Camera Ads

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.

These ads are listed alphabetically by manufacturer and then chronologically with the oldest ad first.


HOME
PAGE
AD
PAGE
MAGAZINE
PAGE
HOW TO ORDER
PAGE
NEW LISTING
PAGE
 
e-mail Vic with questions

BRAND
AD DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
Agfa
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their Isoflash-Rapid Camera. The ad has a photo of a young lady holding the camera up with it's back opened so the pressure plate is visible. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 16, 1965
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 42

Aires
Black and white 5" x 10 1/2" ad that was for the Aires 35 Camera. This ad has a picture of this camera at the top of the ad with the words "Establishing New Heights of Precision And Value" under it. It then says that "Once in a great while a new camera appears on the market which is so outstanding it dwarfs all competition. It handles like a thoroughbred, produces results to satisfy the connoisseurs, is as easy to use as the "old reliable" box camera. The Aires 35, with 1/500 sec. MFX shutter, is just such an instrument. It whispers precision...you feel the silky sm-o-o-o-thness as you use it. A sharp crispness is apparent in the unbelievably brilliant "trimming" type single-window finder, and in the slightning fast f:1.9 6-element lens. And, the new Aires 35-IIIC also has BUILT-IN SELF TIMER and AUTOMATIC PARALLAX COMPENSATION. All this and other fine features make Aires the 35mm Standard For The Comparison. See it soon at your camera dealer". It has a price of $110.00 for the Aires 35 camera but it shows an Aires 35-IIIL camera for $99.50, an Aires Exposure Meter for $12.95 and an Aires Telephoto Lens for $59.95.
July 1958
Holiday
1
$7.50
View
Camera 148

Ansco
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their All-Weather Film. The ad has a picture of two happy male golfers filling out their scorecards under the headline "None but Ansco guarantees you crisp, clear snapshots With Any Camera...In Any Weather!". The ad talks about "any camera" but there is a small picture of their Automatic Reflex camera for which specifications are given and a price of $165.00. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 14, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 57

Ansco
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the "New Anscoflex Camera". The ad shows you how to "Take the Easy Way to better pictures. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 23, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 5

Ansco
Three color 10" x 13 1/2" ad with a headline that states that "It's a Great Year for Vacation Pictures" as long as you take them with Ansco All-Weather Pan Film. The picture at the top of the page shows two young women looking at, and laughing at, a handful of vacation pictures. The top line claims that this is the "First black-and-white snapshot film that pictures people and places at their best...always". It then says that "On vacation, you take so many different kinds of pictures on the same roll of film. People in shady gardems and on sunny beaches, sports pictures, scenic pictures, flash shots 'round a campfire'. They"ll all turn out beautifully...is you'll just take them on Ansco All-Weather Pan"". They picture, near the bottom of the page, a Anscoflex II camera for sale for $18.95. Sounds like a good deal to me.
June 11, 1956
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 121

Ansco
Full color 10" x 14" ad that tells you "It's a Great Year for Color Pictures". There is a picture at the top of the page of a mother and her two children standing on a railing looking out with glee. The ad says >u>"3-times faster, Anscochrome endows your color pictures with a life and warmth, a natural beauty new to color photography". The text describes that with Ansco film you can take a picture in less light, you can freeze action, you can "stop down" and give your backgrounds greater detail. They made film for 35mm, 120, 620, 828, 16mm movie and sheet sizes. In the bottom right side corner there is an Ansco 35mm Memar camera that was being sold for $39.95 with a carrying case for $6.95.
August 20, 1956
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 120

Ansco
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/4" ad that wants you to buy their Ansco Kodochrome Color Film. At the top of the ad are two photographs; the one on the left says "Super Anscochrome: sharp and clear" and the one on the right says "Conventional film: blurred - or dark". The difference in the two photos is more than just slight, the one on the right you can barely tell what it is about. Below this the headline reads "'Twin Camera' Test proves you can get action pictures like this only with Super Anscochrome". The ad then says that "Super Anscochrome - Film speed 100 - is the fastest, most sensitive color film ever created. Result? Super Anscochrome lets you shoot pictures no one has ever caught in color before. You can now take color pictures just by the available light in a room, for instance. Or in fog or rain. Or at dawn or dusk. And without time exposure, tripod or extra lighting. You can freeze fast action, too - with every movement sharp, every color clear. Color quality? Magnificent! And the "depth" and detail of the slides will thrill you. No wonder Super Anscochrome, world's fastest color film, is also the world's fastest-growing film - with amateurs and pros, alike. Available in 35mm or 120 sizes".
July 1958
Holiday
1
$7.50
View
Camera 145

Argus
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Candid Cameras. The ad has a picture of a family of three patiently waiting to board an airplane as the headline promises that "Argus makes the World's Fair yours forever!". There are five pictures supposedly taken with one of these cameras of the 1939 new York World's Fair and the captions describe the capabilities of these cameras to take different kinds of shots. There is a picture of the Model A camera with a price of $10 with specifications listed underneath. The text mentions that there were four different models but only mentions the Model A and the Argus C2 which sold for $25 with a few of the specifications listed.
May 22, 1939
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 107

Argus
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for many of the Argus Products to be considered as Christmas Gifts in 1956. Starting from the top left they show the Argus C3 35mm camera with a good description of its capabilities and a price of $69.50. Next they show the Argus 75 which they call the "world's easiest camera to use" at a price of $15.95. Next is the Argus C4 which is another 35mm camera for $99.50 followed by the Argus 200 watt projector for $49.50. It shows too the Argus 75 Gift Package which has just about everything your budding photographer will need to get started and the Argus 40 Gift Kit for the slightly more advanced photographer followed by the New Argus C3 Telephoto Lens for $69.50.
December 1, 1952
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 91

Argus
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their C-3 cameras and the options available. Over a picture of this camera with a flash are the words "Here's proof that luxuries needn't be expensive!" and text that gives proof. There are pictures of two lenses, the C-3 Telephoto Lens and the C-3 Wide-Angle Lens which are priced at $49.50 each.
March 19, 1956
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View
Camera 74

Argus
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their C-3 Camera, Case & Flash. The ad has a picture of this complete unit and the headline surprisingly informs us that "It takes surprisingly little money to own the world's No. 1 color slide camera!". The ad claims that this combo would cost you only $66.50 and also gives prices and information for the C-3 Sandmar Telephoto Lens ($49.50), the C-3 Sandmar Wide-angle Lens ($$9.50) and the New Variable Power Viewfinder ($14.50). The text gives a general overview of this camera. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 18, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 77

Argus
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the Argus C-3. The ad shows you how to "Graduate to color slides without a single lesson". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 5, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 12

Argus
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their Slide Projectors. The ad has several pictures of their Argus 300, one with the family sitting comfortably on the couch while the the oldest son flips from slide to slide with the remote control that was available. The ad says "Only $85.00" while the text mentions that "Argus projector prices start at $39.50". The text talks about features of the remote and mentions the 36-slide aluminum magazine. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 85

Argus
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that is just about the same as the one dated February 18, 1957 except in this one the Slide Projector is priced at $79.50. It says "Now - show your color slides from anywhere in the room!" and it advertises the "New Argus Remote Control Slide Projector". Most of the printed words are the same in each ad.
April 8, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 124

