Insurance Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.

These ads are listed in alphabetical order by Insurance Company, then in chronological order with the oldest ads first.

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BRAND
AD DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
Aetna
Black and white 6" x 9 1/4" ad for their Life Insurance. The ad has a photo of an early 1900's car upside down after a wreck. The ad headline asks the question "Aetna-ized?" and clarifies by saying "Why not be Aetna-ized with a Ten-Dollar Bill".
February 1907
The World's Work
0
$9.00
View Insurance 14

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Aetna
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 3/4" ad for the Aetna Casualty Company. This ad has a picture of a scene where several Highway Patrolmen are perched behind a car, one had a loudspeaker in his hands and the other has a rifle aimed at a man across the street who has his hands up. The ad headline says that "Protection is a job for professionals" which ties in with the ad for the insurance company that says that "There's a professional insurance man behind the policies with the P.S. (personal service)". The ad claims that "Knowledge...skill...training - that's what it takes when the chips are down. The man who has them is a professional - a man you can depend on to provide the rilght protection when you need it". br> November 3, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Insurance 54

American Fore Loyalty Group
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that is directed toward the man just graduating from college and getting into the grown-up world. There is a picture of a small male, still wearing his cap and gown, and looking up at the full-size people that are walking around him. The ad headline greets "Welcome, Sir to a big exciting world" and the text, among other things, gives a large list of the companies involved in this group. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 23, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Insurance 17

American Fore Loyalty Group
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that talks about some of the things that make America what it is today. There is a picture of George Washington at Valley Forge and another of soldiers dragging a cart filled with firewood back to the camp. There are noble sayings around the ad like "Our destiny is in our own hands" and "A sense of duty pursues us ever...in the darkness as in the light our obligations are yet with us." It then discusses the strong fibre that binds us together and lists the impressive group of companies that make up the American Fore Loyalty Group. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 18, 1961
Saturday Evening Post
0
$7.50
View Insurance 25

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Continental Insurance Companies
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Fleet Dial-A-Claim insurance program. There is a picture of a truck with its front fender crumpled and its headline broken while the headline says "Announcing a new crash program from Continental". The text explains that if an accident happens to any one of your cars or trucks, no matter where in the country it happens, the driver can call a central phone number and get the claim processed. In addition to the ease in making a claim they also offer Safety Training Programs.
December 1967
Fortune
0
$7.50
View Insurance 40

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Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U.S.
Black and white 7 3/4" x 11 1/2" ad for their Life Insurance Protection. The ad has a picture of a very content-looking man leaning against a wall while his wife sits smiling next to him. The headline under this picture says "..Security - Peace of Mind.." and the ad includes a "Life Insurance Question Box".
July 1937
Better Homes & Gardens
1
8.50
View Insurance 16

Equitable Life Assurance
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that offers you "Now - Low-Cost Living Insurance for Millions of American Families". The ad has a picture of a Father, Mother and a boy and a girl who are sitting around a campfire on a campout night. The Father is closest to the fire and he has something he is cooking while his wife sits behind him possibly reading a book. Their female child is sitting enjoying the fun while the boy is standing with a guitar strumming the chords and smiling. The ad says that "Equitable has designed a wonderful new "economy-size" insurance package for you and your family. Now's the time to buy the protection you want and need - at new low cost". It says in the ad that "It's an economy-size package" and that it has "New Flexibility".
September 20, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Insurance 56

Equitable Life Assurance
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the agents from Equitable that will take care of your needs. There is a picture of a busy, well-lit office where three smiling, eager men in suits are standing by their desks waiting to take care of you. The headline calls them "The Protectors" and says that you can "Expect a lot from them". The text talks about the special skill needed to "protect people from the threat of serious financial setbacks" and says that these and other agents from Equitable have that skill plus Living Insurance from Equitable. It mentions that when you meet a Protector you will begin to feel more secure.
April 19, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 29

Equitable Life Assurance
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 1/2" ad that stretches and finds a relationship between their company and Wilt Chamberlain. The ad has a picture of him reaching for the basket while wearing his Lakers uniform under the headline "Wilt! There's nobody else exactly like him". The ad explains how individual he is and how individual each of our insurance needs are. For that reason the Equitable Agents will individually tailor your policy to your needs.
May 7, 1973
Sports Illustrated
0
$8.50
View Wilt / Insurance ad

