Railroad Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.


HOME
PAGE
AD
PAGE
MAGAZINE
PAGE
HOW TO ORDER
PAGE
NEW LISTING
PAGE
 
e-mail Vic with questions

LINE
DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
American Locomotive
Full color 9 3/4" x 13" ad talks about the new Alco-GE Super Diesel-Electric Locomotive. The ad headline claims that it is "Arriving years ahead of time!" and talks about the many safety and comfort factors built into this creation. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
April 29, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 15

American Railroads
Black and white 9 3/4" x 12 1/2" wartime ad that lets us know that our system of business and government is the best. The ad headline asks the question "Who was it said, 'Democracy is inefficient'!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 31, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 19

Amtrak
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad has a photo of a pair of male hands holding two model trains in one hand and one on the other. The ad headline claims that "We've rejected 2 out of every 3 cars you used to ride on the railroad." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 3, 1971
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Railroad 36

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 8" x 11" ad for the continual Upkeep and Improvement that goes on in the Railroad Industry. The headline calls it "A Job that's never Finished" and has a picture of a man who is tightening up the nuts on the side of a railroad track pausing long enough to look up at the camera. The text give a fairly extensive list of changes that have been made and improvements that have been brought about over the last fifty years or so. After impressing the reader with the efforts made by the railroad companies to improve and provide safety it warns that "This steady march of progress cannot be continued if the railroads are burdened with laws and regulations which increase their costs of operation, or which handicap them in fair competition for business".
November 1937
Redbook
1
$8.50
View Railroad 82

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about how the Railroad industry has always been "together" and , with 700 seperate railrroads, are able to function efficiently. Now, in this time of war, this ability that the railroads possess is able to provide for the country, "Teamwork for Victory". The picture in the ad shows three engines in the yard, bellowing smoke as they wait to pull out to transport more materials.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad / Wartime

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 10" x 12 1/2" ad for "U.S. Travel 1942 Style". The ad drawing shows a car full of soldiers talking and reading. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 22, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 4

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that reminds us that as hard as it is for the railroads to move all of the troops and supplies, it is even worse in the winter. The headline says "Soldiers on the Winter Front" and has a picture of a fully-loaded train working its way through a heavy snowfall. The text talks about the many things that the American Railroad companies have to do extra to keep the supplies going and mentions a few things that regular passengers can do to alleviate problems.
February 8, 1943
Life magazine
0
$8.50
View Wartime / Railroad

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the effort put forth by this group to handle the twice as much freight, four times as much passenger traffic while using no more equipment than they had before the war. There is a drawing of an old coal engine with the headline claiming that "We've got everything working but This One". They admit that it has taken a lot of effort and planning but the worst may still be to come when the war is over and they have to cnange everything over to a new system.
February 21, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Wartime / Railroad

Association of American Railroads
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of a comfortable couple sitting on a train that is travelling through the countryside. The ad headline asks if you would "Like to ride on a train like this?" and explains how the materials used to manufacture these cars are now being used for the war effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 22, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 27

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Railroads part in Effective Preparedness for National Defense. The ad has a picture of five train engines stopped in a "V" formation and the text gives statistics that show how important they are to the military and how much they have improved their programs and equipment to make this possible.
September 11, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 91

Association of American Railroads
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad has a photo of a Japanese Railroad Engineer leaning out of his engine with a serious look on his face. The ad headline has some Japanese characters with the words "(Meaning: Progress on Japan's railroads!)" underneath. The ad text explains how the Japanese government is helping the railroad industry more than our government is. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 26, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Railroad 34

Canadian National
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad where "The Largest Railway System in America" is trying to get the public to "Come to Canada this Summer". The ad has small pictures of sights to see and the ad talks about Come North, The Provinces by the Sea, Old Quebec, The Highlands of Ontario, Minaki on the Winnipeg River and Jasper National Park.
March 1928
National Geographic
1
$9.00
View Railroad 64

Canadian Pacific
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 1/4" ad for their Imperial Limited Route which went from Montreal to Vancouver, 2906 miles in 100 hours Every Day. There is a picture in the ad of the Great Selkirk Glacier which was one of the scenic landmarks that this train passed during its trip. The text mentions that the Upper Lake Steamships would connect at Fort Williams with this train and mentions the many places you could travel from there. It also mentions that Swiss Guides were stationed at Banff, Lakes in the Clouds, Fields and the Great Glacier "to assist Canadian Pacific passenters to mountain climbing and exploration. There is also a map that shows the various Canadian Pacific Overland Routes. This ad has several spots on the right border which are visible in the scanned view.
August 1900
McClure's Magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 69

