of Flying A Ethyl gasoline" is one of the easiest ways to be able to drive safely and if you are going to stop there for gas, you might as well use their oil since it is designed to compliment their gasoline. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 15, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Veedol / Flying A

Veedol
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the 10-30 Motor Oil from the Tidewater Oil Company sold at the Flying A stations. There is a picture of a devoted family doctor driving his car to the house of a needy patient in the darkness of the late night hours. The headline claims this doctor is traveling "Under the wings of the Flying A" and claims the products sold there are "Just what the Doctor ordered". The text makes a claim that I sure would have been hard to prove when it talks of doctors and claims that "so many stop at the Flying A". It makes the more general claims about better power in the city and on the open road along with extra protection. Another claim that would have been hard to prove is, when talking about Veedol 10-30 Motor Oil, calls it "the all season Motor Oil that gives highest octane performance". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view. November 12, 1956
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View
Veedol / Flying A

Temporarily
Sold Out

Gulf
Full color 7 3/4" x 10 1/2" ad that is for "The Great New Gulfpride" oil. The ad shows a swimming pool in Miami Beach, Florida and tells the reader to "change to the great new Gulfpride" before you drive down there.
February 16, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View
Service Station 1

Gulf
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that warns you that Carbon in you gasoline will hurt your car which is why you should go to Gulf Oil Company. There is a very large picture in this ad that shows a male right hand holding maybe twenty-five little pieces of carbon on it's forefinger and the heading says that "Even this much extra carbon can waste 1 gallon in 10". The text of the ad claims that "Carbon costs you money. A tiny bit extra on a vital engine part can waste a tenth of the gasoline you buy, cost you 50 cents or more every time you fill up. Why is this so? Carbon hurts your engine. It increases roughness. Fouls spark plugs. Runs up repair bills". The answer to this is that "Gulf gasolines control carbon. Gulf's super refining process refines out dirty-burning, deposit-forming elements. Result: cleaner-burning performance, faster pick-up, fewer repairs. Just try Gulf. You'll like the driving. You'll like the saving, too".
November 3, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 65

Gulf
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the three grades of gasoline they had at that time. This ad is a larger version of another ad on this page and shows the three gas pumps standing next to each other. Under each pump, the Gulftane, the Good Gulf and the Gulf No-nox are the words "Best". You wonder how that can be and the text explains that they are each designed for specific types of engines and each are the best for what they are designed. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 10-17, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
0
$7.50
View
Service Station 32

Temporarily
Sold Out

Gulf
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that discusses how Gulf can make your trips better with their Tourguide Service and their Credit Card. The ad has a picture of a Blue car that has two front ends pointing in opposite directions. The same couple is in the driver's seat looking left and looking right with matching luggage strapped eo the roof. The headline urges you to "Take off in all directions. (But take along Gulf's Tourguide kit...and your Gulf Credit Card)". The text gives information about how these two simple and easy-to-get items will make your trips less of a headache.
September 7, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 51

Gulf
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for the Three grades of gasoline that Gulf offers which, according to Gulf, just happen to be the best of each grade. The ad has a picture of the three pumps that dispense these types of fuel and each one has the word "Best" under it. The ad text describes what makes Gulftane, Good Gulf and Gulf No-nox so good.
December 6, 1963
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View
Gulf 30

Humble
Full color 10" x 13" ad for a contest being run by the Humble and Enco companies. There is a picture of their trademark Tiger standing behind a Ford Mustang tossing paper money into the air while the headline encourages you to "Win with free Tiger-Money". Shown at the bottom of the ad are the prizes which start with 15 Ford Mustangs and go down to 12,000 AMX Roadmaster Bicycles.
June 24, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 63

Marathon
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that is meant to indicate that you will get better mileage when you fill your car up with Marathon but, in this day and age, they might rethink the image. The picture, taking up the majority of the page, shows a single man on a camel slowly making their way across a vast desert. The only tracks on the desert seem to be theirs and they are just reaching the top of a sand dune and the headline claims that "Marathon goes farther to make friends". The image is meant to convey the importance of "getting your money's worth" because the only other written message in the ad is that "Marathon Super-M Gasoline takes you even farther on a fill".
June 11, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 58

Mobil
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a drawing by Ronald McLeod that shows a horse in a harness looking back and thinking "Wish I had his pull!". This ad discusses the eight reasons that Mobilgas gives "Balanced Performance". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned image.
May 13, 1940
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View
Service Station 8