Argus
Black and white 7 1/4" x 11" ad that is for their Argus C-44 Cameras. The ad headline says that "Here is the New Argus C-44...its ability goes far beyond its price". There is a photo of the camera and a few accessories and the text says that "The talented new Argus C-44 with rare-earth Cintagon f:2.8 lens and new variable-power turret viewfinder attached. Surrounding it are its accessory 100mm Telephoto and 35mm Wide-Angle lenses". At the left side it says that "The new Argus C-44 is indeed an astonishing camera - it fairly bristles with features you look hopefully for in other cameras costing hundreds of dollars more." There is a lot of more information here in this ad and, at the bottom of the ad, it has a list of C-44 Accessories.
July 1958
Holiday
1
$7.50
View
Camera 144

Argus
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their C-3 Cameras. There is a picture of a lady's hand holding one of these cameras between her thumb and forefinger with the headline calling it the "World's most popular color-slide camera" and saying "The original Argus C-3 now only $39.95". The text calls it "camera that made color slides popular" and gives a short list of features on this camera. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 8, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 79

Bell & Howell
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Filmo Motion Picture Cameras and Projectors. This wartime ad has a picture of a Naval Officer standing on the deck of a ship that is being attacked by enemy planes. In the heat of the battle he is busy filming an explosion taking place on a nearby ship as planes come his way and bullets are throwing up plumes of water in a path beating its way toward him. The ad headline says "Comrades in Arms on every front" and the text talks about how important these films of actual fighting have become in the efforts to train new soldiers.
June 1943
National Geographic
0
$8.00
View
Camera 67

Temporarily
Sold Out

Bell & Howell Filmo
Full color 10" x 13" ad that shows the reader what to use "For the FINEST personal movies". Shown is a photo of the Filmo Auto Load. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 14, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 19

Bell & Howell
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 1/2" ad for their Filmo movie Cameras. There is a picture of two cameras, the Filmo Auto-8 Camera, 8mm and the Filmo Sportster 8mm Camera, sitting on a table waiting for the readers to buy them. The ad headline assures you that you can "Get the Finest Color Movies this sure way" and the text gives a short description of the quality and assurance you will feel while using them and a short list of some of the features built into each camera.
September 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View
Camera 66

Bell & Howell
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 1/2" ad for some of their Filmo cameras. The ad headline promises that "Filmos give the Hollywood Touch to your personal Color Movies" and has pictures of the Filmo Companion Camera and the Filmo Master Projector. The ad text talks about the quality built into these products by the same craftsman that make cameras for the people in Hollywood and there are specific descriptions of these two units and a price given of $77 for the Filmo Companion Camera.
November 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View
Camera 65

Bolex
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/47" ad for their Movie Cameras. The ad headline says "3d or 2d. Movies for Christmas? Bolex offers both" and has pictures to back the claim. At the top is a picture of a man looking at the Bolex Stereo System for three-dimensional movies which is priced at $397.50. At the bottom of the ad is a picture of a lady hanging a wreath next to a Bolex H-16 DeLuxe camera which has a description and a price mentioned of $496.50.
November 1953
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View
Camera 68

Bolex
Black and white 7 3/4" X 11" ad that is for their Bolex H Series of movie cameras. This ad starts off with the words "Studio in a Camera" showing a scene inside of a camera. It then says "The Superb Bolex H Series. Settings and features for all professional effects". It then says "All in one camera - the settings and features you need for sports, advanced amateur, laboratory and commercial movies. This Studio-in-a-Camera gives you instant choice of standard, wide angle and telephoto shots with 3-lens turret...speeds from 8 to 64 fps, the widest selection made...hand-winding backward and forward for lap dissolves...continuous run lock...time exposure...single frame controls...footage and frame counters...constant film speeds with automatic cut-off on rundown to avoid spoiled footage". It then says that it has "3 Models including Bolex H-16 Leader". Continuing on it says "The professionally equipped Leader is the most precise 16mm mechanism that Swiss craftsmanship can provide. The H-16 Leader gives you foolproof through-the-lens focusing...parallax-corrected viewfinder. Lenses are famed Kern-Paillard, made especially for Bolex, with up to 10 elements for movie brilliance. Prices for the Leader start at $229.50. Series include the H-16 (16mm) Reflex for direct through-the-lens viewing while shooting, from $419.50; and the H-8, a special 8mm model that combines all professional features with a remarkable 100-foot 8mm film load, from $229.50".
May 1958
Holiday
1
$8.00
View
Camera 142

Bolex
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Zoom Reflex 8 Movie Camera. The ad has a picture of a young baby staring straight into the camera lens with a forefinger stuck in it's mouth and the headline assures you that "Bolex wouldn't have missed this for anything". The ad mentions some of the features of this camera, mentions that the price starts at less than $200 and also mentions the Bolex 18-5 Projector. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 24-31, 1963
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View
Camera 55

Canon
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Canonet QL17 Automatic. The ad has a large photo of the camera and a smaller photo that show four different versions. The ad headline describes "Canonet QL17. As automatic at midnight as it is at noon." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 9, 1971
Life magazine
1
$7.00
View
Camera 36

Canon
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad designed to advertise the fact that they have been awarded the title of The Official 35mm Camera of the 1980 Olympic Winter Games. The ad contains eight photos of Winter Olympians, past and present, and four of their cameras lined up for viewing. The ad headline reminds us that "Only the best go to the Olympics". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 1979
Life magazine
0
$7.00
View
Camera 43

Temporarily
Sold Out

Fotron
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their New Color Camera. The ad has a picture of this item along with several comments from users of this camera. The ad gives a list of the functions of this camera that are performed automatically and includes a coupon to mail in and get a free book. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 3, 1966
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View
Camera 49

Fotron
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for "The amazing Fotron color camera". Includes a separate coupon to mail in for free information. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 8, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 3

General Electric
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 1/2" ad for their G-E Mascot Exposure Meter. The top of the ad has a pair of pictures of the same scene. The left picture is a dark Before picture that is incorrectly exposed. The right picture is properly lit, is labeled After and was taken after using the G-E Mascot to identify the proper exposure needed. There are several pictures of the unit, both in the hand of the user and close enough so that the meter on the unit can be seen. The text talks about how easy it is to use and gives a price of $15.95.
July 1955
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View
Camera 63

General Electric
Black and white 10" x 14" ad fpr their PowerMite Flash. The ad has a picture of a man holding his camera with a huge smile on his face under the headline assuring us that "This flash picture stuff is a cinch". There are three smaller pictures showing how easy it will be to take indoor shots of the family, showing samples of the "sharper pictures" that will come your way and to encourage you to "Insist on G-E PowerMite (bulbs)". The text talks about the Controlled Light this unit will give you and claims that it will fit any flash holder. For older cameras not equipped for PowerMite they had an adapter available for about 22 cents. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 87

Graflex
Black and white 5 1/2" x 13" ad for the New Pacemaker Speed Graphic. The ad encourages you to "Get the Camera Press Photographers use". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 3, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 6