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Hartford
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for the ways that insurance companies can help reduce hazards in industry. The ad has a picture of a man welding at work and the headline claims that "Right now he's safer than you are". The ad text talks about the efforts of Hartford and other insurance companies to reduce industrial accidents.
December 6, 1963
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 21

Insurance Company of North America
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad that reminds us that proper planning can cause most fires to be avoided. There is a picture of a waterfront where a deck is on fire and a fireman who is trying to put it out is being lectured by the White Fireman. The text talks about the importance of sprinkler heads and fire walls and claims that this scene, where both were missing caused a total loss at three quarters of a million dollars. The best way to fight a fire is before the fire by following the advice of the White Fireman
May 22, 1939
Life magazine
1
$9.00
View Insurance 36

Insurance Company of North America
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their White Fireman service which offers ideas to policy holders on how to make their domain less likely to be affected by neighboring fires. There is a drawing of a city block that is on fire all except for a hotel that heeded the advice offered by the Insurance Company of North America. A magical White Fireman is standing next to the hotel owner with his hand on the owner's shoulder as the hotel stands firm against the raging flames.
July 14, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 34

John Hancock
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Mutual Life Insurance Company. The ad has a drawing of Elizur Wright, who they call the inventor of life insurance, sitting with a large book talking to a younger man. The ad headline claims of Elizur that "He figured out our futures...". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 20, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 6

John Hancock
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Mutual Life Insurance Company. The ad has a drawing of five young Boy Scouts sitting around a blazing campfire as night falls around them. The ad headline claims of these young men that "They see a vision that once was yours..." and, with a stretch of the imagination, describes how this insurance company helps you go from being a scout to being an adult. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 16, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Insurance 19

Kemper
Three color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their auto insurance. The ad has a copy of a driver's license against a black background and a headline asking if this is a "License to kill?" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1965
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Kemper 2

Lutheran Brotherhood
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for the Life and Health Insurance for all Lutherans. The ad has photos of the Edward C. Anderson family of Helotes, Texas and has the headline "Through the years, we've sure been thankful for all out Lutheran Brothrhood Insurance!" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not ve visible in the scanned view.
March 5, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 11

Maryland Casualty Company
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for the fact that their Insurance Agents are as skilled as surgeons. The ad has a picture of a surgeon in a gown holding a scaple as he prepares to make an incision and the headline claims that this is "No place for an amateur". The ad gives a general list of the kinds of insurance they handle and gives the motto of "Remember: Because your Maryland agent knows his business it's good business for you to know him".
April 5, 1948
Time magazine
0
$8.00
View Insurance 20

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Massachusetts Mugual
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Life Insurance with artwork by Norman Rockwell. He has drawn a picture of a father standing with his young son on his shoulders while the mother stands behind them smiling as she looks up at their son. The text talks about how children depend upon their parents to provide safety for them and the best way for the parents to do this is with a Life Insurance policy. You are urged to talk to your Massachusetts Mutual Life Insutance agent to begin planning.
March 21, 1953
Saturday Evening Post
2
$9.00
View Insuance / Rockwell

Massachusetts Mutual
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad drawn by Norman Rockwell that brings attention to how you can have enough money available to send your child to college when the time comes. There is a picture of a young boy busy studying in a position that only the young can find comfortable. There is a chair in the room but it serves as a footrest for the boy and is occupied by a reclining Beagle who watches intently. The boy is lying on his back with a pillow folded behind his head as he reads from the textbook perched on his belly and a half-eaten sandwich and a glass of milk nearly empty sitting at his side. The text starts with the obversation that "Upside down or not, he's headed in the right direction" then talks about how the cost of Higher Education is rising faster than anyone couls expect and says that your Massachusetts Mutual agent can give you a policy that will help you meet the need.
February 20, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$9.00
View Rockwell / Mass Mutual

