Radios, Phonograph & Recorder Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.

These ads are listed alphabetically by Manufacturer and then chronologically with the oldest ads first


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BRAND
DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
Admiral
Three color 5" x 13" ad with actress Virginia Mayo for their Radios. The ad shows two unidentified Portable Radios and one unidentified Table Model and contains as much advertising for the movie The Kid from Brooklyn as it does for the radios. There are two pictures of Virginia Mayo, one taken from the movie with her in a two-piece bathing suit wearing boxing gloves and the other of her sitting and listening to one of these radios. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 1946
Woman's Home Companion
0
$8.00
View Admiral Radio / Virginia Mayo

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Admiral
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their FM-AM Radio-Phonographs with Miracle Tone Arm. The headline boldly calls it "The greatest improvement in Record Playing since the invention of the phonograph" and shows a light colored unit in a "modern" living room with a lady dressed in a gown by Fred A. Black dreamily leaning against the wall as a seductive record is played. The text talks about the pull-out phonograph which makes playing easy and mentions the woods that these units were available in with a price for Walnut ($289.95) being given. Another section of text devotes itself to the amazing Miracle Tone Arm.
November 1947
National Geographic
0
$8.00
View Radio 111

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Admiral
Three color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Petite Portable Radios. The headline asks if you are "Pleasure Bound?" and suggests that if you are you should "Take along an Admiral 'Petite' Portable". One is displayed in the ad on a table filled with items needed for a day of fishing and the price of $19.95 (for ebony) is prominent. The text talks about the three colors it was available in, the fold-down handle and compares its size to being "no bigger than a camera".
May 1948
National Geographic
2
$8.00
View Radio 110

Admiral
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Radio-Phonographs. The headline claims that their Radio-Phonographs "Can't go out of date! Because of Television Optional!". Shown in the ad are the 7G12 AM automatic radio-phonograph for $169.95, the 9B14 FM-AM automatic radio-phonograph for $299.95 and the 8C11 FM-AM radio-phonograph-television for $499.95. The text talks about the features of their products and says "Later...when television comes to town or your budget permits" and talks about "style-matching Admiral television consoles" with a 10" picture screen for only $299.95.
September 1948
National Geographic
0
$8.00
View Radio 106

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Admiral
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Portable Radios. The headline introduces the "World's First Portable Radio with Speakers Front and Back! Gives Sound All-Around!" over a photo of four young people lying in the sand surrounding one of these radios. The ad shows that there is a Front Speaker as well as a Back Speaker in this radio and that it is the "First with Variable Tone Control, too". The text informs us that this radio has 8 transistors, that a set of inexpensive batteries will play for up to 1200 hours, there is a choice of colors and the prices start at $32.95.
March 1958
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 108

Atwater Kent
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their radios that will enthrall the young men of the house. The ad has a picture of a father and his son working together. The boy is working on carving a pumpkin while the father is incredulous at what is coming out of the Atwater Kent radio that takes up most of a table. The ad text explains how the curiousity of a young boy and willingness to tinker will make it possible for the family to "have captured the neighborhood record for distance". The ad has drawings of the Model 10 receiver which is priced at $85, the Model 12 which is priced at $105, the Model 20 receiver which is priced at $100, the Model 19 receiver which is priced at $85 and the Model 9 receiver which is bargain priced at $65. In addition they show three Loud Speakers, the Model R for $15, the Model M for $28 and the Model L for $20. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 1924
The American Boy
1
$10.00
View Radio 67

Atwater Kent
Black and white 10" x 13" ad has a photo of a young boy and his dog sitting and intently listening to the radio. Shown in the ad are drawings of the Model 12 ($105), the Model 10 ($85), the Model 9 ($65), the Model 19 ($85), the Model 20 ($100), and the De Luxe Model ($120) radios. The ad also shows the Model R loud speaker for $15, the Model M loud speaker for $28 and the Model L loud speaker for $20. This ad has three small stains about the size of a fingerprint along the left-hand side. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 1924
The American Boy
0
$10.00
View Radio 6

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Atwater Kent
Black and white 10" x 13" ad shows two young boys popping and eating popcorn by the fireplace as they listen to their Atwater Kent radio. The ad has drawings of five different models; the Model 10 which is listed as costing $85, the Model 12 which is listed as costing $105, the Model 20 for $100, the Model 19 for $85 and the Model 9 for $65. The ad also shows three different Loudspeakers; the Model R for $15, the Model L for $20 and the Model M for $28. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 1925
The American Boy
0
$10.00
View Radio 21

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Atwater Kent
Three color 10" x 13" ad. This ad has a letter from a young boy that was lucky enough to be one of two boys that were allowed to visit the Atwater Kent radio factory. This ad looks to be from a series of ads because it is labeled "Chapter III: The Moulder". The ad consists of a letter that he is supposed to have written to his father explaining what he saw as the process of Moulding the Dials was explained to him. The ad lists the seven stations that broadcast their show every Thursday at 9 o'clock. The ad also shows the Model 20 Compact priced at $80, the Model 10 (without tubes) priced at $80 and Radio Speakers priced from $12 to $28. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 1925
The American Boy
1
$10.00
View Radio 3

BSR
Full color 8" x 10 3/4" ad for their Phone Butler, the beginning of the end for the excuse, "I wasn't home to get your call." This unit is pictured with the headline "Stop missing phone calls!!" and the price of "Only !99.95". The text is filled with things that this machine will do for you and problems that it will prevent. There is a coupon that needs to be filled out and mailed in to receive this item of the future.
October 1974
Playboy
1
$7.50
View
Radio 142

Brandes
Three color 10" x 13" ad for the Brandes "Supe" headset for $4.50. The ad has a picture of a young boy talking ernestly to his father who is sitting in his easy chair trying to enjoy his pipe. The boy holds a magazine in his hand and he is showing Dad an ad for the headset of his dreams. The ad has him trying the logic of "Just think, Dad, if you give me $4.50, I can have a real Brandes Superior - and you can have peace and quiet when you want to read your paper". There is a small 1/4" x 1/2" stain on the left side of the ad. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 1925
The American Boy
0
$8.00
View Radio 22

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Columbia
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their Grafonola Gramaphone. The ad has a picture of a dapper young man carrying one of these units onto the porch of a vacation house on a lake. The porch is filled with excited people who rush to greet him and the headline has them saying "Now we can dance". The ad text claims that "With this Vacation Model Columbia Grafonola you can dance to the very last note of every record. It is equipped with the Columbia Non-Set Automatic Stop which operates on any record, long or short. Nothing to move or set or measure". The ad claims that the standard models sold for $300 and the Period Designs were priced up to $2100.
July 1920
Farm Journal
0
$10.00
View Radio 81

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Crosley
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a photo of a lady standing in a multi-colored gown with a matching shawl behind three of their current models; the Model 02CA floor model radio, the 52TD table model radio with two bands and the 02CP radio-phonograph with three bands. The ad headline states that "Crosley presents The Rainbow of Sound" and the ad talks about their "Floating Jewel Tone System and the fact that with their system you will never have to change needles again. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 28, 1941
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 33

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Crosley
Full color 10" x 12" ad highlights their variety of products. The top picture is of their Crosley PorTABLE Radio which ran on AC or DC power. There is also a picture of a Crosley Rondo Table Radio standing in front of a mirror so the back is visible too. There are smaller pictures of two console models, the Debutante and the Carrollton Radio-Phono with FM. There are also pictures of the Crosley Shelvador Refrigerator as well as a Gas Range and an Electric Range. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1947
Better Homes and Gardens
1
$8.00
View Radio 19

Farnsworth
Full color 10" x 13" ad has a collection of their products. The largest picture is of a living room with a Phonograph-Radio console called the Farnsworth Chairside parked next to an armless chair and a floor lamp. There are smaller pictures of the Model EK-102 Phonograph-Radio, the Model ET-061 table radio and a Television Table Model. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 17, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 18

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General Electric
Three color 5 1/2" x 14" ad for two new models in their Electioneer series. The ad has a picture of a lady tuning the dial on a Model J-805 floor unit while the man of the house sits next to the radio with the newspaper in his hand and a smile on his face. There is also a smaller picture of the Model J-51 which is a table model and of the Model JB-410 which they described as being a "New Camera-Type Carryabout Radio". Each picture contains descriptions of the radio it is displaying and they call them all Golden Tone Radio. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 14, 1940
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 47

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General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their FM Radios. This ad has two pictures of Dorothy Lamour, one in color and the smaller one in black and white. The ad has a headline that says "Listen-It's Dorothy Lamour herself in natural color on FM Radio" and claims that listening to FM radio with a General Electric product is more like hearing it in real life. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
April 2, 1945
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Lamour 4

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General Electric
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their FM Radios with a songstress who made the expense of FM worthwhile, Dorothy Lamour. The ad has a small black and white photo of her singing and equates this picture to conventional radio. There is another, brighter and in full color picture of the same pose and this picture is deemed to be how FM Radio would allow her to sound. The text talks about the improved sound you get from FM as well as having "static, fading and station interference reduced to the vanishing point". It also mentions a few of their radio programs that ran at this time and offered a booklet called Your Coming Radio that claimed to "preview the revolutionary, new General Electric Radio and Television sets".
May 1945
National Geographic
1
$9.00
View Radio / Lamour