Graflex
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Graphic 35 camera. There is a close-up picture of this camera and a picture of a lady using one to take a picture. The ad headline calls it the "First camera with Push-Button Focusing!" and the text describes more of the features of this camera which is advertised as costing $89.50 as an outfit with Leather Carrying Case and Flash.
April 1955
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View
Camera 70

Graflex
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Graphic 35 cameras. There is a picture of a couple outside of a ski lodge and the man is pointing at the front of the camera which the woman has hanging from her neck. There is a picture of this camera with a description of its features with mention of a price of $59.50 for the camera only and $74.50 for the complete outfit. There is also a picture of the Constellation 35mm Slide Projector with a short description and a price mentioned of $89.50.
March 1958
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View
Camera 69

Hasselblad
Black and white 5" x 10 1/4" ad for the Hasselblad Camera that is 15 Cameras in One. The ad says that "The Hasselblad idea...it's 15 cameras in one". It says that "The famous Swedish 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 Single Lens Reflex with interchangeable lenses and film magazines. Sets up for virtually every shot known to photography in 2 seconds". Then it shows the "New Model - the 500 C". This "Now includes SynchroCompur shutter and automatic diaphragm in every lens, with coupled EVS system. Diaphragms close automatically to preset openings when you shoot. Precision Zeiss Lenses include Standard Planar 80mm F:2.8 Distagon Wide Angle 60mm F:5.6 Long Focal Length 150mm F:4.0, and Sonnar Telephoto 250mm F:5.6". Then, lastly, it says that they have "Interchangeable Film Backs" which "enable you to switch from black and white to color at will, without finishing roll first. Cut film holder and superslide magazine (2 1/4 x 1 5/8) also available. The Hasselblad with Standard 80mm Zeiss Planar Lens is priced at $480.50. Write today for literature and name of a dealer nearest you".
July 1958
Holiday
1
$7.50
View
Camera 146

Honeywell
Full color 7 3/4" x 11" ad for the Honeywell Pentax Camera. The ad has a photo of this camera sitting at the top of the ad and the headline under it says that "Five years ago we brought you a camera that takes the guesswork out of fine photography. You made Honeywell Pentax a classic". The text continues by saying that "Only continuing acceptance by discriminating users can make a product a classic. Most products - even those in the higher price ranges - depend on "cosmetic" changes to maintain appeal. How many fine watches, automobiles - or cameras - can you name that are so inherently superior they maintain leadership with essentially their original design. The Honeywell Spotmatic that "took the guesswork out of fine photography" when it was introduced five years ago, is still the world's best-selling fine camera. And this classic hasn't rested on it's laurels. Inside, the Spotmatic has been improved and refined. A total of more than 140 modifications have been made since its introduction. These subtle, but significant, changes provide even greater perfection and satisfaction in use". Other headlines in this ad are "The "classics" have one thing in common: Simplicity", "Perfect exposure every time", "You can feel - even hear - the difference" and "Honeywell Pentax isn't just a fine camera - it's a system of fine photography".
April 1970
Playboy
1
$7.00
View
Camera 141

Honeywell
Full color 8" x 11" ad for their Pentax Spotmatic. There is a picture of this camera placed on a white surface with the caption calling it the "World's Best Selling 35mm Camera" and having the "World's Most Accurate Metering System". The headline simply says that "There is no finer camera made..." and the text tries to give enough information to make that believeable. It talks about the Feel of a Pentax Spotmatic and urges you to begin buying some of the 28 perfectly matched Takumar lenses that were available. It mentions that this camera could be yours for $309.50 and other models with fantastic features could be had for up to $4,950. The description ends by urging you to "Will it to your favorite grandkid" since it will never wear out.
April 1971
Playboy
1
$7.00
View
Camera 106

Keystone
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their B-27 Capri Movie Camera and their K-100 8mm Projector. There is a picture of a backyard barbecue where a man is cooking hot dogs and a few hamburgers as a lady films this once-in-a-lifetime action. To make the action more dramatic there are two children standing behind him in a bored manner and a catanonic lady holding a baby and sitting in a wood chair. Set up in this scene too is a movie screen and the movie projector mentioned so that in case they happen to forget the fun they are having they can relive it over and over again. The headline says "for a holiday at home...Give a Keystone outdoor movie party" and the text discusses the ease with which these items can be operated. The ad does give more information on these two items and mentions a price of $99.95 for the projector and $109.90 for the camera shown.
June 23, 1958
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 93

Kodak
Black and white 6" x 9 1/2" ad for their pocket sized 2C Kodak Jr.. The ad contains a drawing of this camera and states that it takes pictures that are 2 7/8 x 4 7/8. The text explains that it takes "pictures of the somewhat elongated post card shape - but just a trifle smaller" and that it is Autographic because "all the folding Kodaks now are". The prices given in the ad show the basic camera costing $12.00 with a camera with Rapid Rectilinear lens costing $14.00 and one with the "Kodak Anastigmat lens f.7.7". This ad has a few small stains visible in the bottom of the scanned view.
unknown
The Review of Reviews
1
$9.00
View
Camera 72

Kodak
Black and white 4 3/4" x 14 1/2" ad for "The Witchery of Kodakery". The ad has a photo of a lady working on developing a roll of film. This ad is taller than my scanner bed so the top and bottom will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 1911
Ladies Home Journal
0
$9.00
View
Camera 35

Temporarily
Sold Out

Kodak
Black and white 9 1/4" x 12 1/4" ad that tries to convince you that you shouldn't take a vacation without bringing a Kodak camera on it because "Kodak brings your vacation back". There is a picture of a desolate yet scenic beach where one woman is leaning against a tree and posing with her hand to her head while another woman tries to focus the camera and take a picture of her friend. The text says that you will remember "All the fun you've had - all the friends you've made - your vacation story told in split seconds, with a Kodak". It offers "Autographic Kodaks $6.50 up At your dealer's".
August 1, 1922
Vogue
1
$9.00
View
Camera 110

Kodak
Full color 8 3/4" x 12" ad for their Cine-Kodak Model K Movie Camera. The headline calls it "A Wonderful New Movie Camera that takes Black and White, Kodacolor and Telephoto movies" and claims that it "Weighs only 3 lbs 11 1/2 ozs". There is a picture of a woman of the time period staring intently through the aiming devices as she holds the movie camera up to her face so that her face is partially hidden but the camera can be clearly seen. There are smaller pictures that demonstrate the Interchangeable Lenses, its ability to film at Half Speed, how it can be used For Distance - Telephoto Effect and that it Takes Movies in Full Color. The text goes into more details about these features mentioning the f.3.5 standard lens, the f.1.9 for Kodacolor and the f.4.5 for long focus, describing the physical aspects of this unit and mentioning a price of $110 for the Model K with f.3.5 lens and $150 with the f.1.9 lens and case.
September 1930
The American Home
1
$9.00
View
Camera 100

Kodak
Black and white 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Cine-Kodak Eight movie camera. The ad has a picture of a couple sitting in the Rumble Seat of a car of that period looking at a Cine-Kodak Eight that the man holds in his hands. The woman comments "My, but it's tiny...it looks like a toy" and the man proudly responds "Far from it...look at the way it's made...and wait till you see the movies". There is another smaller picture of two ladies talking about a picture the one lady is holding in her hand and another picture of an elderly couple watching movies of themselves. The text talks about movies being made for 10 cents a shot and the price of the camera being $34.50.
April 1934
National Geographic
1
$8.50
View
Camera 71