Temporarily
Sold Out

Mobil
Full color 10" x 14" wartime ad with a photo of a smiling gas station attendant pumping gas into the tank of a car as two men in suits watch and talk. The ad headline lets you know that "You'll Ride on Flying Horsepower After Victory". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Service Station 9

Mobil
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their High Quaality Economy Gasoline. We see a picture that shows a Blue Cadillac driving on a hilly two-lane roadway through the mountains of the West, past two curious Brown Bears, as the headline promises "All the Gas Mileage your Car Can Deliver!". This claim has supposedly been "Proved in the 4th Annual Mobilgas Economy Run" and this gas is available "At Low Regular Price!". The text mentions a 22.3 miles-per-gallon average chalked up in this most recent test and it is revealed that "unless your car demands Special grade gasoline, regular Mobilgas is your best buy". Along the right side of the ad is the familiar claim that every mother hoped for on every trip, Clean Rest Rooms.
July 27, 1953
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Service Station 52

Mobil
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their Mobilgas Special gasoline. There is a picture showing an attendant standing next to pump with a smile on his face. The headline claims that it "Boosts Engine Power up to 25%" and claims that it is the only gasoline that is Double Powered. They explain that this means that it has Mobil Power Compound and Top Octane. The text identifies what these will do for your car then mentions that Glymonate and RT 200 are also mixed into what goes into your tank.
June 21, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Service Station 39

Mobil
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the New Mobilgas Special, so good because there is "No Other Gasoline Like It". The ad shows a seemingly giant-sized Mobilgas Special gas pump and we are told that it is "TheOnly Gasoline Double Powered with 1) Mobil Power Compound - most powerful combination of chemical additives ever put into any gasoline to correct engine troubles and 2) Top Octane - for greatest knock-free power - result of the world's most advanced refining developments". We are then told that it "Boosts Engine Power Up to 25% over Results with Conventional Premium Gasolines". The Mobil Power Compound works by "Boosts power up to 25%", "Checks pre-ignition ping", "Corrects spark plug misfiring", "Controls stalling" and "Combats gum". We are told that "There's a Tune-up in Every Tankful".
July 5, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Service Station 68

Mobil
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the gasoline available from the Mobil Service Stations. The ad has a drawing of a large, red gas pump sitting in front of a scene showing long lines of cars driving flawlessly on roads in the Southwest. The ad headline claims this brand is the "Only Gas of it's Kind - Boosts Engine Power up to 25%" and the headline at the end of the ad claims that "There's a Tune-Up in Every Tankful". It is also claimed that this is "The only Gasoline Double Powered with 1) Mobil Power Compound" and "2) Top Octane". The things that these will prevent are "Checks Pre-Ignition Ping", "Corrects Spark Plug Misfiring", "Controls Stalling" and "Combats Gum".
September 20, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Mobil 14

Phillips 66
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad where the headline assures you of getting "First-Class Service". In the foreground of the picture is a smiling man holding up his Phillips 66 Credit Card while in the background are ready-to-serve station attendants and employees of the Quality Courts Motels. The service station attendants are surrounded by products such as oil, batteries, gas pumps and other chemicals while the Quality Courts employees include the housekeeping staff and a man carrying a tray of food. The caption says "Example: With a Phillips 66 credit card you can drive-now-pay-later, and say 'charge it' at over 500 Quality Courts Motels!". The text mentions making major purchases and being allowed to "take up to six months to pay" and that their service and products have "made Phillips famous in 47 states".
June 11, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 48

Phillips 66
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad shows a man sitting in his car as it is being given "First_Class Service" by a Phillips 66 attendant. The ad text describes the Phillips 66 Mystery Motorist who goes from station to station giving out $50 certificates to stations that provide him with the service that he expects. The text gives more details about this early program to get an idea what kind of service was being proficed at their company stations.
September 10, 1965
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View
Service Station 2

Phillips 66
Full color 10" x 13" ad shows a cowboy riding a motor scooter through the desert with a Pony Express mail bag hanging from his seat. The ad headline says "Go with Phillips 66...the gasoline that won the West" even though the motor scooters were available 100 years after the Pony Express was. The text talks about the features that the dealerships have for the customers such as a vacuum cleaner to clean your car up.
May 13, 1966
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View
Service Station 3