Massachusetts Mutual
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad drawn by Norman Rockwell for the need to constantly review your Life Insurance policy with your Massachusetts Mutual agent as the time and needs pass. The drawing by Rockwell shows four young boys industrially putting the finishing touches on their Spaceship built from a wooden keg, a garbage can and other assorted items that were found to be lying loose. A young dog belonging to one of them sits watching with interest knowing that the space alloted for a pilot is too small for them but the right size for the dog. The text talks about how the needs and situations of a family are constantly changing so your contact with your agent should be constantly happening.
March 26, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$9.00
View Rockwell / Mass Mutual

Massachusetts Mutual
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Life Insurance with a drawing by Norman Rockwell. The drawing is of a couple just getting married and the husband is placing the ring on his new-wife's finger. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 14, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
0
$9.00
View Rockwell / Insurance

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Massachusetts Mutual
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for Life Insurance. The ad has a drawing by Norman Rockwell of a father adjusting a life preserver on his young son as they both stand on a dock in preparation for a day of fishing. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 18, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
0
$9.00
View Rockwell / Insurance

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Massachusetts Mutual
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad with artwork done by Norman Rockwell. The drawing shows two grandparents and two grandchildren sitting with their heads bowed in prayer while the turkey stands waiting on the platter. The ad headline says "For past blessings...a time for gratitude". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
0
$9.00
View Rockwell / Insurance

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Metropolitan Life Insurance Company
Three color 91/2" x 13 1/2" ad has a picture of two young children playing in their house and the headline asks >u?"How 'young' will they be at 65?". The text talks about how people are living longer because of better medical care and people being more active. The ad offers a coupon for you to fill out and sent in to receive a free booklet Years to Come which will help todays people live longer and healthier,
April 4, 1953
Saturday Evening Post
1
$8.00
View Insurance 35

Metropolotian Life
Three color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad with an interest in you health. The ad has a drawing with a Wizard of Oz theme with Dorothy using a can of oil to lubricate the Tin Man's knee. The ad headline says "Here's a good 'lesson' about ARTHRITIS".
October 1954
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Insurance 13

Metropolitan Life
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for the need for having your agent performing a Family Security Check-Up. There is a picture of two young boys standing together and the shorter boy is trying to use a tape measure to determine the height of the taller boy. The headline says that "Your growing family is the best reason for a Family Security Check-Up" and the text gives a few reasons why using Metropolitan to perform this check-up makes sense ending with the fact that "Metropolitan is as local as Main Street".
November 3, 1961
Life magazine &
November 18, 1961
Saturday Evening Post
2
$7.50
View
Insurance 26

Metropolitan Life
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Life Insurance. The ad has a picture of a boy's bedroom where a father is being helped by his two young sons to push a new baby crib into the room that had previously been occupied only by a bunk bed. The ad headline asks "Are 1959 plans good enough for 1964" then encourages you to "Find out with this Metropolitan service" Family Security Check-Up". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
0
$7.50
View Insurance 18

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Metropolitan Life
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the kind of people who choose, and are insured by, Metropolitan Life. The headline ponders "How come more than one-third of the people in Massachusetts are insured by Metropolitan Life". Sitting at the bottom of the are are six very different people. There is what looks like a ship's captain, a shoe repair-man, a chemist, an ice cream sales person, a professor and a very important man sitting back there with his hands folded. The ad says that "You can trust a New Englander to make every dollar work for all it's worth, and you can trust us to do the same. Maybe that's why they like us in Massachusetts - and everywhere else. One way Metropolitan helps you get the most out of a straight life policy is a special little clause that lets your insurance dividends pay for additional insurance. This way, you can buy a modest policy at minimum cost - yet still end up with a tidy amount of added insurance". You are told to call your Metropolitan adviser who will do the job for free.
November 27, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Insurance 53

Metropolitan Life
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the necessity of Life Insurance. The headline asks "How come wives hesitate to talk about the Fourth Necessity?" and has a picture that shows the same lady in four different poses. She is facing the camera as she holds a just-cooked turkey, her husband's sport coat and a vacuum cleaner while the fourth pose is facing away from the camera with her hands empty. The text explains that, after food, clothing and shelter, comes Life Insurance which is on her mind and should be on her husband's too. It urges you to "Ask you Metropolitan adviser for a Family Security Check-Up" so that you can see how affordable it really is.
April 2, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 42