Kodak
Black and white 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Cine-Kodak Eight movie camera. There is a picture of two men and a woman sitting in a darkened room watching movies of the vacation of one of them. The caption has one of them saying that "Our vacation movies actually cost less than we spent for tips" and the scene being viewed is a mountainous area where an upright bear is approaching a tree from behind where a woman is seeking protection while holding out something (Please don't feed the bears?) in her hand. Noting the uneven number of men and women in the picture I have to guess that the woman on the screen is the desceased wife of one of the men. The text mentions a price to purchase this item of $34.50.
June 1934
National Geographic
1
$8.50
View
Camera 73

Kodak
Black and white 7 1/4" x 11 1/4" ad for their Verichrome Film. The ad has a picture of a mother and her daughter standing by the mailbox having just opened an envelope filled with pictures. As they gaze with wonder at the person in the snapshots the headline reminds all of us that "When he's bigger you don't know what these snapshots will mean". There is another reminder that "The pictures you will want Tomorrow...you must take Today".
July 1934
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.50
View
Camera 54

Kodak
Black and white 9" x 12 1/2" ad for their Home Movie Cameras, Magazine Cine-Kodak and Cine-Kodak "K". The ad has a picture of a baby in diapers stealthily approaching a wary cat from behind and the headline asks "Could anything but a movie camera do him justice?". I have a feeling that the "Bad Hair Day" this child is having will be nothing compared with the wrong turn his or her day will take once contact is made with the cat. The text describes how a dynamo of energy that a young child is will never be captured with a set of still pictures. The ad has a picture that shows both of the movie cameras mentioned in the ad and gives information about their capabilities and mentions prices of $112.50 for the Cine-Kodak "K" and $137.50 for the Magazine Cine-Kodak. The ad talks about how the magazine will load in 3 seconds and mentions that both of these cameras were 16 mm.
April 15, 1936
Vogue
1
$8.50
View
Camera 111
/ Kids

Kodak
Black and white 7 3/4" x 11 1/2" ad for their Verichrome Film. The ad has a snapshot of a young baby lying down with a bottle of milk in his mouth. The headline, under the picture, says "Your baby - you'll never forget how sweet she is...(that's what you think)". The ad also has a picture of the Presidential matriarch Sara Delano Roosevelt next to a testimonial she is giving about the value of snapshots.
July 1937
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$8.50
View
Camera 53
/ Kids

Kodak
Black and white 7 3/4" x 11" ad for the "Cine-Kodak Eight" movie camera. This item will Make marvelous movie at everybody's price". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 1939
Redbook
1
$8.50
View
Camera 11

Kodak
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a photo of a Cine-Kodak Eight wrapped in a christmas bow and a price tag for $29.50. The ad headline claims that "This Christmas almost any family can start a movie record". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 4, 1939
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View
Camera 27

Kodak
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the fact that giving a Cine-Kodak Eight Movie Camera would make a great Christmas gift this year. There is a picture of a Model 20 camera with a light-colored ribbon wrapped around it and tied into a bow with the headline urging you to "Make it the BIG gift this Christmas". The text gives some relative costs for using this item talking about getting a "complete movie screne for a dime or less" and explaining that "a scene runs as long on your screen as the average newsreel shot". It mentions the general price of a roll of black and white film and reminds you that this film does NOT have to be developed before you show it back. It also mentions that beside the Model 20 shown in this ad Kodak also made a Magazine Cine-Kodak Eight for $97.50.
December 16, 1940
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 108

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the V---Mail that Kodak created and is now used by several different countries to minimize the weight of the thousands of letters sent back and forth from families to soldiers. With this system letters are written and photographed on Kodak microfilm. The microfilm is then shipped, containing thousands of letters, to its general destination where it is changed back to a paper letter and delivered to the intended person. Kodak along with Pan American Airways and British Overseas Airways formed a company called Airgraphs, Ltd. and have developed the transportation part of the system. This system has reduced the weight of mail by about 100 times.
October 26, 1942
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 113
/ Wartime

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for some of their wartime contributations. The ad has a drawing of a duck in flight with marks for bullets going behind it and the headline asks "What if the duck could shoot back!". The ad text talks about the Cine-Kodak Film and Magazine that was used to train our aerial gunners for battle. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Wartime 22
/ Kodak

Kodak
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their K-24 Aircraft Camera which, as explained in the ad, played a big part in reconnaissance during World War II. The ad has a picture of a bombandier and a gunner sitting together at their stations in a bomber. The caption explains that each time bombs were dropped the K-24 Kodak Camera would electronically take pictures, The text gives some specific details about its use in bombers and in reconnaissance planes and explains how, out of necessity, it was designed to "run its own show".
April 17, 1944
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View
Camera 109
/ Wartime

Temporarily
Sold Out

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the Kodak 35. This is a wartime ad and it talks about how invaluable the camera being built for the U.S. Signal Corps is. And how "you can look forward to it as one of your 'after the war' experiences". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 8, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 13
/ Wartime

Kodak
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad that promises you "Marvelous movies - first time you shoot" when you use the wonderful Cine-Kodak Cameras. They have the Cine-Kodak Magazine Eight in this ad and it says that it "makes full-color Kodachrome movies as simple as snapshots. Film comes in magazines; exposure guide "dials" the lens setting; fast, Lumenized f/1.9 lens takes wonderful movies indoors and out - slow motion shots, too!". There are five example-shots taken with this camera. "You'll want to learn how amazingly easy and economical home movies have become today. One low-cost roll or magazine of film will capture a whole weekend! Ask your dealer for the free booklet, "Home Movies Cine-Kodak Way". At the bottom of this ad it shows film, a Cine-Kodak Eight-25 Camera, a Kodascope Eight-33 Projector and a Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 Camera.
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 140

Kodak
Black and white 6" x 9" ad for their Precision Enlarger. The picture under the headline "Magnificent Enlarging Plus" shows both the A Assembly and the B Assembly together. The text under this picture gives a beginning explanation on how to use this product and the pictures on the right side of the ad indicate you can also use this product for Copying and Slide-Making, as an Independent Camera, for Close-Up Photography, for Photo Micrography and for Cine-Titling
February 1949
Popular Science
1
$8.00
View
Camera 104

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that advertises their Kodak Kodachrome Film. This ad shows a family watching a movie of their little girl growing up as she is taking a bath on the screen. The headline says that "Users of Kodak Flash Bantam Camera, Kodak 35 Camera or any other "miniature" with f/63 lens or better are offered this Double Reward for Kodachrome Film". The captions on the pictures here say "brilliant screen projection" and "gorgeous Kodachrome Prints". The text says that you can "Beg, borrow or buy a miniature camera and get ready to enjoy one of photography's most exciting experiences: Kodachrome projection and Kodachrome prints. The cameras and projectors described below give you true quality at sensible prices. Examine them critically at your Kodak dealers: Kodak Flash Bantam f/4.5 Camera - Palm-size miniature, big in ability. Kodak 35 Camera with range finder - Lamenized f/3.5 lens, 5-speeds to 1/200. Kodaslide Projector, Model 1A - PJrojects big, brilliant images of your color slides on a home screen. Kodaslide Table Viewer - An ingenious new viewer that holds 30 to 75 color slides".
February 1949
Holiday magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 138