General Electric
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for some of the variety of Radios and Phonographs that G.E. had available at this time. Working from the top of the ad is a picture of actress Susanna Foster wearing a hat with pink feathers and caught in mid-song. Below her is a console that is referred to as a G-E Electronic Reproducer and the ad says to ask to see Models 326 and 327. At the bottom of the page are three pictures of units. The left picture has an ivory plastic Table Model that is available as Model 100 or Model 101. The middle picture is an unusual-looking Table Radio with push-button tuning and is listed as Model 321. The right hand picture is an ivory color Table Radio that will run on either AC or DC. For this unit you are asked to request Model 110 or Model 111. The ad headline claims that these units will produce "Sheer Magic!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed s o the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 25, 1946
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 63

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General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad with Frank Sinatra. This ad is for their Self-Charging Portable Radio and has drawings of the complete unit and of the storage battery used with this unit. The ad calls the radio Self-Charging but the ad mentions that you have to plug it into your AC house current. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 10, 1946
Life magazine
0
$9.00
View Sinatra / G.E. Radio

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General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Clock-Radios. The ad has a picture of an attractive woman waking up with a rested look on her face with the caption saying that you can "Wake up to Music!". The ad calls it an "Amazing new Radio that Remembers" and claims it has "Dozens of uses" including in the kitchen or in the office or even in the living room. The ad explains that the radio will play for five minutes when it first goes off then after five minutes buzz-buzz-buzz. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 1, 1946
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 62

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General Electric
Full color 10" x 13" ad touts the "Twin Triumphs in performance and beauty". The ad has pictures and descriptions of Models 326 and 327 Floor Consoles, Model 260 Self-Charging Portable, Model 219 Table Model and Model 221 regular and short-wave Table Model radio. Also pictured in the ad is singing star Marjorie Reynolds from the movie Monsieur Beaucaire. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 2, 1946
Life magazine
2
$8.00
View Radio 10

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad with actress June Haver for some of the radios available from General Electric in the year 1946. The ad has a picture of the blonde actress and mentions that she is co-starring in the Twentieth Century Fox movie Three Little Girls in Blue. Shown in the ad is the Floor Model Radio-Phonograph Model 417 with a description, the Table Model Radio Model 220 with description and the Table Model Radio-Phonograph Model 303 with description. The ad claims that these products have "Natural Color Tone". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 28, 1946
Life magazine
0
$8.50
View G.E. Radio / June Haver

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General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for some of their radios and phonographs with a picture of popular band leader Kay Kyser. The top of the page has three pictures of different products available. The first picture to the left shows their Model 250 which was a self-charging portable. Next is a picture of their Model 202 Table Model Radio sitting on a polished wooden table looking like a crown on a king. The last of the three products at the top of the page is the Model 303 Radio-Phonograph sitting on a bookshelf. The ad talks about the color tones available with this product and says that you will also find "new beauty in your favorite records". At the bottom of the page is a larger picture of Model 417 Floor Model Radio-Phonograph that is being claimed as the "radio-phonograph music lovers have waited for". The ad mentions some of the features of this unit which include genuine Armstrong FM. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the out er edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 3, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View G.E. Radio / Kay Kyser

General Electric
Full color 10" x 13" ad for a variety of their quality products. The ad has a picture of glamorous Ginny Simms from the Friday night show on CBS and a picture of their Floor unit Radio (FM too) and Record Player Model 417 unit. There are also pictures and descriptions of the Model 250 self-charging Portable, the Model 202 Table Radio and the Model 50 Clock-Radio. The ad introduces "General Electric FM. Triumphant Realism...in glorious Natural Color tone with this great new radio phonograph". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 24, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 25

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for more of their products, including their "Wake-Up-To-Music" Clock-Radios. The ad has a picture of a smiling lady who is just waking up and the caption reminds you to "Don't be alarmed. Wake up to Music". There is a large picture of their Model 50B and smaller pictures of the Model 50W, the Model 50 and the Model 50WR. Across the bottom of the ad are pictures of a Self-Charging Portable, Model 250 entertaining the family on a picnic table, the Model 304 Table Radio-Phonograph on a table in the living room and a Model 417 Superb FM-AM automatic Radio-Phonograph standing majestically next to a bookcase. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 14, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 70

General Electric
Full color 10" x 13" ad for some of their Table Models. Shown in this ad are four models with shining plastic cabinets; the Model 115W, the Model 114, the Model 115 and the Model 102 with short descriptions of each. The ad also contains a drawing of singer Bea Wain who is identified as "young America's popular singing favorite" and the ad headline says these are "Today's Most Wanted Radios...At the Lowest Prices in Years". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 15, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 15

General Electric
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Portable Radios with an encouraging word from actress Susan Hayward. The ad has a picture of the smiling starlet and a series of captions that send the message that "Susan Hayward's going steady...with her...GE Portable Radio". The largest picture is of the Model 150 which it prices at $39.95 and looks very sturdy. There are smaller pictures of the Model 260 which is a De Luxe Self-Charging Portable with 5 Short-Wave Bands, Model 254TW that is styled like fine airplane luggage (then, not now) and Model 280 which looks like a Table Model "for homes off the power line". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 1948
Country Gentleman
2
$9.00
View Radio / Susan Hayward

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their line of Natural Color Tone Radios. The ad has a drawing of Miss Beverly Cochran, a Coed from Ohio State, who says of her new radio, "I'm crazy about my new College roommate". The ad shows three table models, Models 102, 210, and 60, one portable, Model 150 and a radio-phonograph, Model 304 and gives descriptions and prices. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 16, 1948
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 37

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General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Color Styled Portables. The ad shows a couple arriving at the beach, each with their own General Electric Portable. There are four different models shown in this ad: the Model 650 for $39.95 in a Warm Maroon color, the Model 306 in Fawn Tan and the Model 601 in Maroon for $29.95 and the Model 604 in Marine Green for $29.95. The text talks about the "variety of gay colors to accent your own good taste and complement your favorite sportswear" and the fact that each unit only weighs eight pounds with the batteries. It also mentions "Other G-E Portables from $19.95".
May 22, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 134

General Electric
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad has a headline touting the "New General Electric Clock-Radio with Nite-Light and Snooz-Alarm". Shown in the ad are the Model C440 clock radio with Nite-Lite and Snooz-Alarm, the Model T130 table-style Musaphonic radio and the Model P746 All-Transistor pocket radio. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 6, 1958
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 32

General Electric
Black and white 4 3/4" x 12 1/2" ad for their Model P8501 All-Transistor Minature Portable radio. The ad has a picture of this unit fitting easily into the upturned hand of a man. The ad claims that it has "Vest-Pocket Size. Full-Room Power" and that the picture is actual size. It comes with an Accessory Kit and Gift Box and only weighs 10 1/2" ounces with the battery. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 24, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 54

General Electric
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for some of their Radios that would make great gifts for all occasions. There is a small picture of four members of a family with the caption asking "Would they really like a G.E. Radio on Mother's Day, Father's Day and upon Graduation?" and the lower picture answers "Only if they like ball games, Bach, news, jazz - you name it". This bottom picture shows a clock radio Model C-465, a small transistor radio Model P-8503, a larger transistor radio Model P-975 and another clock radio Model C-550. The text gives general descriptions and a price range for these items. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 8, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 100

General Electric
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their line of Portable Radios. The ad has a photo that shows three styles: the Model P-965, Model P-968 and Model P-975. The ad headline says "New from G.E.! New what? New radios. New styling. New fun!" and the text talks about the differences in each radio.
June 5, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 39

Grolier
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Min/Max II. There is a picture that shows the original Min/Max with the caption "Last year we introduced the remarkable new Min/Max: first home teaching machine to achieve public acceptance". Next to this is a picture of the Min/Max II with the caption "This year we've topped it". The text contains a group of testimonials that speak of the help ways that the original Min/Max helped individuals and groups as well as saying that "During 1961 over 300,000 TMI-Grolier self-teaching courses worked with Min/Max teaching machines in homes and schools throughout America". It goes on to say that the low cost Min/Max II will make it easier and mentions some of the courses that were available at this time.
June 5, 1962
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 104

Hallicrafters
Full color 8" x 11" ad for their WR-3000 Portable 6-Band Transistorized Short-Wave Receiver. The ad has a picture of four hardened men gathered around this radio listening intently to a broadcast while the ad caption says this "New kind of 'information center' brings you all the things you DON'T want to get away from...". The ad gives a long dissertation on what this radio is capable of and ends with the statement "Now you know why $200 is a fair price". The ad also talks about two of their Two-Way Radios.
May 1963
Sports Afield
1
$7.50
View Radio 31

Magnavox
Full color 10" x 12" ad for some of their stylish Radio-Phonograph Console Units. There is a large picture of a man and his wife properly dressed enjoying the sounds coming from their Cosmopolitan which is described and mentioned as having a price of $385 or $450 if you wanted one with Armstrong FM. The ad also shows the Mayfair which could be yours for $198.50, the Chairside which had a price of $245 or the Regency Symphony which was a value at $475. This ad contains a little bit of pink transferred from the adjoining page in the magazine. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 1947
Better Homes and Gardens
0
$8.00
View Radio 14

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Magnavox
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their Radio-Phonographs. The ad has a large picture of a Magnavox Traditional unit ($235) sitting in a living room. The lady of the house, clad in an apron, stands with her head cocked listening to the wonderful sounds coming from the unit while her husband and young son stand on the other side of the door waiting for her approval so they can come in and listen too. The ad headline calls this moment "Our fondest memory...the day our Magnavox came!". The ad also shows a picture of The Mayfair which was $198.50 or $263.50 with FM, The Provincial which sold for $300 or $365 with FM and The Belvedere which was $450 or $515 with FM. The right side of the ad is a column of information called Frankly speaking about radio-phonograph. There are a few spots on this ad where the color from another page has bled through. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 20, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 61

