Office Machine Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.

These ads are arranged in alphabetical order by the manufacturer and then chronologically, earliest ads first.


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BRAND
AD DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
Addressograph
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad shows a smiling lady standing next to her desk which holds many neatly stacked piles of paper. The ad headline describes this as "3 hours' writing by one girl".
April 5, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 5

Apeco
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their Electro-Stat Copier. The ad has a picture of this unit along with samples of some of it's work. The ad headline assures us that the "New Apeco Electro-Stat Copies Everything! Faster...Lower Cost and Dry!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 19, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 20

Apeco
Full color 9" x 12" ad for their Electro-Stat Copy Machine. The ad has a photo of a lady in a pink dress standing in front of a desk model machine that is spitting papers out to her. The ad headline states "Now - right in your own office...Copy Everything Faster, Easier, at Lower Cost than Ever Before!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad may not be visible in the scanned view.
March 8, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 18

Apeco
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad with Arnold Palmer for their Super-Stat Copymaker. The ad has a photo of the golfer, with his golf bag standing next to the machine, putting a ball into a glass lying on the floor. The ad headline calls it "the copymaker than never needs a 'mulligan' either...Apeco Super-Stat".
June 1968
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Palmer / Apeco 1

Burroughs
Three color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for the '40s version of the "Calculator". The ad headline claims that "23 Nationally-Known Corporations have bought 31, 089 Burroughs Calculators".
April 12, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Office machine 4

Burroughs
Three color 5" x 14" ad for their Ten Key Adding Machines. There is a sequence of three pictures that tell the story. In the first one, called "Tease", a feminine hand is reaching into the picture and just starting to lift the cover from an adding machine. In the second one, called "Sees", the female has moved her head into the picture and is looking, with a smile on her face, at the uncovered Burroughs Ten Key Adding Machine that sits before her. In the last one, labeled "Please", she is looking thoughtful and happy after she has used her new machine. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 18, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 29

Clary
Black and white 8" x 10 3/4" ad for the Clary Adding Machine. The headline calls it "An achievement in Modern Design...".
May 10, 1948
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 2

Comptometer
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad with a headline that asks the question "How do you doodle?" There are four samples to choose from with the text explaining that if you choose "D" then you are organized enough to benefit from this company's line of office machines.
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 8

Comptometer
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their line of "Adding-Calculating Machines". The ad has a drawing of a family of three wearing an early version of space suits as they appear in the year 7015.
April 12, 1948
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 3

Copymate
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their $29.95 Dry Copier. Above a picture of this unique little unit is the headline calling it "The copier for people who bring business home" and mentions that the copier at work is probably too heavy to bring homw for the weekend so having one of these at home is affordable and practical. The text talks about the fact that no chemicals are needed, works in about one minute, gives the size items that it will copy and claims that there are "Just two steps with automatic timer."
October 1968
Playboy
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 41

IBM
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Electric Typewriter. The ad has a photo of one being used in an office setting. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of this ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 23, 1951
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Office Machine 12

Temporarily
Sold Out

IBM
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Electric Typewriters. There is a picture of a no-nonsense lady standing behind a table upon which is perched a new IBM Electric Typewriter. This lady is holding up the plug end of the power cord as the headline urges you to "Free yourself from typing fatigue". The text begins with some calming words about what parts of your body will not suffer as much any more if you get, or have your boss get, a new IBM Electric Typewriter. The text continues by talking about "the merest touch on the keys" and the carriage being returned and spaced from "a gentle tap on a key within easy reach of your little finger". To make things easier this ad includes a coupon that will bring information your way.
July 27, 1953
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 33

IBM
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Electric Typewriter. There is a picture of a secretary in a white dress sitting on her office chair resting her elbow on her IBM typewriter as she looks at a notebook filled with shorthand that seems to have her highly confused. The headline says "No...the IBM Electric can't decipher shorthand but...it will give you the world's most eye-catching letters - and increase office efficiency, too!" There is a picture of one of their units, for which the claim is made that it "outsells all other Electrics combined" and the text mentions a few of the benefits you will receive by using this product.
April 30, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 42

Mimeograph
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their Duplicator and how to use it more effeciently in the wartime years. The ad has a photo of a Girl in the Office holding up some work for examination under tha headline "She also serves". The ad also contains a list of "6 Things a Stenographer can do to use the Memeograph duplicator more efficiently". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 17