Phillips 66
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Hi-energy, hi-mileage gasoline that was available in 47 states. The ad has a drawing of a cowboy tacking up a poster using the butt of his six-gun to drive the nails. The poster says "Reward Phillips 66" and the ad headline asks you to "Go with Phillips 66...the gasoline that won the West!". The ad talks about the hospitality shown by their station attendants and how many stations are equipped to vacuum out your car free, if you ask. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 26, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 26

Phillips 66
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Gasoline now available in 49 states. There is a colorful picture of a cowboy with a flowing handlebar moustache driving through the desert in his convertible. Sitting in the back seat with a look of joy on his face is his horse and he has raised his one hoof, probably trying to get him to go faster. The headline urges you to "Go with Phillips 66..the gasoline that won the West!" and the text talks about you getting "more gallop-per-gallon" and mentions that "our stations are equipped to vacuum your car free".
September 16, 1966
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View
Service Station 31

Phillips 66
Three color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their promotion to do with the 1970 Baseball All-Star Game. The ad has a photo of a young boy wearing a baseball glove, hat and jacket looking out his bedroom window at the pouring rain. The ad headline is telling him "Cheer up! You could end up playing at the All-Star Game this year" and talks about their contest to send eight boys and their parents to the game for the First Annual Major League Baseball Pitch, Hit & Throw Competition. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 1970
Boy's Life
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 18

Pure
Black and white 7 1/4" x 10 1/2" ad for their Super Gasoline which they felt was the "Closest Thing to Racing Gasoline". The ad has a picture of a car staged at the lights at a drag strip and the headline lets you know that this ad will tell you "How to spot your winner before he hits the quarter". The first few paragraphs are very instructive and full of tips but it begins to get simple when it gets to the Gas classes. Here it indicates that the main giveaway is to pay attention to who is running with the "red Firebird emblem on the car". It explains that "Pure Firebird Racing Gasolines have set more racing records than any other brand" and encourages you to fill up "at the big, blue Pure Oil sign" on your way home from the strip.
July 1967
Hot Rod
1
$7.50
View
Pure 46

Pure
Blue and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Pride 5-Star tire from the Union 76 company. The headline announces that "Pure unwraps the soundest tire investment ever offered" and shows a tire with the protective paper being unwound from it. The text talks about the benefits of this product and about the construction which makes it special.
April 19, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Service Station 43

Shell
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" wartime ad has a drawing of one of the Anti-Submarine Tactics developed by Navy pilots. The drawing, which is labeled as the Fifth in a series of advertisements, shows three planes working together to clear the sub decks of anti-aircraft gunners and drop depth charges when the coast is clear. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Wartime / Shell

Shell
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the additional products that come from the refining of petroleum and what companies like Shell are doing to provide them to the general public. The ad has a drawing of a table in a house where a lamp is flanked by a lit cigarette and a book of Shakespeare opened to an illustrated page. The headline says "From Cigarettes to Shakespeare..." and the text goes into details about how glycerin, which comes from the refining of petroleum, is used in printing and is added to cigarettes to provide "sufficient moisture so the cigarette burns slowly, coolly, pleasantly...". It talks about more of the uses of Glycerin and that Shell has started construction on a new refinery that will capture more of this product so that we will have enough at an affordable price.
May 12, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Shell 49

Shell
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for the Shell Oil Company that says that "In its first year TCP...the Greatest Gasoline Development in 31 years...has repowered 8 million engines". The reason for this amazing fact is that "TCP, the Shell-discovered additive, blended into Shell Premium Gasoline, controls pre-ignition and spark plug fouling caused by lead and carbon deposits. Increases power up to 15%...spark plug life up to 150%". This is an informative ad having no pictures other than a small Shell insignia at the bottom right. The ad says that "An entirely new gasoline, Shell Premium Gasoline with TCP, was first introduced to American motorists 12 months ago. Because it overcomes the greatest cause of power and fuel loss affecting today's engines, it was hailed as the greatest fuel development sinde the introduction of tetraethyl lead in gasoline back in 1922. In the first year following its announcement, Shell Premium with TCP has met with outstanding success. It has repowered more than 8 million engines".
July 5, 1954
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 67

Sinclair
Full color 10" x 13" ad with a Flash Gordon type space ship flying around a planet while the ad headline introduces their "New 3-stage gasoline. Over 100-octane. No increase in Price". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 23, 1959
Life magazine
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Service Station 6

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Sinclair
Full color 8" x 11 1/4" ad with an outdoor theme. There is a photo of fathers and sons camping on a lakeshore. The ad headline, which is next to a drawing of a Sinclair service station, says "First Stop for the Great Outdoors".
May 1963
Sports Afield
1
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Service Station 5