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Kodak Film. The ad has a large, colorful photo of a young lady sitting on the edge of a swimming pool in her yellow two-piece bathing suit with dark polka dots. There is an older couple at the end of the pool with a camera taking pictures of this warm scene. The ad headline claims that "It's always summer in snapshots". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 15, 1949
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 41

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad for Christmas shoppers for the year 1949. This ad shows six different models and gives descriptions and prices. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 12, 1949
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 4

Kodak
Full color 13 1/2" x 14" ad for their Film, such an important part to every camera.There is a picture of a Christmas morning where the mother is happily taking a picture of her young son standing by the fireplace with his hand on his stocking while dad and his sister stand watching with smiles on their faces, dad with joy and the sister because she already has her stocking in her hand. The caption says "The look of a child on Christmas is more precious than any gift - keep it!" and the headline says that "Snapshots remember - when you forget". Pictured in the ad are a box each of the Kodacolor and the Verichrome and the reminder to have "two or three extra rolls of Kodak film on hand".
1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 98

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad for Kodak film. The colorful ad shows a daughter straightening her father's tie before she takes his picture and has the headline that "Your snapshots say it best". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 8, 1951
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View
Camera 1

Temporarily
Sold Out

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their Movie Cameras. The ad features a series of photos that shows a little girl being bathed, powdered, dressed and fed birthday cake and another photo that shows the parents watching this film with the little girl. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 22, 1951
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View
Camera 39
/ Kids

Temporarily
Sold Out

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their Brownie Movie Camera. There is a picture of a smiling man in a suit aiming his camera as, in several places, the price of $39.75 is displayed. The text urges you to "Bring back the most exciting 'travelog' on any screen...color movies of your vacation". The text gives some descriptions of this unit, with film roll prices, before showing the Brownie Movie Projector for $62.50 and the Brownie Movie Screen for only $4.50. At the bottom of the ad is a coupon that will get a free booklet, Let's Make Movies, sent to your door.
July 27, 1953
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 105

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their versatile cameras. The ad gives descriptions and prices for the Pony 135 camera Model B, Brownie Hawkeye and the Duaflex III camera with the Kodet Lens. The ad headline mentions "Black and white snapshots, Color snapshots, Flash snapshots" and claims that "You get all 3 with these Kodak cameras". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 30, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 46

Kodak
Three color 5 3/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their Stereo Camera. There is a picture of one of these cameras and another of one of the two different viewers that were available. The ad headline says "At last - the thrill of fine stereo at a moderate price. New Kodak Stereo Camera only $84.50". The text explains that the battery operated viewer was available for $12.75 and the 110 volt model was $23.75.
January 1955
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View
Camera 61

Kodak Pony Camera
Full color 10" x 13" ad that lets you know that "This is the camera that gets you started in color slides". The ad features a view of the Kodak Pony 135 Camera Model B as well as several different ways you can view the slides taken with this camera. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 9, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 21

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Brownie Movie Camera. The ad has a picture of a little girl standing on a swing as it moves under a tree limb. The ad headline claims "Easy as snapshots...thrilling home movies with this inexpensive camera" and mentions the price of $37.50 for the camera and $3.75 for a roll of film. The text claims this unit is as easy to use as a snapshot camera because all you have to do is aim and press the button. The ad also shows the Brownie Movie Projector and gives a description while mentioning the price of $62.
August 15, 1955
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View
Camera 50

Temporarily
Sold
Out

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that tells you that "You save more of Christmas in movies" when you are equipped with Kodak Equipment. The ad says that "Only in home movies can you hope to capture all the color and motion of your family good times. Kodak's 8mm equipment offers you snapshot ease and economy in movie making. Camera prices start at only $37.50. Ask your Kodak dealer about small down payments and easy terms". There are six specials listed in this ad. First, there is a Brownie Movie Camera, f/2.7, only with faster f/1.9 lens, $46.75. Then there is a Brownie Movie Camera, Turret f/1.9, $79.50. Then they show a Cine-Kodak Medallion 8 Camera, $144.50. Then we have a "Complete movie outfit for under $100" with a Brownie Movie Outfit, $99.50 and a Low-price "starter" movie kit" that is a Brownie Movie Camera Kit, F/2.7, $49.95 or with f/1.9 camera, $59.20. And the last item shown is a Cine-Kodak Showtime 8 Projector, $115.
December 5, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 128

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Brownie Movie Camera. The ad has a picture of a man at the beach holding one of these cameras to his face as he faces away from the ocean. The ad headline asks "Home movies expensive? No sir! Kodak now brings you a movie camera for only $29.95!". The text talks about how easy and inexpensive it is to use this camera and how much fun it is to get movies instead of still snapshots. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 18, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 76

Kodak
Full color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their palm-size Medallion 8 Movie Camera. The ad has a picture of a couple leaning against a car parked at a dock that is filled with sailboats. A lady wearing green gloves is holding one of these cameras in the foreground of the picture with the headline saying "Now...presenting the easiest-to-use home movie camera Kodak ever made! Only $99.50". There is a smaller picture of this camera with a 3-lens turret which could be bought for $149.50 complete.
June 1957
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View
Camera 62

Kodak
Full color 6 1/2" x 9 3/4" ad for their Signet 40 camera. There is a picture of one of these cameras on a table with a ships bell and some navigational equipment while the headline claims that the "New Kodak Signet 40 camera gives you clear sailing to glorious color slides!". The text gives some of the specifications for the camera and mentions a price of $69.
July 1957
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View
Camera 60

Kodak
Full color 9" x 12" ad for the Brownie Starflex Camera. The ad has a picture of a father by the back steps of his house cooking some undersize hamburgers on his barbecue while his two kids play with their dog. The ad headline says "Come and get it - for your snapshot diary" and the price mentioned in the ad is $9.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 1957
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$7.50
View
Camera 59

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that brings attention to the Kodak Cavalcade Projector. This ad says that the "New Kodak Cavalcade Projector changes slides by itself!" and, looking at the photograph of the man and his wife viewing the scenes, one would have to assume that it was so. The ad says that "You turn it on...it does the rest! New, superbly automatic projector gives beautiful, big-as-life color slide shows!". So you can "Sit back and relax. The brilliant new projector treats you like a guest. The Kodak Cavalcade Projector changes slides all by itself! Even if you leave the room, the show goes on. Slides continue to change - automatically! The Cavalcade offers three ways for semi-automatic changing, too - by remote control, pushbutton or control wheel. Your slides keep in constant focus no matter how many you show. The Cavalcade has a sharp f/2.8 lens - plus 300 or 500-watt illumination at the flick of a switch. Ask your dealer to demonstrate the new Kodak Cavalcade Projector. With preview screen, self-cover, remote-control cord, built-in screen pointer, $149.50 or $15 down". This ad has more information on the individual features further on in this ad>
May 1958
Holiday
1
$7.50
View
Camera 143