Monroe
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that claims that many of the leading companies are using Monroe Calcuating Machines. The ad headline claims that "Business depends on Monroe for figures" and shows pictures that illustrate some of the variety of companies. It shows the Queen Mary, it mentions Lucky Strikes, the Lever Brothers factory and the Lily Tulip Company. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 17, 1938
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Office Machine 27

National
Black and white 7 1/4" x 10 1/2" ad shows several ladies working away on bulky office equipment. The ad headline claims that "National Mechanized Accounting speeds industrial record-keeping!"
April 5, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 6

Pitney-Bowes
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Copiers they have finally got around to manufacturing. Over a picture of their model 250 Copier the headline admits that "14 years of trying everybody else's copiers convinced us to make our own." The text explains that since 1951 they have been renting, buying and borrowing copiers and never being satisfied. There were problems with all of them including the ones that worked well being too expensive. The text explains more about how it works and gives a delivered price of $745.
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 40

Remington
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 3/4" ad shows a smiling lady working on her Remington KMC typewriter. The ad headline explains that this machine is "Setting higher standards of typing performance".
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 7

Royal
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Portable Typewriter. The ad has a drawing of a college student, wearing his college letter sweater, working away on his schoolwork. There is a good drawing of the current model and a list of it's Special Features. The ad headline calls this machine "The Natural Leader". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 1927
The American Boy
1
$9.00
View Office Machine 16

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their New Magic Margin Royal Portable typewriters. The ad has a drawing of Santa Claus standing behind a lady magician who is showing the 5 models that are available. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 4, 1939
Life magazine
0
$8.50
View Office Machine 13

Temporarily
Sold Out

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for Royal Portable Typewriters shows a father and son fishing in a row boat in the middle of a small lake. The ad headline explains this is "What a Father owes his son in August" and has a photo of the Portable Typewriter and mentions six features worth discussing. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 28, 1941
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Office Machine 10

Temporarily
Sold Out

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" wartime ad. The ad has a drawing of a police officer running and yelling "Stop!" at a man in a suit who is trying to repair his faulty typewriter. The ad text talks about how important these office machines are to the war effort and they should be repaired by professionals to make sure they are always working well. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 31, 1943
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Office Machine 15

Temporarily
Sold Out

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the reliability of the Royal Typewriters. The ad has a storyline with two secretaries talking at the office. The one, who doesn't have a Royal Typewriter, is constantly having to repair hers while the one with a Royal spends her time working as a secretary and not as a mechanic. The ad headline has the girl without a Royal asking the other girl "How can the boss expect a nice girl to do such things!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 30, 1945
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Office Machine 22

Temporarily
Sold Out

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Royal Portable Typewriter. The ad has several photos of the machines in use and one photo where important details are pointed. The ad headline asks "Did you miss these chances?...your child doesn't have to!" and the ad text contains prices for the two most popular models. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
April 29, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 9

Royal
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their new Royal Portable typewriter. The ad headline calls it "The easiest-writing portable ever built!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of this ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 23, 1951
Live magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 11

Royal
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Electric Typewriters. The ad has a picture of one of their units with an empty plaid glove touching one of the keys and the headline asks "Why does this empty glove promise you more work per typist?" The text explains that this glove only weights two ounces and it supposedly takes less weight than that to activate any key, other than the carriage return key. The text continues by asking you to imagine how much more work your office staff will actually accomplish by having these labor-saving pieces of equipment available. .
December 1955
Fortune
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 37

Royal
Full color 10" x 14" ad that asks you the perplexing question "Why does this empty glove promise you easy going". There is a picture of one of their current models sitting there with a plaid glove perched just over the "Shift" key. The text explains it by saying "Two ounces is the weight of this empty glove. And it takes just a little less weight than that to press down one key of the new Royal Electric". They claim that it is 13 times easier to do familiar jobs such as these on this unit than it is on a non-electric typewriter. You are urged to make a call to your Royal Representative.
January 9, 1956
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Office Machine 44