Magnavox
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Intercontinental Global Radio and their Magnavox 410 Hi-Fi. The ad has a large picture of what they refer to as "The smallest, most powerful all-transistor Global Radio" and some general information about it. There is a smaller picture of the 410 Hi Fi with more specific information along with a price of $199.90.
October 1957
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 94

Metro Electric Company
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for two of their Metrodyne Radio Sets. The ad introduces a 7 Tube Set to go along with their 6 Tube Set. Their 7 Tube Single Dial Radio was available for $75.00 with a 30 day trial and a three year guarantee. The claim is made that you could receive stations that are from 1,000 to 3,000 miles away and play the sound over a loud speaker. The 6 Tube Set, which is a two dial receiver, was available for $48.50 with the same 30 day trial and three year guarantee. This ad includes a coupon that, when filled out and mailed in, will bring information about the 6 or 7 tube sets to your house.
October 1927
Farm Journal
1
$10.00
View Radio 64

Motorola
Black and white 5 1/4" x 13 1/2" ad that describes the radio that Motorola Radio designed to be used in World War II, the Handie-Talkie. Before you think that this is a prank, I have the ad in front of me now. This radio was called the Handie-Talkie and I have no idea if this was popular during the war and if everyone just used the Walkie-Talkie instead. This ad says that "Handie-Talkie signals the attack! Handie-Talkie is another Motorola Radio first". Then the ad says that "If there is glory at all in war, all of it goes without question to the men who do the fighting. We who on the production front turn out the weapons for Victory find ample satisfaction in the knowledge that our product delivers when needed". Well, that is tramatic but not nearly as good as the words from beyond. "The Handie-Talkie is a battery powered radio receiver and transmitter no larger than a cracker box. The operator talks, giving information, and listens, receiving instructions. Officers and men call it the "fightingest" radio in the Army!"
June 19, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Radio 147

Motorola
Three color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Portable Radios plus a mention of their Television. The headlne calls your attention to, what they are calling, "The first really new Portable Radios". The largest picture shows a couple on a picnic with he being responsible for carrying the picnic basket and she is responsible for the Motorola Sporter portable radio. The text gives a general description of this unit and mentions the price of $49.95. Under the heading "America's Favorite Personal Portables" are shown the Playmate Jr. for $39.95 and the Model 58L11 for $29.95. There is a mention of the Model 48L11 which is described as being the same as the Model 58L11 but battery operated only and, at the bottom of the page, is shown the Motorola Golden View television set with a price tag of $179.95.
May 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 127

Motorola
Three color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Portable Radios and, while they have your attention, their Television Set. There is a picture of a lady in a two-piece bathing suit kneeling on the sand at the beach and, coming into view, is a male hand holding a Model 48L11 battery-only portable radio. The headline claims that it will give you "More radio pleasure for less money" and, after the description of the unit, mentions a price of $19.95. The ad mentions that the Model 58L11 unit for $29.95 is the same except it is able to be used on AC or Battery. In addition to the telwvision set at the bottom of the page for $179.95 the ad shows with descriptions the Motorola Playmate Jr. for $39.95 and the Motorola Model 68L11 Dial-In-Handle unit for $49.95.
June 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 112

Motorola
Three color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their Portable Radios. The ad shows and describes Models 59L12 which was AC/DC or battery operated and sold for $29.95, Model 49L11 which was battery powered only and sold for $19.95, the Playmate Jr. Model 5A9 which was their Glamour Baby and sold for $39.95 and their luxury Portable, Model 69L11 which sold for $49.95. The ad also shows their New 45 R.P.M. Automatic Radio-Phonograph Model 59F11 which sold for $59.95 and their New Portable Television, Model VT73 which could have been yours for $199.95. The ad headline shouts "Here comes fun! here comes beauty, here comes value, here comes the new Motorola portables". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 23, 1949
Life magazine
&
May 1949
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Radio 34

Motorola
Full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad shows the various portables offered by the Motorola company for 1952. Shown in the ad are the Town and Country Model 62L with it's adjustable dial face, the Playmate Jr. Model 52M with the Armored Metal Case, the Escort Model 52B with the size of a camera and the Escort Jr. Model 42B shown in use at the beach. The ad claims their Portables are priced as low as $24.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 26, 1952
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 13

Motorola
Full color 10" x 13" ad that shows six different models of portable radios made by Motorola for 1954. The ad has a beach scene with a Runabout Model 54L (priced at $37.95) sitting under an umbrella. Attached to the umbrella are the Paramount Model 63L (priced at $49.95), the Escort Model 52B (priced from $29.95 to $32.95), the Porta-Clock Model 53LC (priced at $44.95), the Playmate Model 52M (priced at $39.95) and the Porta-Play Model 52L (priced at $34.95). The ad lists the twelve different colors these Portables are available in and mentions some of the exclusive features in their products.
June 1954
Holiday magazine
2
$8.00
View Radio 30

Motorola
Full color 10" x 14" ad that wants you to "Look at the new Motorola Portables!". The one that is really being advertised is the Citation in the top of the ad. It is a red and black unit that has a rotating handle that can be turned to tie in with the radio station that you are trying to listen to. It is priced at $34.95. At the bottom of the ad are shown the Pixie which was advertised as being the "World's most powerful pocket radio", the Spectator which had the exclusive Roto-Tenna antenna, the Caribbean which also had the Roto-tenna handle and the Diplomat which was the "extra-long-range 6-tube portable".
June 1955
Holiday magazine
1
$8.00
View
Radio 145

Motorola
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their All-Transistor Shirt-Pocket Radio. The ad has a picture of a man putting one of these radios into his shirt pocket while holding a ticket stub (opera or sports event?) in the same hand. The ad says that it has a "powerful built-in speaker" and that it "Slips into your pocket...plays with the sound of a set twice its size". The information is also given for a price of $29.95 for the Model X11 and mentions that it has a Built-In Easel Stand, a Power-Packed Chassis and a Built-In Antenna. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 8, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 96

Music Master
Black and white 8" x 10 1/2" ad for this popular brand of Loud speaker. The ad gives a price of $30.00 for the 14-inch Model for the home and $35.00 for the 21-inch model for concerts and dancing. The ad text talks about how much easier it is to hear election returns without having to use headphones.
November 1924
Successful Farming
0
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Music Master
Three color 8" x 11" ad has a picture of the Type 60 five tube radio which sold for $60 and the Type 100 five tube radio which sold for $100. The ad gives short descriptions of both of these models and calls their products "The Supreme Radio Reproducer" and calls it "The Evolution of an Idea". The ad mentions that they have "Ten Models" that range in price from "$50 to $460 and they are "Guaranteed Unconditionally.
September 1925
Farm Journal
0
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View Radio 16

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Panasonic
Full color 9 3/4" x 13" ad that suggests to you "How to choose the right stereo when there are so many right stereos to choose from". These are Panasonic's which, according to the ad, are "just slightly ahead of our time". The ad says that "Choosing the right stereo can be a monumental task. A great adventure. Or as simple as one, two, three. Four, five. Because Panasonic has put FM, AM, FM Stereo and phonos in so many right combinations, one just has to be right for you". We have the Galaxy SE-850, the Spartan SE-970, the Cahill SE-1099, the Arlington SE-990 and the Lindsay SE-3080. They say, in the ad, that they have more than these but you will just have to visit a dealer to find out what they are.
December 10, 1971
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Radio 148

Philco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their radios that were so good they were claimed to be "scientifically designed as a musical instrument". The ad has a picture of Paul Whiteman who they call the Dean of Modern American Music in the process of directing his band on the NBC Network for radio broadcast. The ad has a picture of their Model 15X unit, which sold for $150 Federal Tax Paid, and talks about it's four scientific points of superiority: the inclined sounding board, the large area of sounding board, an Echo Absorbing Screen at the back and an open sounding board instead of a sound chamber. The ad gives a price range for their products of from $18.75 to $295 and mentions their Philco-Transitone Radio that was designed for cars and boats that have an aerial already installed. The price for this was $69.50 or $79.50 for one that was ALL ELECTRIC (no dry batteries). This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edg es of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 3, 1932
Saturday Evening Post
0
$8.50
View Radio 55

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Philco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" wartime ad that has a photo of a U.S. Navy blimp flying over a convoy of ships that are crossing the Atlantic. The ad headline says "Fighting Today...To Give You Greater Joys Tomorrow!" and the ad text explains how Philco is building radios that are helping to offset the German submarines. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Philco

Philco
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their 420 Ivory and 350 Portable models. The ad has a photo of the 420 sitting on a table and the 350 sitting on a lady's lap. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 10, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 36

Philco Bing Crosby doing an ad for Philco 1201 record player. 5 1/4" x 11" black and white ad also mentions his Wednesday evening radio show. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view. February 1947
Cosmopolitan
0
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Philco
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for the Philco 1201 Radio Phonograph. The ad has a picture of an evening scene in the living room with a mother and daughter wearing matching clothes and playing records. The picture shows the mother sitting in the chair choosing what records to play and the little girl is sliding the record into the machine to play it which, according to the claim, is all that is necessary to use this item. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 17, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 46

Philco
Black and white 10" x 14" ad with Bing Crosby. The ad shows Bing sitting next a Hi-Fi fooling with the Phonograph. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 24, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Crosby / Philco