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that tells us all about the Kodak Retina Reflex Camera. At the top of the ad there is a picture that shows this camera sitting on a table with photographs and brochures and a view of a building on the river. The headline says the "Master of every picture situation...the new Kodak Retina Reflex Camera". It then says "...has professional full-area ground-glass focusing plus clear split-image rangefinding. You'll wear this brilliant new camera proudly...anywhere. If you are one of the fortunate people who buys a new Kodak Retina Reflex Camera this year, you will gain more than a supremely fine picture-taking instrument. You will have the satisfaction of choosing a classic - at its introduction. You will own a personal share in the world-renowned Retina tradition. This is the finest of all the modern 35mm pentaprism reflexes - built to make you the master of every picture situation. Its photoelectric exposure meter is ultrasensitive. Automatic diaphragm closes down to pre-set aperture when shutter is tripped, with all lenses. Shutter speeds, 1 to 1/500 second, flash-synchronized. Interchangeable lens compartments are wide-angle 35mm Curtar f/4 $77.50, telephoto 80mm Longar f/4 $80.00. No auxillary finder needed".
July 1958
Holiday
1
$8.00
View
Camera 147

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the Kodak line. The ad is a two page ad and it shows cameras, movie and slide projectors and movie cameras. The ad was the center pages from a National Geographic and does have the holes where the staples went through.
December 1958
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View
Camera 7

Kodak
Full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad to show all of the products available to give as Christmas gifts for 1958. Shown are ten different products with descriptions and prices. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 8, 1958
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 22

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their Signet 80 camera. The ad has a photo of the camera and a variety of equipment on a table overlooking the Indianapolis "500" race. The ad headline calls this "an expert's camera that does everything so easily!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 1959
Esquire
1
$7.50
View
Camera 47

Kodak A full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad for Kodacolor film. This ad contains pictures of Mickey Mantle, his wife and sons and the whole family together with the captions providing information about the subjects. Mickey is holding an unidentified camera and leaning on the back of a chair claiming that "You don't need any practice to take Kodacoler snapshots like these!". The text claims that the family photos shown in this ad were all taken by Mickey who claims that "I'm no photographer". May 12, 1959
Look magazine
&
May 25, 1959
Life magazine
2
$8.00 View
Celeb Male 7
/ Kodak

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad with a picture of Ed Sullivan holding a Brownie Flash 20. The ad pictures several other Kodak cameras with their prices. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 26, 1959
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 2

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for what you can do with your Kodak Pony II Camera. There is a large picture of a Sunday afternoon after church where a family with their two kids are sharing their vacation pictures with another couple who didn't realize what they were getting into. The little boy wearing a striped sports coat has spread his hands to show the visiting lady just how big the fish he caught was while, behind him, the picture has flashed on the screen showing the actual size of his 'catch'. The ad headline says "Whale of a show! Wait'll you see your vacation big as life...in Kodak color slides!" and the smaller pictures below show the Pony II Camera ($29.50), the Kodachrome Film and the Kodak 300 Projector ($64.50). This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 8, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 78

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad from the Eastman Kodak Company that says "Now! Brownie Camera with Electric Eye!". The ad shows several photos on the left and a few more on the right and, in the center, it shows a view of this interesting camera. The ad says that the "New Brownie Starmatic gives you good, clear pictures on bright days, cloudy days, in sun or shade...automatically! The electric eye makes you right every time!". It then says that the "Now Kodak brings you a Brownie Camera that's not only easy - it's automatic!. It takes both beautiful snapshots and sparkling color slides. All that you do is aim and shoot! Shoot in the sun, shoot in the shade - even indoors by a window! The electric eye measures the light, and sets the lens for picture-perfect results every time! And the lens is always in focus - even as close-up as 4 feet - so you get 12 sharp pictures on every roll of film. See this great new camera demonstrated at your Kodak dealer's now. It's yours for as little as $3.50 down". It shows a full price of $34.50 for this camera.
June 29, 1959
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 127

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for a choice of all the Kodak Cameras that were available that year. The picture at the top of the ad shows Christmas morning in a house where a Mother and a Father are sitting there watching their two children opening their presents and enjoying Christmas. The headline says that "Kodak suggests a "Give and Take" Christmas!". There are two sections of information here, the one on the left is labeled "Give Kodak gifts for a happy Christmas" and the one on the right is labeled "Take pictures to save and share the fun". Then it shows the six camera groups they were selling. First was the Brownie Starflash Camera for $10.35, then the Brownie Reflex 20 Camera for $22.95, the Brownie Starmatic Cameras for $45.95, the Kodak Pony II Camera for $42.95, the Kodak Automatic 35 Camera for $84.50, the Compact Kodak 300 Projector for $64.50, the Kodak Retina IIIS 35mm Cameras from $157.50 and the Cavalcade 520 Projector for $124.50.
December 7, 1959
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 156

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their Automatic 35 Camera. There is a close-up shot of this camera with several slides behind it that were taken with this unit. The headline promises "Great Shot...Every Shot!" and says the "New Kodak Automatic 35 camera sets itself for you!". The text talks about many of the features, about how wide the lens will open and gives a price of $84.50. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View
Camera 88

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13" ad that is touting the Kodak Brownie Starmite camera that is a "New! Midget camera...built-in flash $10.50". The photo in the ad has a lady holding a camera in her hand, the caption says "Palm size! Most compact flash camera Kodak ever made - actual size" in front of a car parked with a few people standing outside of it. The caption says that the "Brownie Starmite goes anywhere, gets pictures any time!" before it gets into the rest of the text. "A lot of camera - yet the new Brownie Starmite is the most compact camera with built-in flash in Kodak history. Easy to carry, easy to use, easy to wear anywhere you travel. This precision camera puts a world of picture-taking fun in the palm of your hand. Gives you 12 full-size shots on 127 films - day or night, indoors or out, in color or black-and-white. Even takes brilliant color slides you can show four feet wide. The Brownie Starmite Camera takes new extra-small AG-1 flashbulbs - giving you full light output at lowest cost ever. Two dozen fit into a shirt pocket".
June 6, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 139

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Brownie Starmeter camera with the Electric eye. The ad has a picture of a smiling lady who is holding her camera up as though she is going to take a picture of the reader. In the background is what she has probably just taken a picture of, her husband watching their son play with the dog. The ad headline introduces "New! Electric eye camera - only $19.95" and the ad explains that with this camera and it's automatic adjustments you will "..get 12 good shots on every roll of 127 film". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 7, 1960
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 51

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their film that features pictures of Ed Sullivan and members of his family. The ad has Ed saying "Show your best girl at her best - in Kodacolor pictures. Easy to take with any camera!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 18, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$8.00
View
Celeb Male 101
/ Kodak

Kodak
Black and white 5" x 13 1/2" ad for their popular Brownie Starflash Camera. There is a picture of this item sitting on a table with several pictures that I assume were taken with this camera and the caption says "Nothing to learn - and as little as $1 down!". The ad claims that "The flash is built right in!" and you can "Just aim and shoot, day or night. Takes color slides, too - with snapshot ease!" while having a List Price under $10.00. The text continues with more information about this item and has a smaller picture of the Brownie Starmatic Camera with an electric eye.
August 29, 1960
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 102