Metropolitan Life
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for how their free Family Security Check-Up will help you and your family succeed. The ad has a picture, taken from inside the room where the just-born babies are kept, where we see a nurse, smiling through her mask and a man in a dark suit and a mask holding up a graduation cap while a pair of happy parents are on the other side of the glass looking in, father holding a box of cigars ready to distribute. The headline asks "How come Metropolitan Life has your son wearing a cap and gown the day he's born?" and the text explains that, for the Metropolitan Life representative, "part of his job is to live in the future". The ad urges you to make a no-obligation phone call to Metropolitan so that you can do what is best for your family.
September 10, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 30

Metropolitan Life
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a photo of several little girls, one who has a brace on her leg, playing in the yard. The ad headline says that "Whenever you meet a crippled child - remember Alice". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1965
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 3

MONY
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. The ad has a photo of a young girl sitting on her high-chair with an empty glass of milk in her hand and a worried look on her face. The ad headline assures you that "There'll always be more where that came from...with MONY to provide it". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1953
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 5

MONY
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that asks you the question "What's YOUR reason for not buying a MONY Retirement Polilcy now?". They respond by asking "Do you put it off by telling yourself...I'm too young to think about retirement" or "I can build my own retirement fund" or even "I can't afford it anyway". Their answers to these particular responses are "The younger you are when you start, the less money it costs" to the first, "That's wonderful but will you really do it" to the second and "Do you know that about MONY Retirement Policy". There is a coupon to mail in to get a response about saving money.
September 20, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Insurance 55

MONY
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Life Insurance. There is a drawing of a Mony salesman talking to Achilles about a policy. The salesman discusses how a policy will help him in time of need and Achilles responds that "My mom gave me FULL coverage". The text of the ad narrates the conversation that the two of them had and ends with Achilles claiming that he is "unvulnerable, completely". The editor's note at the end of the ad reminds how the story really ends, how his mother forgot to dip his complete body in the river Styx, not covering the heel that she was holding. This allowed Paris to wing him there with a poisoned arrow.
February 20, 1970
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 45

Nationwide
Black and white 9 1/4" x 12" ad for the need to have insurance. The ad contains drawings of two trees. the first tree is one that a road curves around and has a caption "Please drive carefully around this tree". The other tree is a Christmas tree and has the caption continuing "so you can have fun 'round this one". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 15, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 10

New Englans Life
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad that has a picture of Douglas Fairbanks Sr. with a sword in his mouth and a distressed heroine over his shoulder in the movie The Three Musketeers. The picture has the words "Were You Born in 1921?" in it and implies "Now you've reached that milestone: age 40. As you take stock, consider what cash-value life insurance can mean to your future". The ad talks about this by saying "What's happened to all these years? Forty of them have gone past since the incomparable Doug Fairbanks led the Three Musketeers across the nation's movie screens. And now you're reached a time of decision in life. A time to pause and think of your family's future - and of your own retirement plans".
November 3, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Insurance 57

New England Life
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that tries to impress you with the fact of how everything increases in price over time. There is a picture of a menu board taken in 1931 with the prices being charged at that time. There is no mention of the fact that these prices were in the middle of the Depression but everything on the board, with the exception of "Cold Milk", is priced at 1 cent. The headline says that "If you were born in 1931...Read how the cash value can build up for you in a New England Life policy. Here are figures." The text compares the value of the policy when you turn 65 with the amount that you have paid into it and asks for you to send for their booklet, The Three Dimensions of Life Insurance, to get even more information.
March 22, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 31

New York Life
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for Life Insurance. The ad has a photograph of the twentieth President of the United States, James A. Garfield, and tells a short story of his life. He had to borrow money from another man in order to go to college and took out a Life Insurance policy payable to the other man until the debt was repaid. His schooling enabled him to succeed and, eventually, be elected President. He then took out another Life Insurance policy using New York Life Insurance Company as the insurer. The ad claims that he had only made the first payment when he was assassinated but one payment was enough. The year of this ad, 1935, was the Ninetieth Anniversary and the text claims that, including Garfield, there had been seven Presidents of the United States that had been insured by New York Life Insurance Company.
February 23, 1935
Saturday Evening Post
0
$9.00
View Insurance 32