Philco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for ideas to help you with your Christmas shopping. The ad has a picture of Santa Claus standing next to a smiling young boy. He is talking to him about Christmas gifts and the ad headline has him finishing up by saying "and best of all, a Philco". Shown in a clockwise manner surrounding them are Model 920 Table Radio for $37.95, Model 621 Portable Radio for $39.95, Model 1422 Table Combination Radio & Phonograph for $99.95, Model 1721 Floor Console Radio-Phonograph for $229.95, Model 520 Table Radio that was called their lowest price radio at $17.95, Model 527-1 Automatic Clock Radio at $39.95 and the Model 923 AM-FM Radio for $69.95. These are called "the finest, most powerful radios Philco has ever made in 19 years of unchallenged leadership". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 12, 1949
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 71

Philco
Black and white 10" x 14" ad designed to help you with your Christmas shopping. There is a small picture of Santa with one arm around a little boy and the other pointing as he says ",,,and Best of All, Philco". There are eight pictures showing different products that Philco hoped to tempt you with when you were preparing your Christmas list. There was a Combination Lamp and Automatic Clock-Radio with the Special Service Band Philco 706, there was a Radio-Phonograph Philco 1350, a TV-Convertible Radio Phonograph Philco 1750, a Worldwide Reception radio with 9 tuning bands Philco 960, an Automatic Clock Radio with the Special Service Band Philco 804, a Multiwave Portable Philco 658, a Clock Radio in Ivory or Mahogany finish Philco 950 and another style Clock Radio in Modern Ebony or Swedish Red Philco 563
December 1, 1952
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 103

Philco
Black and white 8" x 11 1/2" ad for some of their Portable products. The largest picture is of their Sportster Model 655 which is called a 3-Way Portable Radio which will play powered by AC, by DC or by batteries. There is also a product called The Overnighter Model 665 which is a combination of a 3-way radio and a vanity case. Lastly there is The First Mate Model 667 which is a powerful 3-way Marine portable with a built-in flashlight.
May 9, 1955
Sports Illustrated
1
$7.50
View Radio 66

Philco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for some of their Rough Rider 3-way Portable Radios. They make the claim that these radios are "Styled with Swagger...Packed with Power...Rarin' to Go!". The largest picture is of the Mustang Model 676 which is identified as being "Leather-tough, Leather-handsome" and is called "The real powerhouse of portable radios". There are smaller pictures of the Sportster Model 675, the Knockabout Model 672 and the Rancher Model 670. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 28, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 86

RCA Radiola
Black and white 7 1/2" x 11 1/2" ad for their Super Heterodynes. The ad headline claims that "Only a Super-Heterodyne can give you this superb Tone Realism" and the text tries to explain how the sound is better with one of these units. There is a picture of one of the units and the ad describes and gives prices for the different units: RCA Radiola 60 $98, RCA Radiola 66 $225 and RCA Radiola $690.
March 1930
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$9.00
View Radio 89

RCA Victor
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that discusses the Magic Brain. The headline asks you to "Thrill to new marvels of the 'Magic Brain' in RCA Victor's most distinguished radio phonograph" and we see a picture of a cpuple sitting in their living room staring at a De Luxe Model No. 381 - 12-tube "Magic Brain" radio, combined with perfected automatic record changer and home recording unit which was priced at $375.00. There is another picture of their Console Grand - 226 priced at $89.95 and the text discusses the advantages of the Magic Brain before mentioning that there were "Many other radios and radio-phonographs to choose from".
February 23, 1935
Saturday Evening Post
1
$8.50
View Radio 133

RCA Victor
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their RCA Victor Record Player that was designed to "play records through your Radio". There is a picture of one of these units sitting on a table next to a Floor Model Radio and a hand has reached into the picture and is placing the tone arm of the record player on another popular record. Not only could you now play records with a minimal expenditure but the ad claims that this "New $14.95 instrument yours - without cost when you join Victor Record Society". The text explains that the RCA Victor Record Player Model R-93B would be yours free of cost, considering the other things you would have to buy, and gives more details about what items you would receive and what you had to do to join the Victor Record Society. The text also explains how this amazing item was able to work and spoke more about the kind of records that were available, and that you would have to buy from.
May 2, 1938
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Radio 137

RCA
Black and white 4 1/2" x 12" ad for the RCA Victrola and their records. The top of the ad has pictures of artists Igor Gorin, Kirsten Flagstad, Lauritz Melchior, Richard Crooks as well as a picture of Nelson Eddy and Jeannette MacDonald from the movie Rose Marie. The headline claims that these are "Yours for Keeps on Victor Records. The songs you love to hear, sung by the world's greatest artists". The ad has a picture of a console Victrola which could have been yours for a price of $175 which would also have gotten you $9.00 worth of Victor Records. Lower in the ad is a picture of their RCA Victrola attachment which would attach to your radio and allow you to play records. This item, normally priced at $25.95, could now be yours for $14.95. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 1938
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.50
View Radio 83

RCA Victor
Black and white 10" x 14" ad that shows the New 1941 RCA Victor Personal Radio that comes with a free leather carrying case when you bought the radio for $20.00. Shown at the bottom of the ad is the Model 25BP Portable for $24.95, the Super Six Model 15X Table model for $16.95 and the Victrola Model V-100 Phonograph for $29.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 9, 1941
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 12

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RCA
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Radio Equipment they continue to make, both for the soldiers to use for communication and for the families at home to keep informed and entertained. The top picture shows a flight cres with headphones on as they fly through heavy clouds and the headline says "In War - your War Bonds will buy radio equipment that helps our fighting flyers". The bottom picture shows a family relaxing in their living room as they listen to their RCA Radio and Phonograph and the headline says that "In Peace - your Savings will buy the greatest radios and phonographs in RCA history". As in so many other fields the technical improvements brought about by the necessity of war will be certain to amaze the buyers once peacetime finally comes.
April 10, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Radio

RCA Victor
Full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad for table models with the Golden Throat feature. The ad has a large picture of Model 56X2 which was an Ivory-Plastic Beauty that sold for $27.25. There are smaller pictures of Model 56X5 which it called the 12,000 Miler because of its long range features $37.85), the 56X which was a Low-Price & High Value unit ($25.40) and the 56X3 which was "designed for Young Moderns" ($33.95). The ad headline introduces with "Here's beauty - Here's radio value - with the Golden Throat!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 15, 1946
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 27

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RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Table Cictrola with the Golden Throat. The ad has a picture of this combination Radio-Phonograph both with the lid open and the lid closed. The text talks about the 3-Way Acoustical System and that the phonograph is capable of playing up to twelve records automatically. It also talks about the Magic Loop antenna and the Silent Sapphire jewel-point pickup which never needs to be changed.
October 14, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 105

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their Crestwood Radio-Phonograph Console. The ad has a large picture of the unit with the gate open and the phonograph pulled out and playing a record. There is another smaller picture of the unit with the gate closed which, according to the ad, is a position that the phonograph or radio can be played in. The ad headline claims that "In this superb Victrola the Golden Throat reaches new perfection". This ad is nearly identical to Radio 69 on this page, the main difference being that this ad does not include the description of what record is playing and does not give the model number. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 18, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 82

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Crestwood Model 612V3 Radio-Phonograph. The ad has a large picture of this unit with the front gate down, the phonograph out and playing a "RCA Victor Red Seal recording of Rachmaninoff's Concerto #2 in C Minor". There is another, smaller picture of the set with the gate closed and the caption claims that it can play records or the radio in this position. The ad headline claims that "In this superb Victrola the Golden Throat reaches new perfection". This unit also has the Silent Sapphire pickup so no needle is needed for the phonograph and the radio will receive FM broadcasts. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 10, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 69

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RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for more of their radios with the Golden Throat. There are two views of the RCA Victor 66X2 which was a portable with an Antique Ivory finish cabinet and a single view of the RCA Victor 66X1 which is the same as the 66X2 but with a smooth walnut plastic cabinet. The ad headline claims that "These 'all-round' favorites have the glorious Tone of the Golden Throat". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 24, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 50

RCA Victor
Full color 10" x 13" ad for Table Model Radios with the Golden Throat. The ad has pictures of an Antique Ivory-finish plactic Model 65X2 and a Walnut-Plastic Model 65X1 with the headline calling them "Twin Values...in beauty and performance...the lowest priced radios with the Golden Throat". The ad gives short descriptions of the construction and performance of these radios. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 24, 1947
Life magazine
2
$8.00
View Radio 7

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/4" x 12 1/2" ad for a few more of their Table Models that can boast having the Golden Throat. The ad explains that "two different methods of radio broadcasting are now in use. First, the standard kind - technically called AM or Amplitude Modulation; second, the newer FM or Frequency Modulation". The ad headline assures you that "With the Golden Throat you hear both kinds of radio in full tonal beauty". There is a larger picture of Model 68R3 which is shown in a brown plastic and is able to receive both AM and FM. Then there is a smaller picture of Model 66X12 which comes in an antique ivory-finish and could only receive AM. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 23, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 74

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RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that alerts you to the "Luxurious Listening with the Golden Throat" that you will experience with one of the units offered at this time. In this ad we see two views of the model 711V2, closed up and serving as a beautiful piece of furniture and opened up with the AM-FM radio exposed, the Turntable drawer pulled out and one of the storage doors opened. The ad mentions "World-wide radio with RCA Victor FM, roll-out record changer with the "Silent Sapphire" pickup" and the text talks about more of the features like playing "up to 12 records" and that it "plays on AC".
July 21, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 132