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for the Electric-eye camera by Kodak. The ad has a large photo of a lady with her Brownie Starmeter Camera on the beach while, in the background, a man is taking a photo of a lady who is standing on a small sailboat. The ad shows three different cameras with short descriptions and their prices. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 30, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 37

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that claims that "Now's the time to take a picture for your Christmas card". The ad shows three Christmas cards that readers have sent in to the Kodak company. The ad text suggests "Why not send a Christmas greeting as personal as a handshake? Photo-Greeting Cards made from your favorite picture means so much more to friends and loved ones. Your Kodak dealer has a wide choice of card designs. Why not take a special picture now? Then take the negative to your dealer. Your cards will be delivered in time for early mailing". They also have another camera for sale: the Brownie Starmite camera which has built-in flash and will get beautiful color snaps and slides. It could be had for less than $12.
November 3, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 123

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Kodak 8 Movie Camera. There is a picture of a father kneeling on a sand dune taking a movie of his wife and two children working on flying kites in the stiff breeze. The headline introduces the "New easy-to-use movie camera by Kodak...less than $35" and urges "This year catch all the action with the Kodak 8 Movie Camera!". The text talks about how easy it is to use with the automatic features and with the fast f/1.9 lens while mentioning the new faster and better Kodachrome II Movie Film that will make your movies even better.
June 5, 1962
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 89

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Fun-savers for '60...from Kodak. The ad shows four cameras that will help you save your summer fun in pictures. There is the Brownie Fiesta Camera priced at $6.00, the Brownie Starmeter Camera priced at $23, the Kodak S Movie Camera priced at $35 and the Kodak Automatic S Movie Camera priced at $55. The captions under each of these pictures give more details about each camera.
August 3, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 114

Kodak
Full color 7 1/4" x 10 1/2" ad for their new Electric-eye Picture technology. The ad shows four pictures of a hunting trip that were taken with a Brownie Starmatic II like the one shown in the ad next to a Kodak Automatic 8 movie camera. The ad headline claims that having pictures like this "Beats talking about it!" and that "Electric-eye pictures keep it - automatically!". The ad text gives prices of $35 for the camera, $45 for an outfit with flash, field case and film and $55 for the movie camera.
September 1962
Field & Stream
1
$7.50
View
Camera 56

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad shows three still cameras and one movie camera. The headline says these are the "Fun-Savers for '63...from Kodak". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 17, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 10

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Electric 8 Zoom Camera in addition to the Automatic 8 Projector. The headline says "Here's how Kodak has made personal movies simpler, surer...the nearest thing to life itself!" and is followed by three pictures that show the process. The first show a man loading a film cassette into his Kodak Electric 8 Zoom Camera with a description of the ease and a mention of the price that is less than $150. The second picture shows a smiling young boy running the Automatic 8 Projector by himself with a description and a price mentioned that is "Less than $110". The third picture is captioned "More lifelike on the screem" and shows a couple waterskiing with a description of the clarity that is achieved with this equipment. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 7, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 82

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the "Fun-savers for '63...from Kodak!" Shown in the ad are three different still cameras and one movie camera with descriptions and prices. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 30, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 30

Kodak
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for some of the cameras that were available as Christmas gifts for this year. The ad headline calls this ad "Your Christmas guide to the finest gifts from Kodak". Shown in this ad are the Instamatic 700 camera for $110, the Motormatic 35F camera for $120 or $100 for the manual-wind model, the Kodak Retina Reflex II camera for $230 and the Kodak Carousel Projector for $150.
December 6, 1963
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 58

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 12 1/2" ad intended to show the many cameras available to give as Christmas gifts in 1963. The ad has pictures of six different models with information and prices. The ad headline lets us know that "Kodak gifts say 'Open me first' and save your Christmas in pictures!" This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 13, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 29

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Hawkeye Instamatic Camera which was being offered to the public for free along with 7 packs of Kodacolor Film if you agreed to let them develop and print the pictures you took at their money-saving prices. The ad shows how simple it is to load this camera and talks about some of the amazing features this camera has. The text talks more about the offer and explains that the seven packs of film are actually one pack per month. Much of the rest of the text is devoted to the developing process and the kind of pictures you will be able to get.
March 27, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 101

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for the Kodak Instamatic Camera. The ad has a series of three photos that show a man taking a roll of film out from a box, dropping it into the camera and taking pictures. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 17, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 38

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that tells you how the "New Kodak Instamatic Cameras load instantly, automatically...and take sharp, clear pictures time after time!". There are three pictures at the top of the page showing an attractive young lady preparing to take a picture. The first picture shows her removing a roll of film from the box and the headline says Open". In the second picture she is taking the roll of film that she removed and putting it in the back of the camera, or, as the picture says, "Drop in". In the third picture she is holding the camera to her eye and focusing it and, as the ad says, "Shoot!". The ad tells us that "Two surprises await you in a Kodak Instamatic Camera. The first is the astonishing ease with which you load it. Just drop in a Kodapak Cartridge. And that's all. Instant loading. No film threading. No fumbling. No rewinding. The second, and even happier surprise, is the ease with which you can get 12 beautifully clear, sharp, crisp pictures out of 12. (Or 20 brilliant color slides our of 20!) Choose your Kodak Instamatic Camera from many models. Most have built-in, pop-up flash holder and automatic, electric eye: some even have automatic film advance. Prices are surprisingly low, too - complete outfits from less than $18."
August 14, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 133

Kodak
Full color 9 1/4" x 13" ad that wants you to order your supplies for taking your Holiday Pictures early enough to get the best values from the Kodak camera company. This ad has a Christmas Posterboard with Christmas cards attached to it. There is one with a mother and her two children saying "Blessings at Christmas" and another with a woman waving from trees in a field saying "Merry Christmas". There is a third picture with a mother and a daughter on Christmas morning with a "Season's Greeting" message on it and the fourth with a mother, father and their two children in a warmer situation saying "Christmas Greetings from Our Home to Yours". The ad says that you should "Send photo-greetings - so warm, appealing, and yours alone!" and that "Photo-greetings are Christmas cards only you can send; cards that will be treasured long after Christmas is over. And they're so easy to order. Just take the negative of your favorite snapshot (or take a favorite color slide) to your dealer. Then choose the card style you like best from his selection. It's as simple as that! But don't wait until too late. Order your photo-greeting cards now!".
November 6, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 126

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that shows the products they had available for Christmas 1964. The ad headline warns that "Kodak gifts say 'Open me first' and save your Christmas in pictures!" The ad shows the Instamatic 100, 500, 300 and 400 as well as the Brownie Movie Camera and the Automatic 8 Projector. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 11, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 40