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Royal Standard Typewriters. The ad has a picture of a roadster with a flat tire as seen from behind. There is a couple sitting in the car and the lady has leaned over and is kissing the man on the right cheek while the headline says "Once you've tried it, you'll never give it up". The ad text talks about the affection that users of this typewriter have once they have tried it and claims that the "Royal Standard Typewriters are preferred 2 1/4 to 1 by people in business who type".
March 19, 1956
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Office Machine 26

Royal
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Electric Typewriters. The ad, which seems ahead of it's time, has a picture of one of their typewriters, floating in a green and purple box that is sitting in the middle of a field of unmown grass. The text asks you to consider their claim of being the "world's most brilliant writing machine" as not being a boast but instead an honest challenge. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 7, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 25

Royal
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Royalite Portable Typewriter. This ad has a picture of this handsome typewriter under a quarter with a graduation cap on it. Under the quarter are the words "Smart money buy" and under the typewriter are the words "a rugged Royal for only $49.95". The text lets the readers know that this unit has many of the same features as the full-size units and comes with a carrying case too. In the lower part of the ad is a picture and some information for the Royal Signet which had a price of $59.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 2, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 28

Royal
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the perfect Graduation gift, their Portable Typewriter. The headline talks about "The Royal Touch" and shows a feminine index finger doing the Press, the Push and the Snap that is usually all that is required to handle a Royal Portable. Shown in the ad is a Royal Safari which the ad text talks about somewhat as well as mentioning the Royal Parade. It mentions a 5-year guarantee and prices starting at $53.50.
May 14, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Royal 31

Royal
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Portable Typewriters. Pictured is a Safari model under the headline urging you to "Go back to school with the world's most popular portable". This ad promotes a tie-in with the Kodak company because when you bought one of these typewriters it offered you the chance to buy a genuine Kodak Instamatic Camera outfit "for only $8.95". The text in this ad talks just as much about the capabilities and features of the Kodak Hawkeye Instamatic F Camera as it does about the Royal Portable Typewriters.
September 10, 1965
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Royal 32

Smith-Corona
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Office and Portable typewriters. The ad has a photo of cowboy star Gene Autry sitting on the desk of script writer Betty Burbridge as they discuss story lines. The ad headline claims that "Gene Autry's script writer typed her way to the top!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 27, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Autry 1

Smith-Corona
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Typewriter Service. There is a picture of a very confused man with a disassembled typewriter in the table in front of him and he is holding a part in his hand with a look of "What is it?" on his face. The headline urges "...better let us do the fixin' Mr. Potts!" and proceeds to explain how precise and complicated the modern typewriter really is. After urging all users to send their machines in to Smith-Corona to be repaired it also mentions that Uncle Sam needs 600,000 typewriters to aid their war effort.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 38

Smith-Corona
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" wartime ad for how much using a quality machine like a Smith-Corona Typewriter makes a day at the office easier to handle. The ad features a photo from behind of a young lady using her flying fingers on a L.C. Smith machine. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 30, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 21

Smith-Corona
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their new Typewriter. The ad has a drawing of this model with several tabs showing new features. The ad headline asks the question "Which type are you?" and illustrates how this machine can benefit all types. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 21, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 14

Smith-Corona
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their new Galaxie Typewriter. The ad has a close-up photo of a Galaxie with a red body and several drawings of people using different color portables. The ad headline says "Give the Smith-Corona Galaxie...new in style, speed, spirit!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 14, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 19

Smith-Carona
Three color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for their Portable Typewriters that were available and suggested for Christmas. The ad headline warns that "Most Christmas shoppers think portables are pretty much alike...until they look for one with a 5-year guarantee. (Look no further than Smith-Carona)". The ad has pictures of the Corsair which it calls a heavy-duty lightweight, the Sterling which it claims is full-featured with trim styling, the Galaxie which it claims is the world's fastest manual portable, the Coronet which is the world's first electric portable and the Poweriter which has portable electricity.
December 6, 1963
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 23

Smith-Carona
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their Portable Typewriters. The ad has a picture of one of their typewriters with a Red (Brown) Fox sitting behind it holding it's electric cord in it's mouth. In a takeoff of the sentence that contains all of the words of the alphavet the headline claims "The quick brown fox has met his master. The speed of electric typing in a portable,,,and only Smith-Carona makes one". The ad talks about the sturdy construction of these units and the full five-year guarantee. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 22, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View SCM 24