Canadian Pacific
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the wonderful places you can visit on a Canadian Pacific train. The headline next to a drawing of a smiling man claims that he has "Got a Date with a Canadian Pacific Vacation". The ad contains colorful drawings of places you can go and stay and the text mentions "West to the Canadian Rockies and Alaska or East to Old Quebec and the Atlantic seaboard" and gives a list of sports to indulge in, or to just loaf.
April 1947
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Railroad 87

Canadian Pacific
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad with a picture of The Canadian, a luxurious scenic dome streamliner rolling past some beautiful peaks of the Canadian Rockies. The ad headline claims that you can "See more of magnificent Canada from Canadian Pacific's ultra-modern Scenic Dome trains".
May 1959
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Railroad 39

Chesapeake & Ohio
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad with a "Memo from the C & O to the New York Central". There is a drawing of a bored couple sitting in their train seats as the train waits at Chicago and the text explains how they now have through coast-to-coast trains.
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 14

Chesapeake & Ohio Railway
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad with a futuristic drawing of Train X. The ad headline is "Memo No. 5 from the C & O to the New York Central" and talks about the future trains that will be developed.
April 5, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 8

Erie
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that makes you aware that a large portion of the country is primed for your country to build a new plant and be close to everything due to the Erie Railroad. There is an aerial photo of a section near Fair Lawn, New Jersey waiting for development with a highway on one side and the Erie Railroad on the other. This location is also only 40 minutes from Manhattan. The ad has a map that shows the portions of the country that are serviced by the Erie Railroad so that you can make your big plans on how to expand your company.
December 1955
Fortune
1
$8.00
View Railroad 89

GM
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Diesel Power Locomotives. The ad has a drawing of a train load of Army trucks and tanks being moved. The ad headline reminds us that "War Jobs well done mean Lower Future Power cost" and mentions that the engines in these vehicles as well as the train pulling them are diesels made by GM.
June 1943
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 52

GM
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for the GM Diesel Power Locomotives. The ad has a drawing of two engines "Double-heading on old Vista Pass in 1881" and another drawing of the modern diesels now being used by the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad to haul loads over the Rockies. The ad headline claims that "The curtain lifts on Tomorrow's Railroading".
January 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 42

GM
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Diesel Power Locomotives. The ad has a copy of a Currier & Ives drawing of a crack "Express Train" of 1865 as well as a drawing of a GM diesel pulling one of the many war traffic loads being handled by Western Pacific Railroad. The ad headline informs us that "A New Day Dawns in Railroading".
November 1943
& March 1944
National Geographic
2
$8.00
View Railroad 50

GM
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Diesel Locomotives. The ad has a drawing of The LaFayette which was an engine in use by B & O in 1837 and another drawing of the latest GM Diesels pulling a line of "B & O's highest class freight". The ad headline calls it the "Preface of a new era".
July 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 47

GM
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Diesel Power locomotives. The ad has a drawing of Promontory Point, Utah on May 10, 1859 when the nation was linked by rail. The ad headline says "All aboard for Tomorrow".
May 1947
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 46

GM
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that talks about how if you travel on one of the Diesel Locomotives from their Electro-Motive Division you can "See America First Class". There is a drawing of the Alamo being visited by many curious visitors and the caption tells us that this location is accessible by The Texas Special. The text talks about some of the benefits of these engines and claims that they head "197 of the nation's fastest, finest trains" which was a majority of the diesel-powered trains in the nation.
February 1949
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Railroad 92

Great Northern Railway
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that wants to excite you with the amazing scenery that can be viewed from their Great Domes as you travel from Chicago to Seattle-Portland. There is a drawing of the inside of one of these cars as it travels through a mountainous landscape which is amazingly visible from the seats. Surprisingly it seems that only one person is bothering to look outside, everyone else seems to be looking at something in their hands. The headline tells us that "Skyscrapers are made to be looked up to" and talks about the scenic views that will be available to you, mountails high up and eye-level objects that will occupy your waking moments of travel. They urged you to send away for your free folders of their trips.
April 26, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Railroad 94

Lackawanna Railroad
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad has a drawing of a train of today and a smaller drawing of one from 100 years ago. The ad headline says that "Phoebe Snow rubbed her eyes!" while the text talks about the Phoebe Snow Streamliner that makes the trip between New York and Buffalo. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view..
October 15, 1941
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 23