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New York Life
Black and white 9" x 12" ad for their Family Insurance Plan. The ad has a picture of a family of six heading home from a shopping trip. In a scene that would be hard to believe in today's times this family of six is walking and are holding two paper bags of groceries along with one six-pack of pop. The headlines say "Announcing New York Life's pace-setting Family Insurance Plan", calling it "Life Insurance in an economical family-size package" and assuring you that it "Covers you, your wife, your children - all in just one policy with a low monthly premium". The ad has a chart that gives rates for different ages of the father and it talks about other features to consider. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 1957
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$7.50
View Insurance 22

New York Life
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Life Insurance to enable your family to be protected. There is a picture of a piggy bank with change being added to it and the image of a family of three seen through the sides. The headline warns that "If you're saving for your family's future...make sure you own enough life insurance now!" The text explains that your New York Life agent will be able to help you decide just how much is enough for your family. It mentions too that there are several different types available and your agent can steer you into which kind would be best for you.
April 11, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 47

New York Life
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about the need for Life Insurance. The picture shows the small hands of a young boy reaching up and gripping the larger fingers of his father and the headline tells us that "the call for security is strong but silent, you hear it through your heart". The text discusses what this small boy needs and what is important for his well-being and mentions the right man, your New York Life agent and how he can advise and serve you.
May 5, 1961
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Insurance 43

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New York Life
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for the New York Life Insurance Company. The ad has a photo of a Family Ledger with a bottle of red ink and a bottle of black ink waiting to be used. The ad headline asks "Where does your family stand financially?". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1965
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 4

Occidental Life of California
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for what they consider to be almost the best policies available. There is a picture of a man standing in his boxer shorts holding an armful of army ezpuipment including a rifle and the headline says that "There's one way to get a better insurance deal than ours." The text begins by talking about what Uncle Sam offers and at what price and admits that it is unbeatable because the government is footing part of the bill. It then talks about what is available for civilians and claims that Occidental Life of California has the best deal for them. It gives an example concerning a 32 year old man, reminds us that they have been selling insurance since 1931 and that they are the 9th largest life insurance company in the country.
August 19, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 41

Occidental Life of California
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Death Insurance. There is a picture of a hard-working housewife struggling to hang her clothes on a line placed past her fingertips as the headline reasons that "If you can't buy your wife a dryer, it's dumb to invest in life insurance. What you need is death insurance." The text goes into detail about this Death Insurance and mentions that it is less expensive than Life Insurance and that you can, at a later date, convert your Death Insurance to Life Insurance without a medical exam.
April 19, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 28

Prudential
Black and white 8 1/2" x 12" ad for their Life Insurance. The ad has a picture of a happy man with a policy from Prudential folded up in his coat pocket playing with his young son who looks like he wants to lick the policy. The ad headline claims this boy is "Safeguarded by daddy's Life Insurance" and there is a picture of the Rock of Gibraltar, just like always.
October 1939
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$9.00
View Insurance 37

Prudential
Black and white 9 1/2" x13 1/2" ad for their Life Insurance Policies. There is a drawing of a mother and father sitting in their living room looking at information about a Prudential Life Insurance policy as they consider their two children playing with their toys and the dog. The ad mentions "5 Important Provisions in Life Insurance Policies that you should know about". These include 1) the four different ways you can direct your insurance company to pay the benefits, 2) the Waiver of Premium benefit, 3) the four ways you can have your dividends credited, 4) the ways that you can elect to pay your premiums and 5) if you stop paying premiums do you have the right to get your money back.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 39

Prudential
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Life Insurance. The ad has a photo of a smiling young boy who holds the larger piece of a turkey wishbone in his hand while the young girl he was competing with is looking very disappointed as she looks at her smaller piece. The ad headline lets us know that "There's a better way to make wishes come true!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 13, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 8