Sinclair
Full color 7 1/2" x 11" ad that discusses some of the Conservation ideas that Sinclair is trying to make known. This ad has several pictures of the Okefenokee area and, under the headline "A little town put up a big fight, and now this natural beauty is yours to enjoy", has the story of the residents and the efforts they used to keep their area natural.
April 29, 1968
Sports Illustrated
1
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Service Station 27

Skelly
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad that calls attention to Keotane which they have developed and added to every gallon of gasoline sold at their stations. The ad has a picture of two pistons, one with the combustion surface worn but clean and the other with the combustion surface covered with carbon which has flaked off in areas and left an irregular surface. The captions explain that "As you drive all gasolines add mileage stealing carbon to your engine" and "Only Skelly has Keotane that 'unglues' carbon". The ad makes the promixe that "a Keotane-Clean engine can give you one mile extra for every 8 you drive". The text, full of facts, indicate that Skelly has been granted a patent for Keotane, that road tests prove that using it will give you an average of 12.7 % more mileage and estimates are that it will "add up to 6.1 cents extra value per gallon".
May 3, 1963
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 57

Sunoco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the gas station that gave you a choice from eight different kinds of gasoline. The ad has a small picture of the front of one of these gas pumps and a larger picture of a pump from the side where the Blend Selector dial was visible with the choices of from 190 to 260 octane gasoline in plain sight. The ad headline assures you that you will get "Exact power...on the button!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 24-31, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
1
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Service Station 29

Sunoco
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for their 260 Gasoline which they called "The Highest Octane Pump Grade Gasoline you can Buy!". Scattered among the words "It's A Gas!" are pictures of a variety of sports cars in action at the track and in preparation.
July 1967
Hot Rod
1
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Sunoco 45

Sunoco
Full color 8" x 10 3/4" ad produced solely for the purpose of letting anyone interested in racing their car on the street or strip know that the Sunoco 260 gasoline was "The Highest Octane Pump Grade Gasoline You Can Buy". On what looks like a close-up drawing of a racing car is the large red headline stating that "It's A Gas".
July &
October 1968
Hot Rod
2
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Service Station 56

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a large drawing of a very cute little baby and he is saying (thinking) "I'm watching for that sign". Under these words is a metal sign that says "Registered Rest Room". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
September 22, 1941
Life magazine
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Service Station / Babies

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Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that encourages you to keep your car serviced. The ad has two drawings, one of a red convertible being driven by a family that doesn't seem to notice the smoke pouring out of the exhaust. This picture has the headline "Smoke Means Trouble and wasted gas! CareLess Today." The picture of this family walking along while they carry their things is covered by the headline "Car-Less Tomorrow". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1942
Life magazine
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Service Station 16

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Texaco
Full color 10" x 13" wartime ad that reminds us what the real reason for fighting this war was. The drawing shows a young man trying to carry a rifle, knife, uniform, helmet, boots and every thing else that is issued to a soldier when he joins the Army. The ad headline has him explaining that "I'm fighting for my right to boo the Dodgers" and the text mentions, among other things, some of the products that The Texas Company is producing to contribute to the war effort. It talks about how everyone is working to win this war, whether as soldiers or producing necessary products at home.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
2
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Wartime / Texaco

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" wartime ad that pays tribute to the many soldiers that were fighting to retain our freedom and to the many ways that the people at home can help too, Pictured in the ad are 23 different ribbons as examples of some of what were being awarded to soldiers in our service. The headline reminds us that they are "YOUR battles, too!" and said that "Perhaps you helped win them". It mentions donating blood, not using rubber so that more is available to the soldiers and using less gasoline in order to help "our armies drive on to Berlin". It also, as usual, mentions buying War Stamps and that The Texas Company is producing "millions of gallons of 100-octane gasoline...toulene for explosives...high quality lubricating oils for our fighting forces". Lest the 100-octane statement confuse you, that was what was available for the military and their high performance engines, the people on the home front were mostly using a combination of gasoline and benzene.
August 30, 1943
Life magazine
1
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Wartime / Texaco 55

Texaco
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about one of the many Wartime Contributions that The Texas Company is making to win the war. The ad has a colorful drawing of a large drop of oil with a tire inside of it. The ad headline proclaims "Miracle...in Texas" and talks about how they are producing Synthetic Rubber to help make our victory possible. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 31, 1944
Life magazine
1
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Wartime / Texaco