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for more of their units with the Golden Throat. The ad has a large picture of a Victrola radio-phonograph Model 65U with a faint background of a band playing, girls dancing and men celebrating as if they were all in the room with you when you played this work of art. The ad headline claims that if you buy this then "You spend less...get more! This compact table set has automatic record changer and the famous Golden Throat". There is also a smaller picture of a Model 66X3 RCA Victor radio in a fine walnut finish cabinet. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 25, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 57

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RCA Victor
Full color 10" x 13" ad talks about "Outstanding Quality at an understanding price". Pictured in the ad is the Victrola radio-phonograph 610V2 along with some description.
September 8, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 11

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RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Golden Throat radios that can receive FM. The ad has a large picture of the 68R3 FM-AM Table Model radio in Walnut Veneer and a smaller picture of the 68R2 version of the same radio but in Antique Ivory-finish plastic. The ad mentions that also available are the 68R4 and the 68R1 and all of them give you "Clear, true, static-free FM plus superb standard radio with the Golden Throat". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 3, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 8

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RCA Victor
Full color 10" x 14" ad that gives ideas for Christmas Shoppers. The top picture is of Victrola phonograph Model 63E. It will play either 10' or 12' records and has the Silent Sapphire pickup - no needle. Next is a Table Model Radio Model 68Rs which is called a "Twice-welcome gift" because it receives both standard and FM stations. Last, called "Gay as a holly berry" is the tiny Table Radio Model 75X11. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 15, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 65

RCA Victor
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad to help you with your Christmas shopping. At the top of the page is a picture of the RCA Victrola Model V-215 next to the Christmas tree while the proud father bursts a few buttons on his vest while his wife tries to hug him, their son pulls doors open and the daughter starts calling her friends on the phone. In the effort to describe this model is the sentence "Now his favorite records will last indefinitely" which makes me wonder why the models that I had 20 to 30 years later weren't able to achieve that. The ad has seperate pictures of each of the family members, even Fido the dog, and gets specific about what features are most important to them. There are also smaller pictures of Model 26BP Portable Radio that looks about the size of a suitcase, Model 15X Table Radio complete with six tubes and Model V-135 Victrola Record Player with an AM Radio. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 15, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 77

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the radios that go wherever you go. The ad headline says "We want to go on your vacation" and shows three radios that are capable of doing just that. Shown and described in the ad are Model 54B ($29.95), Model 8BX6 ($49.95) and Model 8BX5 ($34.95). The text assures you that "Dad'll beam when you give him his new RCA Victor on Father's Day June 20". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 14, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 101

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Victrola 710V2 Radio-Phonograph that is "Designed for the perfectionist with an eye for Value". There are two views of this unit shown; the first at the top showing it closed up as a piece of ornate furniture with colorful drawings of a band and people in formal attire dancing to the realistic music. The second, smaller photo shows the phonograph drawer pulled out and the radio drawer opened up so that the reader can see how accessible everything is to the consumer. The text gives a variety of descriptions about the features including the fact that it works on AC, that it has room to store up to 80 records, the beautiful finish and the price of $269.50.
August 9, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 138

RCA Victor
Full color 10" x 13" ad encourages the reader to "Be a Christmas Angel" by showing several gifts that you can buy for someone special. The ad has a picture of the RCA Victor 8B43 Personal radio that is small enough to fit into a topcoat pocket, the 75X16 Table Radio that has a luxury look, the 8BX5 Portable Radio with gold trim and the 8X521 Radio that was less than 6 inches tall. The ad headline suggests that you "give these Merrymakers for many Happy New Years". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 13, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 2

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with drawings and information for their 8X71 and 8R76 models. The ad headline describes their sound as "FM at it's finest...RCA Victor FM and the Golden Throat". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 23, 1949
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 35

RCA Victor
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the different styles of Record Players that were available to play the "45". This ad, just before Christmas, has headlines that warn you that the "'45' is all play and no work", that "No other system plays like this..." with the result "So everyone's going...everyone's giving RCA Victor '45'". The ad shows their Model 45EY15 which was designed to be the Youngster's own Victrola '45' for $29.95, the Model 45EY3 which was called a Personal Model for $34.95, the 45EY1 which was called the Complete Model for $27.95, a Victrola '45' attachment which sold for $12.95 and the Model 9Y510 which was a '45' record player plus a powerful AM radio for $59.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 27, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 75

RCA Victor
Black and white 5" x 13" ad for their new Tape Recorder. There are eight pictures of a man using his RCA Victor Tape Recorder in a variety of different ways and the headline says "Andy Thomas finds 8 daily uses for his new RCA Victor Tape Recorder (it cost him only $159.95)". The text talks about some of the features and mentions the Congressional (model 7TR2) as well as 2 Hi-Fi models starting at $199.95. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 97

RCA Victor
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for "The smallest BIG radio ever made". There is a picture of this amazing radio being held between the two hands of a normal sized man. It is referred to as "the finest miniature transistor radio you have ever heard". It is called "Big in tone! Big in volume! Big in value!" and the Pockette, as it is called, has three highlights. First is the exclusive "High-T" circuit and specially designed High Impedence Speaker which, according to the manufacturers, gives it "room-filling sound and outstanding tonal brilliance". Second is the Exclusive Automatic Performance Control provider which gives up to 2 1/2 times longer battery life. And third, is the exclusive "Golden Throat" tone that will give you big-set performance.
February 1, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Radio 146

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their Table and Clock Radios. The headline announces the fact they are "almost 4" thin" and has two pictures showing different models. The top picture has two views of the Model 1X4 which sold for $29.95 and the bottom picture shows the Model 1X2 table model and the Model 1C2 clock radio. The ad says that these and other radios with Flairline Styling had prices starting at $19.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 24, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 95

RCA Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their variety of Radios that were available with Christmas coming. The ad has a pageful of pictures of radios under the caption "Shop here for 'The Gift that Keeps on Giving'". Included on this page are The Starflair table radio, The Sportflair table radio, The Galahad AM-FM table radio, The Consul FM table radio, The Formflair clock radio, The Dreamflair clock radio, The Trimflair clock radio, The Tribune cordless clock radio, The Ensign transistor radio, The Travel Twins radio plus alarm clock, The Globe Trotter transistor portable, The Rockette personal gift pack and The Charmflair table radio that was almost 4 inches thin. The ad headline urges you to "Give the most beautiful radios you've ever heard! RCA Victor radios!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 28, 1960
Life magaZine
1
$7.50
View Radio 51

Radiola
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for the Radiola III. The ad, with a headline of "Results! with a Radiola III", has a copy of a letter sent to RCA from a satisfied owner listing the stations he can receive from all corners of the country. Interesting list of stations from the period. The ad also contains prices for the Radiola III ($35.00), Radiola Loudspeaker ($36.50), the Radiola Balanced Amplifier ($30.00) or the complete Radiola III-a ($100.00). This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 1924
The American Boy
1
$10.00
View Radio 26

Radiola
Black and white 5" x 10 1/2" ad for their Regenoflex receiver. The ad has a picture of an old man and a young boy sitting in a living room with a Radiola in the background with the horn of it's Loud speaker pointing toward them. They, especially the young boy, are showing excitement as the headline has them shouting "Yay - a touchdown". The ad text tells us that there are "thousands at the game. But hundreds of thousands listening in!". It then explains that it brings the activity of the city out to the farms everywhere. The ad claims that this radio is non-radiating, that it "doesn't disturb your neighbor's program" and that it is selective and sensitive. It gives a price of $191 for a set with 4 Radiotrons and a Radiola Loud-Speaker or $150 for a unit without these. There is also a picture of a Radiola X with a price of $245, complete except for batteries and antenna.
November 1924
Successful Farming
1
$10.00
View Radio 68

Radiola
Three color 10" x 13" ad talks about how to have "Fun indoors - with a Radiola". It features a drawing by Botkin of a young boy dressed for the snowy outdoors looking at his radio and his mother and younger sister with a look that indicates he would rather stay inside and listen to the radio. The ad gives prices and a description for the Radiola III-A ($90), for the Radiola III ($35) and for the Balanced Amplifier with two WD-11 ($30). This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 1925
The American Boy
1
$10.00
View Radio 4

Radiola
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for the things that you can receive with your Radiola Super-Heterodyne. The ad shows a large group of people, young and old, gathered together with the center of their world being a Radiola that is playing "Music". The ad describes a broadcast coming from far away in a spacious hall or a vast cathedral or from a world-famed opera house into this room filled with astounded people. It was claimed that "The Radiola that brings in far stations without ground or antenna - that gets the station you want - gets it always at the same marked spot - gets it simply - clearly! It's tone is as famous as its performance. Complete with six Radiotrons UV-199 and Radiola Loudspeaker.. $269". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1925
The American Boy
1
$10.00
View Radio 59

Radiola
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Radiola III and Radiola III-a radios. The ad has a picture of a young boy sitting in his room with a set of headphones on and hooked to his Radiola III. He is listening to some music that is pleasing to his ears because he is strumming on a tennis racket (the first air-guitar?) as he sings along with something popular. The ad gives a price of $35 for the Radiola III with headphones, $65 for a Radiola III-a which was capable of reaching distant stations and $18 for the Loudspeaker which would allow you to not have to use the headphones. This ad has a few stains in the lower left which are visible in the scanned view. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1925
The American Boy
1
$10.00
View Radio 49