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Milwaukee Road
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" wartime ad for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. paul and Pacific Railroad. The ad has a drawing of German Soldiers reacting in panic to explosions going on around them. The ad headline claims they are "...compliments of Milwaukee Road 'white coal" and the ad text explains that the term "white coal" refers to the electricity that is used to "move Milwaukee Road trains actoss the Rockies, Bitter Roots and Cascades".
November 1943
National Geographic
1
$8.50
View Railroad / Wartime

Milwaukee Road
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" wartime ad for the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. The ad has a drawing of a train station crowded with people waiting for a train to arrive. With these people is an anxious dog waiting with them. The ad headline calls him "The 'pup' that meets all trains" and the text of the ad talks about how important the train station has become in this time of war. The ad also contains a map showing the routes used at this time.
July 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.50
View Railroad 51

Milwaukee Road
Full color 4 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their Olympian Hiawathas which was a service between Chicago and the Pacific Northwest. The headline under a drawing of a comfortable car with tables and a bar is the statement claiming to be "Timed for your most glorious Vacation". The text explains that post-war production of equipment is coming along but they didn't want to wait for everything new so ten cars out of the twelve on each train will be new. As soon as available the two distinctive, new, all-room cars will be added to the trains replacing the cars currently being used. It then mentions the diesel-powered engines and the wonderful views of nature to be seen on each journey.
April 1947
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Railroad 88

New Haven R.R.
Black and white 10" x 13" ad entitled "The Kid in Upper 4". The ad drawings show several bunks in a traveling troop train with the young soldiers asleep in the lower bunks while one boy in an upper bunk lies awake thinking about the destination.
November 22, 1942
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 7

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

New York Central
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" wartime ad that has a drawing of a young boy with his dog standing on a hill-top waving to a passing freight train. The ad text tells a story of this boy who grew up, turning twenty-one on December 7, 1941, and is now overseas. The father vows to do everything he can to keep his train running to get supplies to their destination on time. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Wartime Railroad

New York Central
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" wartime ad for "One of America's Railroads - All United for Victory". The ad contains an overhead schematic of a New York Central Dining Car that is intended to explain how they achieve "Wartime Housekeeping on Wheels".
November 1943
National Geographic
0
$8.00
View Railroad 45

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

New York Central
Three color 9 3/4" x 12 1/2" ad has a drawing of a Railroad Tower that shows all of the improvements that make shipping by rail more efficient. The ad headline says that this is "The Signal Corps in action". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 20

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

New York Central
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Water Level Route. The ad has a picture of a train of shiny cars moving into the darkness with pleased passengers visible in the lit windows. The ad headline claims that "We've got your Slumber Number on the Water Level Route" and there are three pictures asking "Is Climate your No. 1 slumber need?" or "Does Privacy rate first with you?" "Or is your Bed most important?" with pictures and descriptions as to why New York Central can meet your needs. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 28, 1946
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 62

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

New York Central
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad has a drawing of an oncoming Pacemaker Dieseliner and a smaller drawing of an earlier Merchandiser. The ad headline explains "Success story (to be continued)".
April 5, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 9

New York Central
Three color 6 1/2" x 10" ad that talks about the trips from the heart of one city to the heart of another. The main picture shows a train bursting through a pair of hearts as the headline calls the trip "Heart to Heart". An unknown person is saying "I love to board my Central train at a central, downtown station. From city's heart to city's heart...it's an overnight vacation". There are smaller pictures with captions talking about "refreshments when the day is done", getting to "dine at leisure from a table set in style", retiring to a "hotel-room-on-wheels" and being able to enjoy privacy in a room that's "equipped with everything at hand". The text mentions seven of New York Central's Dreamliners by name and what the routes they take are.
February 1951
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 79

North Coast Limited
Full color 9 3/4" x 12" ad for their Vista Dome. The ad has a drawing of a filled Vista Dome car going through the scenic Northwest as all the passengers are able to see with great clarity the beauty of the countryside. The ad headline calls this an "Exciting new way to see the Northwest". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Railroad 29

Northern Pacific Railway
Black and white 4 1/2" x 10 1/4" ad for their North Coast Limited. About half of the ad is taken up with a picture of a river bordered with pine trees and a picturesque mountain range in the background. The headline asks if you are "Going West?" and mentions locations like California, National Parks, Yellowstone, Rainier, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Montana-Wyoming or Dude Ranches. The text claims that the air-conditioned North Coast Limited has a route that passes a thousand miles of mountains and rivers and is unsurpassed for scenic beauty. The ad also includes a picture of "San Francisco in 1939" to whet your appetite if scenery isn't what gets your attention.
March 1939
Redbook
0
$8.50
View Railroad 76

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Northern Pacific
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for the North Coast Limited to Yellowstone. The ad has a photo of bears in the park and another of a porter about to call everyone to one of their lavish meals.
April 1941
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 40