Prudential
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a photo of a young man just out of the service sitting in his living room going through the items in his "Secure" box. The ad headline reminds you to "Keep your Service Insurance too!" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 21, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 1

Prudential
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Life Insurance. There is a picture of a young boy and girl sitting in the living room near the Christmas tree busily working on cutting out a card For Daddy with Love. The text talks about the various, standard gifts they have presented him with, some hand-made, because they feel confident that he will always protect him. It then gives all 'Daddys' another way to make that possible, life insurance with Prudential. You are urged to have a talk with your nearest Prudential agent to find out the many types of policies that are available.
December 16, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 46

Royal Globe
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the various types of Insurance that they offer in their Insurance Group. There is an amazing picture of the morning of April 16, 1947 in the harbor of Texas City when the freighter Grandcamp began a series of explosions that spread fire throughout the city streets. "Within hours, representatives of the Royal-Globe Insurance Group were at the scene expediting the payment of claims to hslp restore the homes and industry of this important port city". The text tells us how long the company has been in business, how many field offices it had and the number of agents, "all emmently qualified to write insurance for every type of risk".
June 11, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Insurance 33

State Farm
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for the need for insurance during these times of war. The ad has a photo of several men who are talking as they walk toward a policeman and has the title "Unwilling Saboteur". The ad tells the story of how "Jack", just like all other American workers, works long and hard. One night he happened to doze off as he was driving home. Now, without insurance his savings, and his life, are ruined and the war-effort has lost a good worker. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Insurance 9

State Farm
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for the State Farm Insurance Company. The headline reads "Do you avoid passing on hills and curves? It can help you...save up to 40% on your auto insurance". The picture in this ad shows a truck driving slowly up a steep hill, signs indicating that it is a steep hill, with several cars creeping along behind him. The ad indicates that "If you use good judgement like the motorist in this picture, you're probably a careful driver at all times. It should be easy for you to qualify for membership with State Farm Mutual - the "careful driver insurance company". It should be easy for you to save up to 40 per cent on the cost of your auto insurance". At the bottom of the ad is a nine-point check-list entitled "Can You Qualify".
July 5, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
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Insurance 59

Travelers
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Group packages for firms with 10 to 24 employees. The headline calls this "A New Employee Christmas Package" and has a picture of an older man handing information to a younger man who has a Christmas wreath hanging on the wall behind him. The text touches on what is available as far as options and contains a coupon to be sent in for more information.
December 1955
Fortune
1
$8.00
View Insurance 44

Travelers
Three color 10" x 14" ad for their affordable Life Insurance. There is a picture of a man coming toward his house after a day at work and he sees his wife and two children waiting for him at the window with smiles on their faces. The headline has him thinking "$51.75 a month means we'll keep our good life for good" and the text talks about why Jerry Darrow made this move and about some of the other moves he is going to make to to ensure the security of he and his family. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 27

Travelers
Three color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the insurance company that says that "Your home has been growing in more than population! (Have you figured its value lately?)". There is a picture of a father feeding his baby while his two other young children are laughing at what he is doing. The ad says "As your family has grown, the value of the house you live in has probably grown too. And while you've been adding youngsters, you've most likely been increasing your possessions as well - without keeping count. That's why, if you start figuring what your home and its contents are worth today, you'll be surprised at how much you really own - and how much you stand to lose. A fire or windstorm could destroy these things. A thief could steal many of them. Injury to a visitor, and a damage suit could take them away. With a new Travelers Package policy for homeowners, you can protect your house - and all that's in it - at it's cash value today. (Remember: if you're not fully insured, it's not enough)". Travelers handles all forms of personal and business insurance including Life, Accident, Group, Fire, Marine, Automobile, Casualty and Bonds.
April 8, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Insurance 58

Travelers
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Life Insurance. The ad has a series of drawings that are entitled "Charlie Dunn's fourfold blessing". The storyline has Charlie being told that his wife has given birth to triplets. Charlie is stunned because he had planned and saved for only one. An agent from Travelers just happened to be standing around the waiting room, briefcase in hand, and managed to calm Charlie down and sell him a policy at the same time. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 17, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 15