Radiola
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Super-Heterodyne radio. The ad has a picture of a group of young boys at the Roosevelt Military Academy who are being led by an instructor doing their morning exercises to the accompaniment of music from one of these radios looking like a suitcase with gauges and a half an antler as it sits on a table. The ad headline says "One, two, three, four!" and the ad claims that you will get more volume with the Super-Het and claims that you will be impressed if you look inside this unit because you will find "Everything neat and trim and ship-shape - finished off - sealed in". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 1925
The American Boy
1
$10.00
View Radio 48

Radiola
Three color 8" x 11" ad for the Radiola 20. The ad contains a picture of the Radiola 20 with five Radiotrons and quotes a price of $115. The ad text talks about the dependability of this item and talks about it's value to the farmers because it is often their only source of weather conditions and market reports. An example that it gives is "Station WGY will broadcast the word to spray, the day the buds open to the codling moth".
March 1926
Successful Farming
1
$10.00
View Radio 20

Radiola
Three color 8" x 11" ad shows the Radiola 20 with Radiotrons for $115 and mentions that you can also get an RCA Loudspeaker 100 for $35. The ad headline claims that "The dependable Radiola 20 enriches every side of farm life". The ad has a picture of a family of five spending an enjoyable evening lounging in the Living Room listening to what is being presented to them from their Radiola 20. There is a fairly good picture of this radio in the bottom portion of the ad.
February 1927
Farm Journal
1
$10.00
View Radio 23

Recordio
Three color 8 3/4" x 12" ad for this combination Recorder-Radio-Phonograph from the Wilcox-Gay Corporation. The ad has a picture of the unit closed up and another picture of the doors opened and the recorder saving the voice of a little girl while her parents and grandparents watch with pride. The headline for this scene identifies it as "First recitation...forever yours on Recordio". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 1947
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Radio 53

Sony
Full color 8" x 11 3/4" ad that displays, describes and gives prices for many of their audio products of the time. The 21 items are shown attached to a red wall with the headline claiming "Sony to be Treasured Forever". The text claims that a Sony product would make a great Christmas present due to the workmanship going into each one and the futuristic features being built into them.
November 1962
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Radio 140

Sony
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their new Sterecorder 200. There is a picture of two men about to play six drums, two speakers and the Sony Sterecorder 200 and the headline warning "You are about to hear the magnificent sound of the exciting new Sony Sterecorder 200...." The text gives a few features and says that it is available at your dealer's for less than $239.50.
May 1964
Playboy
1
$7.50
View
Radio 143

Sony
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for their new AM-FM Transistor Radio. The ad has a picture of one of these radios being held in a man's hand and it is slightly larger than the hand. The ad headline says "Sorry it's so big. But we had to make room for the FM, too". The ad talks about the radio somewhat and mentions that the price for this modern marvel is only $39.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 12, 1964
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Radio 42

Temporarily
Sold Out

Sony
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their All-Weather Radio. The ad has a picture of Model TFM-8100W sitting on a table after having a quantity of water dumped on it. The amazing thing is that it is still able to play, or as the ad headline says, it is "Singin' in the rain". "Or heat. Or cold" the ad continues as it talks about what the rubber sealed fiber-glass cabinet will protect it from. This is a 3-band (FM/AM/VHF weather) radio that has the newly developed Sony Light Emitting Diode that helps tuning by brightening when a station is properly tuned. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 4, 1970
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radiio 72

Sparton
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their AM-FM Radios. The headline calls them a "Smash Hit!" and shows several models available at this time. First there is The Period Model No. 1007 pictured with a hand-rubbed, mahagany veneer cabinet for only $229.95. The text gives quite a few details about this item. Next there are pictures of The Modern Model No. 1005 in a Gorgeous Golden Wheat finish and The Contemporary Model No. 1006 with a mahagany veneer finish. The caption says that each of these has the same features as the first model shown. The ad also has pictures and information for their Model No. 201 Table Radio-Phonograph for $79.95 and two different Utility Models, the Ebony Model No. 101 for $19.95 and the Polished Ivory Model No. 100 for $20.95
July 21, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 135

Stromberg-Carlson
Black and white 10" x 13" ad headline asks "What a Radio must have to give Satisfaction" and answers with the requirements "It must look", "It must last" and "It must confer distinction". The ad answers by saying "Where can you find all these vital requirements of a radio set other than in a Stromberg-Carlson". The ad shows a drawing of their Model No. 39, gives a price range of $143.00 to $567.50 for their line of products and gives more hints of "Typical Features needed for Genuine Radio Satisfaction". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 3, 1932
Saturday Evening Post
1
$8.50
View Radio 5

Stromberg-Carlson
Black and white 4 3/4" x 12 1/2" ad for their Labyrinth Radio. The ad headline generously calls it "The Greatest Tonal Advance in Tadio History" and assures you that it can be yours for "As Low as $119.50". The ad has a picture of a couple standing and staring in wonderment at the No. 340-V in an Early American Maple Corner Cabinet that sits in their house. The ad also has pictures of a No. 325-S which is in an Authentic Early American Design Maple Cabinet and a No. 345-F which has an Authentic Chippendale Design Mahogany Cabinet. The ad explains the theory to the outstanding sound these units were famous for. Addressing The Trouble of empty cabinet space allowing "boom" and "distortion" they developed The Theory of using a long tube to absorb the excess sound. Finding this answer impractical they developed The Theory made Practical by folding the long tube into a Labyrinth which could fit into the cabinet. The Patented Labyrinth is now the necessary baffle wrapped up and put in troublesome space in the cabinet. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 1938
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.50
View Radio 60

Stromberg-Carlson
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Cabinet Radios. The main picture shows a living room with a father, mother and teenage daughter sitting around their new Mandarin FM-AM Radio Phonograph and the headline explained "How Mother persuaded Dad to do what he wanted!". The text explains how Mother guided Dad to a Stromberg-Carlson display so that he could "Look", then "Listen" because the real way to convince is to allow someone to "See the difference - hear the difference". This unit sold for $475.00 and the text gives ranges for consoles, table models and televisions. At the bottom of the ad are photos and descriptions of the Happlewhite for $395, the Westchester for $1195, the Mayflower for $325 and the Dynamic for $34.95 in brown or $37.50 in ivory.
June 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 129

Telechron
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their Clock Radios. A picture shows a lady waking with a smile on her face as she listens to the music of her favorite crooners and the headline urges you to "Wake to the music of the stars with a clock-radio". Surrounding the picture of the lady lying in bed are pictures of Vaughn Monroe, Eddie Fisher, Jaye P. Morgan, Julius La Rosa, Eddy Arnold, Hugo Winterhalter, Billy Eckstine, Tony Martin and June Valli. The text mentions several times that "November is Wake to Music Month" and tells you that this is the best time for going to your dealer. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 102

Toshiba
Black and white 8" x 11" ad for the World's First Three-Way Transistor Radio Ensamble. The ad says As you like it" while showing a cartoon of an artist painting on the same piece of paper three images of women. The ad claims that 1) It's a shirt-Pocket Size Portable, 2) It's a Battery Operated Table Model and 3) It's an AC Electric Operated Table Model. In addition to this, the ad shows a Shirt-Pocket Size Portable for $39.95 and a Matching Speaker Cabinet with AC Converter for $19.95.
November 1960
Playboy magazine
1
$7.50
View
Radio 144

Victrola
Black and white 8" x 10 1/2" ad with a picture of a Victrola under a Christmas tree surrounded by little people. This ad for the Victor Talking Machine Company mentions that the Victrola's range in price from $25 to $1500 and the ad headline claims that "The Victrola is the gift of all music to your home"..
December 1921
Farm Journal
1
$10.00
View Radio 1

Victrola
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad that suggests giving one of the many Victrola products as a Christmas present. There is a picture of a family of four standing on their stairway gazing at the new Victrola that Christmas has given them an opportunity to procure. Standing behind this amazing machine are a crowd of famous performers, alive and dead, who are now able to entertain the family in supposedly the most realistic manner yet. The headline says "Christmas morning - and in come the greatest artists!" and the text mentions prices running from $25 to $1500.
February 1924
National Geographic
1
$10.00
View Radio 125

Victrola
Three color 8" x 11" ad for three of their Phonographs and some of the artists that were available at that time. The ad has a picture of a Victrola No. 370 which was available for $275 in Mahogany or $315 in electric, the Victrola No. 210 which was $110 in mahogany, oak or walnut and the Victrola No. 400 which was $250 in mahogany or $290 with electric. The ad has pictures of artists Melba, Schipa and Werrenrath and gives song titles, catalog numbers and original prices of three of each of their recordings. The ad headline claims that "Victor products provide the finest and most comlete musical service".
November 1924
Successful Farming
1
$10.00
View Radio 17

Victrola
Black and white 4 3/4" x 8" ad that discusses how their phonographs are designed so that "you hear the greatest artists just as they wish to be heard". There is a picture of one of their units and the text talks about it having "doors so that the volume of tone may be regulated to suit varying conditions". The text talks in a very pompous manner about it being able to provide "the finest known interpretations of music" and mentions that models range in price from $25 to $1500.
September 1925
Farm Journal
1
$10.00
View Radio 124

Victrola
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Talking Machines and the artists that have chosen Victor as the company they trust most to produce their recordings. Shown in this ad, as far as equipment, are the Victrola No. 105 with a price tag of $180, the Victrola No. 260 for $150 and the Victrola No. 220 costing either $200 for the windup or $240 for electric. The artists shown, with a partial list of recordings available on Victor, are De Gogorza, Samaroff and Zimbalist. The text indicates that there were twenty-one models available at this time with prices beginning at $25
April 1930
National Geographic
1
$9.00
View Radio 126