Pennsylvania Railroad
"It's always fair weather...when you ride this great All-Weather Fleet". Full color ad shows a farmer watching a train flying through the picturesque countryside and a smaller drawing of people enjoying the comforts of the dining car June 30, 1941
Life magazine
0 $8.00 View Railroad 2

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Pennsylvania Railroad
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that gives a Report to the Nation about the massive new responsibilities that the railroads are trying to handle while still keeping the old ones under control. The pictures with their captions mention hauling the most freight in their history, having to keep industry going at top speed, dealing with the harvests of the many farms, having to "pinch hit" for oil tankers on the transfer of petroleum, having to move triple the number of troops as last year yet still meet the needs of passengers and thansporting items for the home.
Unknown
1
$8.00
View Railroad 90

Pennsylvania Railroad
"Power to pace the future" Full color ad shows a drawing of one of the new 'streamliners' that Pennsy is putting into service January 22, 1945
Life magazine
0 $8.00 View Railroad 1

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Pennsylvania Railroad
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing that shows a coach full of very comfortable people. The ad headline says there is "Room to Relax...Room to Roam in these New Coaches!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 6, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 30

Pennsylvania Railroad
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a drawing of a family of three getting onto a Pullman Car that is one of a line of vivid red Pennsylvania cars. The ad headline shouts out "All Aboard...for a Happy Vacation, Go by Train!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 13, 1949
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 22

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Pullman
Black and white 7 3/4" x 11" ad that has Famous Travel Authority Clara Laughlin recomending to everyone that they should travel by Pullman. She talks about how this is the best way of travel that she has found and her feelings are seconded by famous New York handwriting analyst Shirley Spencer. The feature that she likes best is the individual ventilating systems and the text talks general qualities plus the fact that there were no fatalities during 1935 and 1936.
April 1937
Good Housekeeping
1
$8.50
View
Railroad 98

Pullman-Standard
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad with several drawings of the interior and exterior of these new cars built for specific routes. The ad headline says that "Southern Railway System proudly announces the Southerner & the Tennessean built by Pullman-Standard". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 24, 1941
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 25

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Pullman
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad shows a crowded Pullman car with people enjoying their ride. The ad headline assures us that "Pullman makes a vacation Fun from the Start". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of this ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 9, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 21

Pullman-Standard
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 3/4" ad that is dedicated to the beginning of production for war. The headline, over a drawing of tanks and fighter planes, is "Speeding Production to preserve the 'American Way'" and the text discusses the types of items they are producing. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 28, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Wartime 42

Pullman
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that describes what a Status Symbol traveling by Pullman really is. There is a nine-frame cartoon by Al Piane which tells a story. There is a Thanksgiving get-together and a brother-in-law, when he arrives, starts bragging about how he traveled home for the trip by Pullman. The hero of the story quietly listens to all of the wonderful services and amenities supplied to the passengers of Pullman and responds that he knows because he travels by Pullman too. The two then begin laughing as they realize that neither one will win that battle.
November 24, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Railroad 97

Pullman
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the comfort and service that you will receive on one of these railroad cars. The ad has a photo of a smiling Porter working away on polishing a set of Army Boots while several more pair sit in front of him, waiting for the same treatment. The ad talks about how many soldiers have used this form of transportation and have arrived safe and rested at their destination. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 37

Pullman
Black and white10" x 13" ad has a photo of a soldier standing next to his duffel bag while surrounded by a forest of other soldier's duffel bags. The ad headline has him saying "Come and get us, Pullman, we're moving out tonight!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 5, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 33

Pullman
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad with a wartime theme. The ad has a drawing of the lower legs of a soldier stepping onto the Pullman step that has been placed on the railway platform. The ad headline calls this the "First Step toward the fighting front". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 5, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 28

Pullman
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that talks to the public about how, in these times of war, it is very important to show consideration, to cancel your reservations on the Pullman cars if you are not able to make your trip. There is a drawing of a tearful lady sitting at her desk looking at a picture of her "Bill" in his Navy uniform. The text tells the story of a telegram that he sent to her about a 24-hour leave that he was getting and asking her to join him. She tells him that all planes were booked and the trains, even though the people from Pullman were working with her, were booked too. She says in her letter to Bill that she hopes that everyone who had tickets actually used them instead of wasting the space preventing people like her from getting to where they needed to go. The ad ends with a message from Pullman about how important space on a train really is with the need to travel in a timely fashion.
1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Railroad 96