Smith-Corona
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13" ad for their Typewriters and they say that if you "Surprise him with a Smith-Corona in December and he may surprise you with better grades in June". The picture in the ad shows a Christmas tree with a Smith-Corona standing alone under it. The ad says that "After the holidays, your teenager faces a mighty rough year. That's when a Smith-Corona can start looking like the greatest Christmas present ever. With our electric portable, for instance, he can learn to type twice as fast as writing by hand. His spelling can improve, too. (A typed word that's misspelled just begs to be corrected.) But, you ask, why should I get a Smith-Corona. "Because all typewriters are not the same, that's why. We invite you to...compare a Smith-Corona against any other typewriter to prove it. Compare durability, portability, features. Compare years of experience in actually "making" typewriters (especially electric portables). The phrase at the end of the ad speaks volumes, "We think we make better students. We know we make better typewriters".
December 10, 1971
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Office Machine 45

Smith-Corona
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their XD 6500 Electric Typewriter. The ad has a small picture of the unit and a larger picture on the AutoSpell button with a feminine finger about to press it. The headline says "Introducint this year's hot button" and claims that "Nobody has a portable with a correction system this advanced. Nobody." The text explains how the Spell-Right II alerts you to the fact that you have made an error, kind of like a wife. It then checks the word against the built-in 50,000 word electronic dictionary and suggests what it feels is the correct spelling. It then mentions having an affordable price but really doesn't mention what it is.
August 25, 1986
Sports Illustrated
1
$7.00
View Office Machine 35

Thermo-Fax
Black and white 8" x 11" ad that asks the question "White copies on a 'Thermo-Fax' Copying Machine?".
August 24, 1962
Time
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 1

Thomas A. Edison
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Voicewriter. The ad shows us how a successful lawyer, unnamed, is able to have his practice grow and do his job better because of this time-saving device. There is a picture of him in court, pointing his finger at a lady sitting on the stand as he turns and addresses the jury. The headline claims that "The Voicewriter gives this successful lawyer extra hours, every day" and has five pictures of him being interviewed with the captions being the answers to questions. There is a picture of this unit sitting on a desk and the text says that you can slip it into your briefcase too.
April 30, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Office Machine 43

Underwood Sundstrand
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Adding-Figuring Machines. There is a picture of a young, blonde office worker using one of these machines as the tape full of calculations wraps around her head. The headline claims that "She lists 4,000 Bank Checks per Hour on an Underwood Sundstrand Adding Machine" and identifies her as Miss Evelyn Nelson who works for "a well-known banking institution". She is quoted as saying tht "Touch operation and speed listing come naturally on a 10-Key Underwood Sundstrand" and the text indicates that she was timed while doing 296 checks, "checks she had never seen before", and this was expanded to estimate 1.12 checks per second or 4032 checks per hour. The ad talks about the 3-Point Control which is 3 miracle keys that perform 6 important functions and claims "there is at least one model that is ideally suited to your requirements".
February 23, 1935
Saturday Evening Post
1
$9.00
View Office Machine 34

Underwood
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their TelExecutive which made it possible to provide your audiences with a non-rambling speech, unless you wrote it that way. This item, based on the teleprompters used on television, allowed you to "be a better speaker immediately". It shows a man using one as he gives a speech and the screen on which his large-print message is displayed is just below eyelevel so he can seem to be looking at the members of the audience. There is also a picture of the complete unit and the briefcase that it travels in and there is a coupon to be filled out to get information coming your way.
December 1955
Fortune
1
$8.00
View Office Machine 36

Victor
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Cash Registers that they expanded their product line into. There is a picture of a cash register perched behind a row of food that is being rung up and the headline questions "What happens when 'the office machines company' enters your supermarket?" and answers by saying "You exit faster". The text talks about some of the improvements these machines offer and goes on to talk about some of the other fields that this company was getting into.
September 16, 1966
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Office Machine 30

Xerox
Full color 8" x 10 1/2" ad for their 1012 Marathon Copier. There is a man disguised as Leonardo da Vinci holding uup their 3 Year Warranty and claiming that "No other copier could duplicate this document". The unit is seen in the foreground of the picture and the text mentions several of the important features.
September 29, 1986
Sports Illustrated
1
$7.00
View Office Machine 38










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