Webcor
Three color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their High Fidelity Fonografs (their spelling, not mine). Against an orange background is a picture of singer Peggy King holding her hands up in the air, supposedly with amazement at the sound emanating from these units. The headline urges you to "Listen, you hear every thrilling note on Webcor High Fidelity Fonografs" and the text talks about the features and abilities of this product. To the side of the ad are shown three specific units; the Musicale Coronet ($164.95 in Mahogany or $169.95 in Limed Oak), the Holiday Portable ($84.50) and the Campus Portable for $44.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 99

Webcor
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their High Fidelity Tape Recorders. Against a green background is a picture of one couple, arm in arm, being shown how one of these units work and the headline says "Listen, everyone's an 'entertainer' where there's a Webcor High Fidelity Tape Recorder". The text gives the readers a few ideas, a few reasons to add a Webcor Tape Recorder to the items they should shop for. The ad shows and describes three of the units available at this time. These include The Imperial ($289.95 or $329.95 with a radio), The Viscount ($149.95) or The Educator ($204.50 or $244.50 with a radio). This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 98

Webster
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Ekotape Golden-Tone Recorder. The ad headline calls it "Inspired as a Gift - Inspiring to own!...the superb Webster Electric Ekotape golden-tone recorder" and has a picture of one sitting on a table after having just been unwrapped. The table has a gift card from the recorder that says "To Us - for living and re-living our happiest hours" as well as opera glasses, formal gloves and copy of the music of The Messiah from Handel. In the background you can see the shadows of a well-dressed couple going out the door. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 1954
Holiday magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 88

Westinghouse
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for their Record Player/ Radio combination they called the Westinghouse Duo. The ad has several pictures of it in use including one where a smiling lady is lifting the radio portion out and another where she has set this portion next to her bed and is listening to it as she lies in bed. The ad headline claims that "It's an Automatic Radio Phonograph with a Slide Out Carry About Radio" and, as a sign of the times, the ad assures you that it's "not a warmed-over prewar model". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 18, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 44

Westinghouse
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for two of their Portable Radios and "How to have more fun in the sun...". The ad says that Step 1: "RUN (don't walk) to your nearest radio retailer" and decide which one of these two Westinghouse Portables will suit your needs better. Step 2 is to "GO to your favorite beach", being sure to take your new Westinghouse Portable which, the ad assures you, will resist both water and abrasion with it's simulated leather exterior. Step 3 is to "TUNE IN your favorite station" which should be easy since these sets have "TWICE the sensitivity of comparable pre-war portable sets". Step 4 is "RELAX...that's all". Shown in the ad, with a minimum of information, are Model One Sixty-Five and Model One Forty-Eight and the ad urges you to tune into the Ted Malone Show, Monday through Friday 11:45 E.D.T.
July 21, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 136

Westinghouse
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for the enjoyment you and your family will receive from their Radio-Phonographs. The ad has a drawing of a Westinghouse Radio-Phonograph unit in the middle of a room and a young couple are dancing, feet flying, to the music being played. Behind them are parents watching and trying to keep from interrupting the mood. The text tells us that no matter how much alike a Radio-Phonograph may look, you must listen to how it sounds and a Westinghouse will sound the best. The text also claims that Westinghouse has a wide variety of models available and the unit pictured is the 186.
October 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 122

Westinghouse
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad that reminds you that "You can be sure...if it's Westinghouse". This ad has a picture drawn by Albert Dorne that shows an old Sea Captain who is holding a pipe in his hand as he sits in his old rocking chair listening to broadcasts from around the world with his grandson who has a map in his hand nearly finished glass of milk on the floor and a faithful dog as a backrest. Their point of attention is a multi-band Westinghouse radio with a wood cabinet decorated with ornate drawer pulls. The text talks about the "estra value features" that the Westinghouse products are equipped with and mentions many of the electronic features that can be built into their units.
November 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio / Dorne

Westinghouse
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the variety of products available and how they can help bridge the generation gap. This ad has a picture drawn by Albert Dorne with an ornate console from Westinghouse being the focal point of the ad. Sitting around this item, listening to one of the Short Wave Bands, are a young boy with a world map in his lap with locations marked and an old man dressed as a sea captain who is sitting in a rocking chair with a pipe in his hand. These two people, with their sleeping dog, are bonding as they listen to broadcasts from around the world as the headline assures us that "You can be sure...if it's Westinghouse". The set is not identified in the ad but there is a generic description of it's features. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 15, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio / Dorne

Westinghouse
Full color 10" x 14" ad drawn by Albert Dorne for the universal appeal of a Westinghouse. The ad has a small picture of a father, son and daughter having a race across the page. The larger picture shows what they were racing to. They are lined up in front of the Model 191 Radio-Phonograph and the daughter, who won the race, is sitting with a dreamy look on her face as she listens to the Jazz, Boogie and Samba records that are spread out in front of her. Her brother is sitting morosely staring at the Bach record that he prefers to listen to. The father, last in the race, is leaning against the doorframe with his paper in hand and pipe in his mouth wondering why he wasn't allowed a head start since he paid for the darned thing. The ad headline has the familiar words "You can be sure..if it's Westinghouse". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 29, 1948
Life magazine
1
$9.00
View Radio 73

Westinghouse
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with an opportunity to buy a Westinghouse Six Transistor Radio for $5.95 and a wrapper from Listerine Antiseptic. The ad has a large photo of this radio and a smaller picture of the two containers of Listerine that were offered at this time. The ad has a coupon to fill out and mail in with the wrapper and the text claims that by getting it this way you will "Save $7 on this Westinghouse 6-Transistor Radio with leather carrying case, battery".
May 14, 1965
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio / Listerine

Wollensak
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad devoted mostly to their 1500 Hi-Fidelity Dual-Speed Tape Recorder. There is a picture of this unit with the cover off, ready for action and another of it with the cover on with a caption stating that it has a "Distinguished Appearance". There are three other drawings that show it with "Easy Operation", that it is "Ultra Powerful" and that it will give you "Console Performance". The text gives specifications and other details along with mentioning the price of $189.50. At the bottom of the page are shown other products from the Wollensak Optical Co. such as their "42" 8MM Camera for $69.50, their "43" 8MM Turret Movie Camera for $99.50, their "715" 8MM Movie Projector for $162.50 and their "815" 2x2 Slide Projector for $149.50.
October 1957
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 123

Wurlitzer
Full color 8 3/4" x 12" wartime ad for the products that are made by "The Name that means Music to millions". The ad does little to advertise their individual products, more to mention their name and bring thoughts for world peace at a difficult time. There is a picture with a Children's church choir singing with a peaceful town in the background and the outline of a Dove with a peace branch in it's beak spreading over the entire scene. There is a card placed at the bottom of the ad with the words "...and the world shall be filled with music!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 1943
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Radio 85

Wurlitzer
Full color 9" x 12" ad that is listed as The Second of a Series on Music from the Heart of America. The ad has a painting of several cowboys riding with a herd of cattle through a western plain with mountains in the background. The ad headline reminds us that "The spirit of a fast vanishing era lives in the cowboy ballad 'Home on the Range'" and the ad talks about how Wurlitzer has been America's leading manufacturer of pianos, accordions and Juke-boxes since 1856. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 1944
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Radio 76

Wurlitzer
8 3/4" x 12" ad for their line of pianos, accordians and juke boxes. The ad has a picture of a group of men, in black face, performing on stage. The ad describes "How Dixie was Born" as being written by Dan Emmett and played around the country on Wurlitzer equipment. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1945
The Etude
1
$8.00
View Radio 40

Wurlitzer
Full color 10" x 13" ad for Wurlitzer Music. The ad has a drawing by Albert Dorne of a snowy evening with a couple walking past a restaurant or a club and through the window, entertaining the happy groups of people, is a Wurlitzer juke box. The ad headline assures us that "There's always Warmth and Cheer - Where there's Wurlitzer Music". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 3, 1947
Life magazine
1
$9.00
View Radio / Dorne

Wurlitzer
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad drawn by Albert Dorne for the variety that a Wurlitzer will bring to your next gathering. The ad shows a busy restaurant where a birthday party is being celebrated. The chef is bringing a cake, decorated with the words Happy Birthday to Ja.., to the table where the friends of the birthday girl laugh at her surprise while the other patrons seem to be paying more attention to the music that is being chosen on the Wurlitzer. The ad headline claims that, because of the juke box, "24 Top Bands played at her party" and there was "Musical Fun for Everyone". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 21, 1947
Life magazine
1
$9.00
View Radio / Dorne

Wurlitzer
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Jukebox Model 1100. The ad has a picture of a crowded business establishment where a beaming owner is standing and watching the people swooning over the dreamy music being played and waiting their turn to insert coins into this colorful creation. The ad headline suggests that you "Go where you can play this Brilliant NEW Wurlitzer" and there is a small coupon in the corner to mail in and get information for getting an item such as this to attract new customers. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 24, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 45

Wurlitzer
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the Juke Box that provides "Musical Fun for Everyone". The ad has a picture drawn by Albert Dorne of a small town cafe where the people inside are examining their menus, socializing and choosing songs on the Wurlitzer while they wave through the front window at their friends on shopping trips. The ad headline claims that you will find a Wurlitzer "On Main Street - Highways and Byways". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 26, 1948
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 52