Pullman
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" wartime ad with a photo of a group of young soldiers in uniform sitting in a Pullman car and singing and playing guitars. They are singing "Over hill, over dale, we will ride the iron rail...as the Pullmans go rolling along". The ad claims that "An average of more than 25,000 troops a night now-Go Pullman".
April 1943
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 43

Pullman
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that tries to convince the public that everyone gets treated well on a Pullman Car. The ad has a picture of three American soldiers in India. While two soldiers remain in the Jeep a third soldier is trying to peacefully convince a sacred cow to move out of the way. The driver of the Jeep is telling the other "My money's on the cow!" and the ad discusses the War Department's Pocket Guide to India which instructs the soldiers to "Treat every cow with respect" which is the way Pullman claims to treat it's customers.
February 28, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 61

Pullman
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for the comfort and convenience of Pullman. The ad has a picture of a businessman sitting on his bed in berth number 8 and pulling his shoes off after a long day. He is looking toward the reading audience and saying "maybe you're the guy I'm grateful to!".
March 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 56

Pullman
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" wartime ad with a drawing of two soldiers walking through a foreign street. Several locals are turning to look at the one soldier who is trying to carry a large, ornate urn and telling his buddy "I shoulda kept my big mouth shut".
May 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 41

Pullman
Full color 6 1/4" x 10" ad for the fact that riding in Pullman Comfort is an American Custom. The ad has a picture of two soldiers trying to carry on a conversation, with the help of the War Department's Pocket Guide to New Guinea, with a native who is holding fruit from a native tree. The ad has a headline saying "Dis pella someting belong wuh-name?" and compares the custom of using Pidgin-English to the custom of passengers riding in comfort in a Pullman car.
May 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 63

Pullman
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" wartime ad with a drawing of two soldiers removing their shoes as they enter a Middle Eastern building. The one soldier says to the other "I never did this in daylight before!".
July 1944
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 55

Pullman
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad with a photo of a smiling soldier lying in comfort on the bed on a Pullman Car. As the Porter looks in on the soldier he gets the response "This is what a Fox-hole isn't".
March 1945
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 44

Pullman
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" wartime ad for the benefits of traveling by Pullman Car. The ad has a photo of a group of soldiers wounded from action in Europe helping each other on the comfortable ride back home. The ad headline calls this "The best cared for wounded in the world". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 30, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 58

Pullman-Standard
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that talks about their Empire Builders style of cars. It mentions that the first of the series were used in 1929 and they have had a magnificient record. Now they are building a new group that are comprised of Sleeping Cars, Diners, Coffee Shop Cars and Coaches. The headline says "Now building by Pullman-Standard for faster, finer service to the Pacific Northwest. Great Northern's New Empire Builders" and the ad shows a drawing of a Coffee Shop Car filled with comfortable people. The text says they will be used, at first, from Chicago West and the caption talks about this one being decorated in Blackfoot tribal symbols and the it is adjoined to the coach section for the convenience of passengers who might prefer anything from a light-lunch to a full-course meal.
April 8, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 80

Pullman
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for Pullman-Standard. The ad headline states that "Pullman-Standard is sleeping car headquarters" and has two different views of The Roomette. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
May 6, 1946
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 17

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Pullman
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a series of photos of a young girl writing a letter to "Grandma" about coming to visit her "all alone". The series of photos shows the conductor taking care of her, looking at the wonderful comforts and arriving well at Grandma's. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 24, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 26

Pullman
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 1/2" ad for the comfort that any passenger on a Pullman Car will experience. The larger picture in the ad shows a tiny baby sleeping with a look of peace on its face and the smaller picture shows a man sleeping in a Pullman bed. They both have their left hands raised up to their heads but the man's face doesn't look quite as peaceful but the headline insists that "You sleep like a baby when you Go Pullman". The text describes how big and comfortable the beds are and claims that you are safer in a Pullman crossing the country than you are in your own home.
August 1950
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 84

Pullman
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the fact that nearly everyone travels by Pullman. The ad has six pictures of people traveling in Pullman Cars and the headline asks if there is "Anyone here you know?". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 6, 1951
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 60

Pullman
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their comfortable method of travel. The ad headline identifies "One of the good things of life any American family can enjoy" and has pictures of a family of four having a pleasant meal, laughing as they enjoy the scenic view while playing cards and settle down for a restful night's sleep. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 15, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 59

Pullman
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the comfort that comes from travelling by Pullman. The ad has a picture of a fresh-looking woman being escorted off the train by an equally fresh-looking man to the amazement of an older man who is watching them alight. The headline reminds you that "The miles never show when you arrive by Pullman-rested and morning fresh" and the ad shows that you can Relax in private comfort, you can Enjoy freshly-cooked meals, you are able to Turn in whenever you please which will allow you to Start the day right. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Railroad 72