Travelers
Three color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that indicates that Life Insurance from Travelers is the best way to go. The picture has four children, and a dog, standing outside and working on being an orchestra. As they stand around somewhat playing their instruments the only one that has a happy outlook, a red umbrella over her head, is the young girl. The first sentence says "When I grow up"...what? and says that "Whatever she hopes to be, her chances are better beneath The Travelers umbrella of insurance protection". They claim that this is the sure way to make her college education a certainty. As a sign of the times you are told to "look in your Yellow Pages for the name of your Travelers man".
April 14, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Insurance 50

Travelers
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for your Homeowners Insurance as well as the other kinds they offer. There is a picture of two moving men who are delivering a piano to the home of a buyer. The truck is parked in the driveway and while one chubby mover is sitting on the bench smoking a cigar and playing the keys the other mover is leaning on the back and listening dreamily to the music being played. The ad headline says "Protect on delivery" and the text reminds you that as you add more items to what you possess don't forget to have your insurance renewed. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 18, 1961
Saturday Evening Post
0
$7.50
View Insurance 24

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Travelers
Three color 9 1/4" x 12 1/2" ad for their Health Insurance. The ad has a black and white photo of a man who has climbed to a high limb on a leafless tree to try and get down a cat who seems very happy just standing on the limb. Over this man's head is a Red Umbressa with a "T" and the ad headline asks the question "Would breaking a leg put you out on a limb?" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 9, 1962
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Insurance 12

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Travelers
Three color 10" x 13" ad for how and when you should look at increasing your insurance. The picture is of a home that is having enlargement done to it and the husband and wife are out there looking over plans. As they stand there deep in thought the red Travelers umbrella is perched above the two of them. The ad says that "When your house sprouts wings, call us. Adding a new wing? New appliances? New furniture? Put them under the Travelers umbrella of insurance protection". The ad says that, even if you are not adding onto your house, call your insurance man and find out if there is not some improvement in insurance.
April 24, 1962
Look magazine
1
$7.50
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Insurance 51

Travelers
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Life Insurance. There is a picture of two couples sitting in a living room for an evening get-together playing cards while a young boy with the Travelers Insurance Company over his head sits listening from the stairs. The headline asks "What's in the cards for your son? and the text talks about what you should be aware of if you were no longer around to support him. You are urged to contact the agent from Travelers to take care of all you insurance needs.
December 7, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 48

Travelers
Three color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for the concept of Life Insurance. The ad has a black and white photo of a mother trying to take care of her four children while she works in the kitchen. The photo has a red Travelers Umbrella over her head and the headline asks the question "Could your wife hold down a second full-time job?". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 28, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 7

Travelers
Three color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that says that Travelers can help you "Follow the fish to Florida for a week every winter when you quit working. How?" They answer that question by saying "With Travelers Money-Back Life Insurance. It guarantees you protection when you need it and independence when you want it". There is a picture of a 30 or 40 foot boat coasting in the ocean with a person or two fishing and you wonder if it is someone who is retired and has Travelers. The ad seems to imply that this person does have Travelers and they got that boat for $650 per week. The ad questions you by saying "Sound like the sort of thing you'd like to do every year when you stop working?" If so than you had better talk to your Travelers man now.
May 20, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
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Insurance 52

Travelers
Three color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Umbrella Plan concerning one company covering all of your needs for insurance. The ad has a picture of a man washing his car in front of his house while his wife brings their child out to play. There are various red umbrellas over the different parts of his life that Travelers is protecting such as his car, his life, liability for his house and other various needs. The ad headline says that by using Travelers you can "Now cover everything with just one check a month". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 18, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Insurance 23

Union Central Life Insurance Company of Cincinnati
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that indicates that this company is looking for people to work in their sales force. The ad tells a story of a man working at a manufacturing company which was having its workload reduced due to the war. This man was unsure how long his job would last so he began looking around for something else. He was recommended to this company and underwent capability test which led to a complete training program which has allowed him to become a successful salesman. The last picture shows a male hand mailing an envelope to the company and the caption urges people over 45 to give it a try.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Insurance 38

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