Texaco
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that describes how the cars during World War II were not as reliable as the cars of today. The drawing shows a man in a Texaco uniform and cap working on a gold car while the portly owner of this car is still there patting his car down. The headline says that "Life begins at 40,000...for cars that get the right care". The ad says that "Many of us used to consider that at 40,000 a car was past it's prime. Actually, 40,000 miles in the life of a well-cared-for-car can be just the beginning of an even longer period of service". They claim that any Texaco dealer can tell you, proper lubrication is the most important care that can be taken of a car. They claim that cars that receive proper lubrication have been known to last to 80,000 miles. I am shocked. They recommend that you put Texaco lubricants into your car. As one of the later saying says, "Havoline's 40 years of "car-care" make it the motor oil for your car today".
June 19, 1944
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 64

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" wartime ad for the reliability of your local Texaco Dealer. The ad has a picture of a shipyard parking lot with one car removed from the picture with some comments about how many cars will be knocked out of service this year. The ad headline asks "Out of the Picture! Is your car next?" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 30, 1945
Life magazine
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Texaco 19

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Texaco
Three color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the benefits of using their Fire Chief Gasoline. There is a drawing of a smiling man sleeping with a vision of a Fireaman's hat vivid in his dreams. The headline assures us that "Dreams of Power!...come true with Fire-Chief" and goes into details about the Starting Power, the more Responsive Power, the Smooth Power and the Superior Fire-Power that you and every other user of Texaco's Fire-Chief gasoline will realize, The ad also tells us that now there are Texaco dealers "in all 48 states".
May 12, 1947
Life magazine
1
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Texaco 50

Texaco
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that wants you to "Put spring in your car...with a Texaco Check-Up". The ad shows a two-door roaring out of a flower while the four people seem unconcerned about where they have just been. The ad warns us that there is "Warmer weather coming! And the open road beckons! For comfort and safety get your car in tip-top shape now. Be an early bird...see your Texaco Dealer for a complete spring check-up. You'll get" and they mention 1) Livelier power, 2) Cushioned riding and 3) Smooth shifting. All items that were in need of repair after six months of driving back then.
April 14, 1947
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 69

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Havoline Motor Oil with a picture of baseball superstar Ted Williams swinging a bat. The ad headline says "Custom-Made to give you Best performance Best Protection". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 14, 1950
Life magazine
1
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Texaco / Williams 1

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that urges you to "Getaway wen you need it!". The ad has a drawing of a summer day and a bee hive has dropped to the ground causing many bees to respond to whatever they think caused their house to fall. Unfortunately there are five Dalmatian puppies who were there when it landed and now they are running as fast as their little legs will let them. The ad says that "You'll like Fire-Chief's livelier-than-ever power...instant starts...fast getaways. You'll like it's regular price too. So fill up with Fire-Chief gasoline at your Texaco Dealer...the best friend your car ever had". The ad tells us that there is Texaco dealers in all 48 states which should tell us something about the time this ad was drawn.
May 28, 1951
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 66

Texaco
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for Texaco that says that "When you have to start COLD...Sky Chief packs punch!". The ad picture shows a large boxing glove punching out and bending a thermometer that is reading "0". The text says "Volatane Control makes cold going easy going. And that's because, in famous Sky Chief gasoline, volatility and octane are scientifically balanced (Volatane Control). Sky Chief gives you quick starts, faster warm-ups, smoother pick-up and easier hill climbing. In fact, it feels like the power of an extra motor. So fill up today with Sky Chief at your Texaco Dealer...the best friend your car ever had". This ad was during the time that Texaco advertised using the words Sky Chief.
January 28, 1952
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 70

Texaco
Three color 5 1/2" x 8 3/4" ad that talks about some of the "Service" that is performed at their "Station". In an attempt to convince you that their Marfak Lubriction "protects car chassis better, longer" they tell you about the Rub Test. The ad has a picture of a man in a Texaco uniform standing in front of his station rubbing a wheel bearing that he holds in his hand. The bearing has been greased (lubricated, excuse me) and the text explains how the Marfak forms a "fluid film" when rubbed with a finger, "yet it keeps a tough, protective 'collar'". This lubrication is claimed to provide protection for 1,000 miles and calls your Texaco Dealer, "the best friend you car ever had".
September 1952
Popular Mechanics
1
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Service Station 55