Santa Fe
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that illustrates just how impressive the New Super Chief is, especially to young cowboys. There is a drawing of two young boys in full cowboy gear, staring in awe down the railroad tracks at a train that has just passed and one says "Whe-e-e-ew the New Super Chief". The text tempts, taunts and teases as it says "Just wait, cowboys, till you ride it!" It talks about everything being new, from head-end to tail sign and with a new schedule too. This all-first-class streamliner will depart from Chicago and Los Angeles every day and Santa Fe will be having a whole new fleet of trains to be announcing soon.
April 1947
Holiday
1
$9.00
View Railroad 86

Santa Fe
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad with the headline that "A billion-dollar investment is not enough". The text is a personal message from the President of the Santa Fe.
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 13

Santa Fe
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a drawing of that shows the Super Chief stopped at the station and a young lady walking in the station while photographers begin to take their pictures. The ad headline claims that "She came in on the Super Chief". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 15, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 32

Santa Fe
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 3/4" ad with a drawing of a young Indian boy in buckskins and a headdress standing next to the tracks as a bright red engine passes with the engineer waving. The ad headline calls this scene "Every inch the Chief". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
April 12, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Railroad 16

Santa Fe
Full color 10" x 14" ad for just how comfortable a ride on this railroad can be. The ad has a headline of "The Lady Takes a Trip on the Santa Fe" and has a series of drawings that show some of her experiences. The first shows her being greeted politely and escorted onto the train and going to her room. She freshens up at her personal bathroom then goes to one of the lounge cars where she meets an interesting person. The two ladies go to the dining car and enjoy a Fred Harvey meal after which she goes to the observation car to relax and enjoy the scenery. The day ends with a few chapters of a good book in her correctly illuminated bedroom then off to sleep in her comfortable bed. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 14, 1948
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Railroad 73

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Santa Fe
Three color 9" x 12" ad that announces the addition of the Turquoise Room to the Super Chief that had Daily Service between Chicago and Los Angeles. The ad shows the insignia on the blue background of the ad and invites everyone to "entertain a group of you friends privately" in what was called "the only private dining room on rails in the world". This was considered to be "one of many features that distinguish this great new train".
March 1951
Better Homes & Gardens
0
$8.00
View Railroad 81

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Santa Fe
Black and white 9 1/4" x 12" ad with a photo of a young boy wearing a 1950's version of a Buck Rogers space helmet standing at the ticket desk of the railroad station. The ad headline has him telling the clerk "I want a ticket on the Atomic Super Chief". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view. April 27, 1953
Life magazine
0
$8.00 View Railroad 24

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Santa Fe
Three color 9 3/4" x 13" ad has a drawing of a streamliner heading through the rugged west on it's way east. The ad headline introduces "New! San Francisco Chief". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 1954
Holiday magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 31

Santa Fe
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their New Hi-Level El Capitan. There is a picture of a station where this train has pulled in and the passengers are loading, unloading. milling around or still sitting in the observation deck. The caption calls this train "Higher, Quiter, Smoother" as it mentions the "New luxury all-coach service, Chicago-Los Angeles". The text talks about riding high where it is quiet and smooth where you will get a fresh slant on the West. It mentions the Fred Harvey food and a fare of $66.12.
April 15, 1957
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Railroad 74

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Santa Fe
Three color 5" x 13" ad for the Super Chief. The ad has a drawing of a woman being interviewed by newspapermen as she waits to board the train. The ad headline assures us that "The celebities way is Santa Fe". This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 14, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Railroad 57

Santa Fe
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for the New Super Chief. The ad has a drawing, against a blue background, of this modern marvel coming at the reader. The ad headline says you can "Be gay, be comfortable, enjoy a new world standart in travel. The New Santa Fe Super Chief."