Temporarily
Sold Out

Zenith
Black and white 5" x 13" ad for their portable radio with the patented Movable Wavemagnet. It shows drawings of the radio in it's case, out of it and with the back open and quotes a price of $29.95. The case is available in Airplane Cloth or, for a slightly higher price, Genuine Cowhide. The ad has drawings that show different places you can receive a signal and the claims is that it is "The only Portable Radio guaranteed to play where other Portables fail...or your money back". This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 14, 1940
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Radio 29

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their "Sensational New Trans-Oceanic Portable Radio". This amazing radio, "Never before offered to the General Public" is claimed to be capable of "new Super-Distance". It claims that the "Limits of Portable Radio listening range now Removed" and due to the new Shortwavemagnet owners of this radio will ba able to receive Europe, South America or the Orient. The text provides a list of First Time features and gives you a few ideas of what you can do with this radio that, according to the ad, is "Coming - in a week or two".
January 1942
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 121

Zenith
Black and white 8 3/4" x 12" ad for the Zenith Transoceanic Short Wave Portable Clipper radio. The ad headline states the company has received "A Thousand Letters which break our hearts" and the text talks about the many people wanting to buy their radios to get information during the war and explains that they have had to "cease civilian production". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 1943
Better Homes and Gardens
1
$8.00
View Radio 28

Zenith
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Trans-Oceanic Portable Radio that, according to the headline, was "At Home on the Range...and everywhere else." Pictured in the ad is a lady and two men, sitting around one of these radios outdoors in the darkness with mountains and clouds barely visible behind them. The antenna is fully estended and they are all three smiling with excitement as reception is achieved from some far-off country. It is referred to as "...the world's smartest, finest performing portable radio!" and the text talks about the "Pop-Up" Waverod and the detachable Zenith Wavemagnets. It would work from their long-life battery pack ,"up to one year normal usage", or from AC or DC currents. The Model 8G005Y was sold for $114.40 less battery and, the ad mentions, other models sold from $26.95 to $395. There was also a picture of this unit all closed up ready to be transported so it was obvious how secure and smart-looking it was.
April 1947
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Radio 139

Zenith
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for the Cobra Tone Arm that is being installed on their phonographs. The ad has a picture of a well-dressed couple gathered around their Model 12H090 Console that was sold for $375. The ad headline states "America amazed at tone difference in records played with the Cobra Tone Arm". Talking about the features of this unit it claims that it "Reproduces records via Radionic Wave', that it "Floats lightest on the record...only 2/3 of an ounce", that it is "Foolproof! You can drop the Cobra, even scrape it across the records", it has a "New Silent-Speed record changer" and it has a "..Genuine Armstrong FM Radio". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1947
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.00
View Radio 79

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Trans-Oceanic Portable Radio. There is a picture of this radio sitting on a table or dresser top with hunting and fishing artifacts arranged around it. The headline claims this radio is "Humidity-Proof...for protection against radio's greatest enemy!" and the text discusses hos this unit is built to withstand "swamp, ravine, boat, tropical climate...anywhere". The text also mentions where you can use this unit and still be able to receive broadcasts on its 5 international bands and gives a price of $114.40 for the Model 8G005Y.
August 1947
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 120

Zenith
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about some of the improvements coming your way from Zenith. The ad has a large picture of a dimly-lit room with a formally dressed couple dancing to the music coming from the Zenith Chippendale console that is against the wall with the only light in the room focussing on it. The picture caption claims that "Zenith - and only Zenith - gives you these Twin Triumphs in Tone". The ad lists the two triumphs as No. 1 - The Sensational Cobra Tone Arm and describes how this makes playing your records better, and No. 2 Genuine Zenith-Armstrong Static Free FM" for a new experience in listening to your radio. The ad gives a fairly complete description of the Chippendale Console Model 12H092R and gives it's price as being $425 while mentioning that there are a total of 43 Zenith radios available at prices that run from as low at $26.95 all the way up to $430. This ad is larger than my s canner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 27, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Radio 80

Temporarily
Sold Out

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Trans-Oceanic Portable and their Zenette Portable. The top portion of the ad has a picture of a couple sitting under palm trees listening to their Zenith Trans-Oceanic Radio. The headline claims you can "Keep in touch with Everything...from Anywhere...with the Zenith "Trans-Ocewanic" Portable". The text gives some fairly good detail about this unit including mentioning the detachable Wavemagnets. The price mentioned, less batteries, is $124.40. The lower third of the ad is devoted to the Zenette which they refer to as a "Vacation Sweetheart". This 5 1/2 lb portable is briefly described and a price of $42.45 is mentioned.
May 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 118

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Portable Radios. The headline calls this "Your Ticket to Good Listening!" and shows three of the variety of Portables that Zenith had available. First, being described as "The Neatest Radio Trick of the Year" is their Universal which was a Pop-Open Portable. This radio is shown in tha ad with information about it and a price mentioned of $54.70. Next the ad shows "The Aristocrat of all Portables", the Trans-Oceanic. Information on this ad is shown in the ad along with a price of $124.40. Last, but definitely not least, is "The Ultimate in Personal Radio", the Zenette. The price mentioned for this radio is $42.45 and there were fewer features mentioned and claims made about this radio.
September 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 113

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Table Radios. The ad headline claims that "Zenith Shatters all Previous Value Standards in Table Radios!" and shows a few of them to try and convince the readers. The largest picture is of the Pacemaker for which it devotes a lot of words to make it sound appealing. There are smaller pictures of the Tournament and the Zephyr and the ad says that the models range in price from $19.95 to $675.
November 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 93

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for two of their radios that help make them The Royalty of Radio. In the upper right side of the ad is a picture of a jovial man with a white beard and a crown who is referred to as The King of the Season and he is recommending the two radios shown on this page. First there is the Trans-Oceanic which is described with a price of $99.95 and then there is the Zenette which is described along with it's price of $39.95.
December 1949
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Radio 116

Zenith
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 1/2" ad for their Portable Radios. The largest picture is of The Carnival Model Z402 which it gives a description of and mentions a price of $34.95. There are smaller pictures of The Holiday Model Y506L for $49.95 and The Royal "500" pocket radio for $75.00. Some of the phrases it uses to describe these are "Powerful Performance! Trim-Line Styling! Unbreakable Cases! Richer tone, greater sound output, brilliant performance outdoors or inside!".
June 1956
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 92

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad for the Assortment of Radios they were offering. The headline claims that the size radios that were available were "From a radio as small as your hand...to one as big as the world". The first one shown in the ad is the small one, the Zenith Royal "500" Transistor Pocket Radio. There is a picture of a female hand holding this unit with information on it;s features and a price of $75.00. The big one they refer to is the Zenith Trans-Oceanic Portable Short Wave Radio with a good description of what it could do for a price of $139.95 to $159.95. The in-between sizes that they show with descriptions are the Zenith Custom Clock Radio for $49.95, the Royal 800 Transistor Portable for $87.50, the 3-Speaker FM/AM for $109.95 and the 2-Speaker Console Tone for $34.95.
April 1957
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 114

Zenith
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Royal "500" Pocket Radio. There is a picture of a femine hand holding up a Black radio with a bracelet by Spaulding adorning her wrist. The headline claims that "This tiny, tubeless 7 transistor radio performs where others fail" and the text goes on to talk about the 7 transistors rather than 4 or 5 like others have and the new Mercury batteries lasting for up to 400 hours. It also mentions the five colors it was available in and, at the bottom of the page, you can see the other four colors offered. It mentions it having a nylon case and a price of $75.
July 1957
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 117

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/2" x 10" ad for the All-Transistor version of their Trans-Oceanic Radio. The claims are abundant in this ad being called "The world's most magnificent radio", saying that it "Performs where others fail...yet it's the world's lightest and smallest Band Spread Short Wave Portable Radio" and that it's "Powered to tune in the world...8 Wave Bands". It is pictured in the ad with the cover closed to be carried and with the cover open and the antenna extended with a price of $250. The text lists the different types of reception this unit is capable of and claims "92% greater power output than tube type portables".
March 1958
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 119

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Trans-Oceanic Radio. The ad has a picture of the 9-Band Royal 1000D sitting on a table under posters from around the world. The ad mentions a price of $275 and the headline calls it the "World's most magnificent radio!" and says that "Zenith's new all-transistor Trans-Oceanic radio - powered to tune in the world". The text gives some very interesting information on this unique radio.
November 1958
National Geographic
2
$7.50
View Radio 38

Zenith
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 3/4" ad for their All-Transistor Trans-Oceanic Radio. There is a picture of a man in a suit standing in a room with a wall filled with books and pointing out an area on his World Globe to an excited young man. In the foreground of the picture is one of these radios which they have probably used to receive a station from the area being pointed to. The ad urges you to "Listen in - the world is making news tonight!" and the text gives both general and specific information along with a price of $250 for the Royal 1000 and $275 for the Royal 1000D.
May 1959
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Radio 115

Zenith
Full color 9" x 13 1/2" ad for their Sun Charger Solar-Powered radio. There is a picture of this unit sitting in the sand at a beach with the solar panels up and the sun shining brightly. The headline claims that "Now Zenith harnesses the sun to power this revolutionary new Solar Radio"and the text explains that, just in case, the radio dows have backup batteries. It mentions that if you live north of the Artic Circle where the sun does not shine for six months you can always plug it into the wall to hear the local static.
October 1, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Radio 141










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