Texaco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of five Dalmatian puppies playing in the yard chasing butterflies. The ad headline calls them, and Texaco gasoline, "Plenty lively!" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 27, 1953
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 11

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that brings our attention to the fact that Texaco Fire-Chief and Texaco Sky Chief are the only two gasolines that "are 100% Climate-Controlled for your area and for each one of the 25 weather areas in the U.S.A.!". The text explains about the blending and different refining processes used to compensate for the climate, altitude and season for the 25 areas that the engineers from Texaco divided the country into.
July 27, 1953
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 53

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad with a large drawing of a colorful frog in mid-jump. The ad headline warns you to "Get the jump on Spring!" and gives you tips on what your Texaco Dealer can do for you. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 12, 1954
Life magazine
0
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Service Station 10

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Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Sky Chief Gasoline. The ad has a picture of a man who has just had his car filled up with gasoline at a Texaco Service Station. Through the open driver side window he tells the snow-covered attendant who is still holding the gas nozzle, "You're right! You can't beat this Texaco Sky Chief with Petrox!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 7, 1955
Life magazine
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Texaco 23

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Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of a group of Dalmatian puppies running and jumping onto, slipping and falling on a frozen pond. The ad headline claims these, and the Texaco gasoline, will give you "Lively winter performance!" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 21, 1955
Life magazine
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Service Station 13

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Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that tells you what you get when your car has a fillup at a Texaco gas station. The ad has a picture that shows what the driver sees when he is pulling into a Texaco Service Station. Through the windshield you can see a smiling attendant in a green uniform already standing there with the proper gas nozzle in his hand ready to dispense a "Great new source of Power for your car!". The ad talks about the three advantages you get with this gas which includes the addition of Petrox.
August 20, 1956
Life magazine
1
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Texaco 22

Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the Power your car will get when you fill-up with Sky Chief. There is an overhead shot of a Black Convertible with two well-dressed occupants that has pulled up to a Texaco station. The male driver is turning in his seat and is talking to the attendant who is busy filling the man's car and the headline calls it a "Great New Source of Power for your car!". The text tells us that "Texaco Sky Chief supercharged with Petrox" and claims by using this you will "get all the knock-free power your engine, new or old, can deliver", you will "get a bonus of up to 1,000 extra gasoline miles a year" and that you will "get the finest premium gasoline built for all high compression engines". It also claims to give you 1-2-3 Power which gives you Petrox, Top Octane and it is 100% Climate-Controlled.
October 1, 1956
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 37

Texaco
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that reminds you to "Trust your car to the man who wears the star". There is a picture of a muddy dirt road that a Chevrolet is slogging through. The text explains this is a "Detour! Brutal punishment for your car (and for the lubricant that protects it)!". It goes on to talk about the Texaco lubricant Marfak and promises that it will last in conditions such as this and protect your car.
April 5, 1963
Life magazine
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Service Station 42

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Texaco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad with another reason to "Trust your car to the man who wears the star". The ad shows a long, stretch of straight two-lane highway and indicates someone passing a semi. The headline starts with the warning "The passing lane...where 10 seconds seems such a long time" and explains that by using Sky Chief gasoline, which is made using high-energy fuel components, "first used by aircraft engines", your car will deliver more and you will likely be safer.
April 26, 1963
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 54

Texaco
Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that features a photo of Bob Hope holding a glass that has a blue sponge in it and a straw coming out the top. The ad headline asks the question "How tough is it to get oil out of the ground? Try sipping soda through a sponge!"
February 22, 1982
Sports Illustrated
2
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Bob Hope / Texaco

Union Oil of California
Black and white 10" x 13" ad with Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch. Elroy talks about how he has a new jog: "Sports Director of the Union Oil Company of California". The ad contains a 6" x 6 1/2" photo of him discussing baseball with a young boy. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 12, 1958
Life magazine
1
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Hirsch / Union Oil

Union Oil Company
of California

Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that tries to put a face to the Service Station Attendants. The headline says "Morley Barnard. Dervice separates the boys from the Minute Men" over a picture of this smiling man already holding the gas nozzle in his hand ready to fill your tank. The text tells how a new customer pulled into his station in Cedar Hills, Oregon and "In 4 1/2 minutes we filled his tank with gasoline, checked his oil and tires, added clean water to his radiator and battery, washed his windows, brushed out his car, emptied his ashtrays and gave him his receipt". The text goes on to explain how all of their employees are trained to provide service to this degree so why not stop there. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
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Service Station 34










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