National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Railroad 49

Southern Pacific
Black and white 6 1/4" x 10" ad for their Four Great Routes to the Coast with emphasis shown to the Overland Route. The headline says "Straight to the land of gold led the Overland Trail of '49" and the text talks about this route being followed first by wagons and then by the first trancontinental railroad. It mentions the Central Pacific being the forerunner of the Southern Pacific and talks about now their San Francisco Overland Limited getting you from Chicago to San Francisco in 63 hours. The other three coastal routes that it mentions are the Sunset Route from New Orleans to San Diego, Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Golden State Route from Chicago to Southern California via Kansas City and the Shasta Route which covers the Pacific Northwest into Califirnia via Portland. The ad has a picture of a pioneer campfire with a group of travelers huddled around it as well as a map that shows the paths of the Southern Pacific routes.
March 1928
National Geographic
1
$9.00
View Railroad 77

Southern Pacific
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad with the information that they were offering "Five Southern Pacific trains to California completely Air-Conditioned this summer". The pair of pictures at the top indicate that you can "Go on one" and "return on another". The text describes the options as going along the Mexican border on either the Sunset Limited or the Golden State Limited, going straight across the continent on either the Overland Limited of the Pacific Limited or going down through the Pacific Northwest on the Cascade. The ad ad explains that a "round trip ticket" can be used to come out on one specific train and return on another so that you will view something different on each part of your journey. It also explains how you can use your Round Trip Ticket to take side trips to other points of interest and lists many choices with the names of the trains that would take you to your destination. There is more detail devoted to trains directed to San Diego and to Mexico City and gives a few examples about how much the fares have dropped in the last two years. The last paragraph urges you to "Write Mr. Bartlett" who will be able to provide you with the proper information and book the trip of your dreams.
February 23, 1935
Saturday Evening Post
1
$9.00
View Railroad 85

Southern Pacific
Black and white 10" x 13" is headlined "The Hill". It shows a drawing of an engine pulling a load up the hill to Donner Pass. The text discusses and describes the the western routes.
May 24, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 3

Southern Pacific
Black and white 9 3/4" x 12" ad has a drawing of a railroad man on top of a boxcar cranking on the wheel as the train sits in front of storage tanks. The ad headline claims that "Exciting things are happening in Texas and Louisiana along our Sunset route". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 13, 1944
Life magazine
2
$8.00
View Railroad 18

Southern Pacific
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for ways to see as much of California as possible. The ad headline hints "On your S.P. trip to California See twice as much for the same rail fare". The ad informs us that they have "Four scenic routes to the West" and they tell us that we can "Go one way - return another". The ad text does give descriptions of the different routes that were run at that time.
1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 65

Southern Pacific
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad that introduces the new Golden State which takes 45 hours to go from Chicago to Los Angeles via Southern Arizona.
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 11

Southern Pacific
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that brings attention to their Daylight Streamliners. The headline claims that you can "See the whole Pacific Coast from Suthern Pacific's Daylight Streamliners" and mentions that the Shasta Daylight links Portland and San Francisco with a daylight run and the California Daylight links San Francisco and Los Angeles, also in a daylight run. The text mentions specific sites that you would see in the light of day such as a total of 1,188 miles of the scenic West, 113 of Pacific Ocean surf, mighty Mt. Shasta and being within a short distance of five National Parks. It mentions some of the features that passengers on these trains would enjoy and also mentions the other Streamliners that Southern Pacific had serving the West. The left-hand side of the ad has drawings that illustrate some of the scenic views that would be seen.
June 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Railroad 83

Southern Pacific
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the places you can go on their California Streamliner. The text, surrounded by drawings of exciting activities available at the various destinations, talks about the various runs that all originate from Chicago. They all end in the popular California locations with stops at many other vacation locations such as New Orleans and Arizona. The brochures offered are said to enable you to plan multiple trips to see as much as possible and, with a "dig" at the airplane, tells you to "Remember, all scenery is on the ground. You see the West best from S.P. Streamliners".
December 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View
Railroad 95

Southern Pacific
Black and white 10" x 12" ad that talks about the "Long Haul to the Future". The ad has a photograph of the special train traveling from California to Promontory, Utah for the "Last Spike Ceremony".
May 18, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Railroad 6

Southern Railway System
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad with a drawing of a strange horse-pulled wagon filled with modern factories for delivery and labeled "The South". The ad headline calls this the "Industrial Bandwagon".
April 5, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 10

Southern Railway
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad that is a smaller version of another ad on this page. The ad has a drawing of a horse-drawn wagon that has functioning factories piled into the back. The wagon has the name The South emblazoned on the side and the ad headline claims this is the "Industrial Bandwagon".
May 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 53

Southern Railway System
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad. The ad has a drawing of a factory in the middle of a maze that looks difficult to get out of. The ad headline asks if you, as a businessman, "Want out?" and describes how the railroad can help you adapt to changes.
October 1954
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 38

Union Pacific
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" wartime ad dedicated to the reason we are fighting in World War II. The ad has several drawings of children and their parents and a photo of a young boy smiling as he beats on his drum. The ad headline mentions "The Greater Gift" and talks about how freedom and the ability to choose are worth fighting for.
December 1942
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 54

Union Pacific
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad that talks about how the Union Pacific railroad is working to improve the health of the people in America by transporting healthy citrus fruits from the western states to the rest of the country and to the soldiers overseas. The ad has a picture of a group of ladies working on a conveyor packing oranges into wooden crates. The ad headline says "To their Health" and the text talks about how the transportation of proper foods is just as important to the defense of the country as transporting armaments and troops.
November 1943
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 67

Union Pacific
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad has several photos of 1940's California and has a headline claiming that "You'll discover Golden Beauty in California".
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 12

Union Pacific
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad that talks about going to California by train. The ad headline says "Let me take you to California via Union Pacific" over a picture of MacArthur Park and Wilshire Boulevard. The text talks about the hectic pace on the California roads and highways and urges the public to be transported safely to the land of opportunity.
February 1951
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Railroad 66

Union Pacific
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 3/4" ad that talks about making the "..first train ride" that your child takes a pleasurable experience. The ad has a picture of a mother wearing a red Blazer sitting at a table in the Dining Car with her young daughter. They are enjoying a filling and delicious meal while the mother is showing the daughter some of the literature provided that talks about some of their destinations. The ad mentions the new Challenger Streamliner which traveled between Chicago and Los Angeles and offered budget meals including breakfast for 65 cents, a luncheon for 85 cents and dinner for $1.00.
April 1954
Woman's Day
0
$8.00
View Railroad 68

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Union Pacific
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that is trying to get the readers to travel their trains to the American West. The ad headline says "For the Vacation of Your Life 7 Scenic Regions in the Union Pacific West". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 21, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Railroad 35

Union Pacific
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for the variety of places that Union Pacific Railroad could take you if you were interested in a Western Vacation. There are six different people talking about what their Western Vacation would be and the text explains how each are available from Union Pacific. The ad talks about their "Family Fare Plan" and gives a few other examples of things to do out west. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Railroad 71

Union Pacific
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad that talks about their Domeliner and mentions that actor Ronald Reagan is a "frequent guest on the City of Los Angeles domeliner". The ad has a drawing of Mr. Reagan preparing to order a meal in the dining part of the Domeliner and another view of people sitting in comfort.
May 1959
National Geographic
0
$7.50
View Reagan / Train

Sold Out -
Looking for Replacement

Union Pacific
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for some of their Western Routes that were serviced by the Domeliners. The ad shows a map of the western United States with eight different routes highlighted. It shows the routes called California, Zion, Byce and Grand Canyon National Parks, Pacific Northwest and Alaska, Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, Colorado-Rocky Mountains, Sun Valley, Idaho, Western Dude Ranches and Las Vegas, Hoover Dam and Lake Mead. The Domeliners that it mentions are the City of Los Angeles, the City of Portland, the City of St. Louis and the Streamliner City of San Francisco. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Railroad 70

Western Pacific
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their Vista-Dome Trains. The headoine taunts you with a chilly font spelling out the words "Say 'Good Bye' to Winter" then changes to a more normal font to promise that "It's a Pleasant Trip to Sunny California on Western Pacific's Vista-Dome Trains". To illustrate this statement there is a drawing of a group of people playing a round of golf on a beautiful course with a body of water in the background with boats sailing toward a long bridge. The lower picture shows a long train weaving it's way through the scenic mountains with the Observation Deck filled with amazed passengers while the ad claims that the price of a train ride from Chicago to Sunny California was only $48.79. The text talks about celebrating the 100th birthday of California and following the "trail of the pioneers to Golden California for a vacation you'll never forget".
February 1949
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Railroad 75

Western Pacific
Three color 10" x 13" ad for the California Zephyr. The ad says that it is "Seasoned with Scenery" and talks about the many sights to be seen on the trip.
December 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Railroad 5

Western Pacific
Three color 6 3/4" x 10" ad that details a trip aboard the California Zephyr on the way to San Francisco. The headline begins "To California - aboard the most talked-about train in the country" and is followed by eight pictures that show the trip step-by-step. The first picture, of course, is waving good-bye as she is ready to board her car. Next a picture of this lady sitting in her seat watching the landscape pass before going to get food in the dining car. Follow this with time in the Observation Lounge Car before going to one of the five Vista-Domes to get a spectacular view of the passing scenery. The next picture shows the passing Colorado Rockies before going to the Buffet Lounge Car to wind down with a drink or two with the new friends you have met. The last picture shows this train crossing the High Sierra and winding down Feather River Canyon. The text calls this "The most popular train between Chicago and Oakland-San Francisco via Denver and Salt Lake City".
March 1956
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Railroad 78









BACK TO HOME PAGE