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 3/4" ad that tells you that "Summer times like these deserve Kodak film". There are six very unique, hard-to-forget moments that have pictures taken to remind the person who took them, and us, about fun. There is a picture of a dog looking over the side of a boat, a girl riding a bike no-hands on the beach, a man holding his camera up, a young child playing in the sand with four or five birds withing two feet of her, a boy with a pail of, water? up to his face and a girl working away on a big piece of watermelon. The ad says that "As temperatures go up, guards come down. People's, pups' - even pigeons. Don't miss moments like these. Count on today's Kodak cameras and Kodak film to make any moment extra special - a memory to live over and over again. Ask for Kodachrome film for color slides and movies, Kodacolor film for snapshots. Be sure the name Kodak is on the box".
July 16, 1965
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View
Camera 134

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the Kodak Instamatic Movie Camera. This ad has a three sequence picture of a lady loading and using her camera. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 10, 1965
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 14

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that is designed to let you know that "Curiosity comes out best on Kodak Film". The ad shows five different pictures, mostly of chlldren doing inquisitive things, but one is of a mother looking outside of a window, probably at her child to make sure everything is OK. The ad text says that "The more your pictures mean to you, the more you'll appreciate Kodak film. Roll after roll, Kodak film is dependable. Ask for Kodachrome film for color slides and movies, Kodacolor for snapshots. And be sure the name Kodak is on the box".
June 24, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 135

Kodak
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 3/4" ad that is for the Kodak Instamatic 104 Camera. This ad starts off with a picture of everything that you would get with your purchase of the Kodak Instamatic 104 Camera. First we see the box, standard box. Then we see the camera, then a flash cube, then a strap, then a film reel and then two batteries. Then we see the headline that says we have a "Colorful Spring Outfit. Less than $20". The ad tells us, "It's all there. Everything to catch the colors of spring. Beautifully, and so easily. There's the famous Kodak Instamatic 104 camera that loads instantly. No threading. No fumbling. There's the Kodak color film you just drop in. And the pictures you get - beautiful, sharp, full-size color snapshots. Color slides, too, when you want them. Or black-and-white snaps". The ad goes on with more features.
May 12, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 150

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad shows a group of people piled up in a pyramid on the beach. The ad says that the picture was taken with a Kodak Instamatic 104 camera. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 1967
Boy's Life
0
$7.50
View
Camera 15

Temporarily
Sold Out

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad that shows "The world's most gifted camera". Pictured in the ad is the Kodak Instamatic 104 camera.This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 2, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 16

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for how easy it is to load the Kodak Instamatic 104 camera. The ad has a picture of a pair of female hands hovering over the opened back of a Kodak Instamatic 104 camera under the headline that assures us that "To load it is to love it". The ad tells us that we won't have to thread film anymore, just drop in the film cartridge and that we could buy a complete color outfit for less than $20.00. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 23, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 52

Kodak
Full color 10" x 13" ad in German taken from a German magazine. The ad is for the Kodak Instamatic 104 and shows the camera and the box it comes in after being unwrapped. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 15, 1967
Bunte Illustrierte
1
$7.50
View
Camera 23

Kodak
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for their line of Instamatic Cameras. The ad has a picture that shows their 124, 134, 174, 314 and 414 cameras. This ad includes information and prices on these models. The ad headline tells us that these are "Some smart new numbers just in time for Christmas". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 14, 1968
Saturday Evening Post
0
$7.50
View
Camera 48

Temporarily
Sold Out

Kodak
Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their Carousel Custom H Projector. The ad wants you to be aware of the fact that, to Kodak, this camera is handsome in use or waiting for another box of slides from another boring vacation to come back. Over pictures of this unit showing slides and closed up so that it looks like a piece of black and chrome furniture is the headline saying that "Kodak introduces a new Carousel projector that always looks its best. On. Or off.". The text talks about there being three models to choose from, mentions some of the features and that the price starts at less than $180.
December 1972
Harper's
1
$7.50
View
Camera 95

Minolta Weathermatic-A
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad intended on "Introducing the pocket camera that can take it when others can't". The ad shows a photo of the camera floating in a swimming pool and several others of a young lady using it in extreme weather situations.
July 1980
Playboy
1
$7.00
View
Camera 17

Nikon
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Nikon F camera which it identifies as "the choice of photo journalists the world over". Most of the ad is taken up with a picture of this camera from the front and the headline claims that "Today, there's almost no other choice". The text mentions that it is available with the standard prism reflex finder or the interchangeable Photomic T thru-the-lens meter system.
December 23, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 99

Nikon
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for their Nikkormat 35mm SLR Camera. There are two different photographs in this ad and the caption between them urges you to buy a "Nikkormat. When you know the difference between a snapshot and a photograph." The text explains what makes the one picture a "snapshot" and the other one a "photograph" before getting into a lot of detail about the features you will get when buying this camera. It ends by talking about the Nikon School of Photography and how it will make your efforts at capturing keepsakes that much easier.
May 20, 1974
Newsweek
1
$7.50
View
Camera 103

Nikon FE
Full color 7 3/4" x 10 1/2" ad for the camera that allows you to "Experience a sense of perfection". The ad contains a photo of the camera and text explaining the special features.
July 1980
Playboy
1
$7.00
View
Camera 18

Olympus
Full color 9 1/4" x 12" ad for their OM-1 Camera. The ad has a photo of this camera placed on a stack of maps, passports and pencils. The ad headline claims this camera is "On assignment around the world." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 1979
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 45

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Land picture-in-a-minute Camera. The ad contains step by step instructions with photos of how to use this amazing new product. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 13, 1949
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View
Camera 26

Temporarily
Sold Out

Polaroid
Black and white 10" x 13 3/4" ad for the two different Polaroid Land Cameras. The ad starts off by saying "Imagine fun like this - with 60 second snapshots!" and shows a father holding a picture of his little daughter trying to put a pair of white socks onto her feet. Below this picture it has a box that asks "Have You Seen Today's Polaroid Pictures? * They're big, sparkling black and white prints like this * A new plastic finish gives them lasting beauty * Every roll of film is guaranteed". The headings on the other items of interest are "Snap It! A Minute Later...The Fun Begins!", "You Share The Fun", "You'll Have Enlargements And Copies Made", "A Cinch To Use" and "Have You Seen A Polaroid Camera In Action Lately?". At the bottom of this ad it mentions the two kinds of Polaroid Cameras that were available, the Pathfinder and the Model 95.
September 28, 1953
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 155

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their "...Popular-Priced Pocket-Size Picture-In-A-Minute Camera". There is a large picture of the Polaroid Highlander opened up and ready for action and another of a finished picture being peeled from the developer. Other pictures show the camera being fitted into a suit coat pocket, a set of copies and enlargements made from a Polaroid picture and the flash attachment on the top of the camera. The text talks about the Low Picture Cost, how it is Amazingly Easy to Use and the fact that it produces Lasting Pictures that are of Top Quality.
June 21, 1954
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 92

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Land Camera. The ad has a photo of a camera that has just produced a photo of a young child. There are six arrows with six explanations pointing to six features of this camera with the ad headline "Do you know these 6 facts about the amazing 60-second Polaroid Land Camera?". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 9, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 32

Polaroid
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that calls attention to the Polaroid Land Cameras. The ad headline says that "OK - so he has a camera" and you ask, what else. "But does he have a camera that gives him a finished print 60 seconds after he takes a picture? Does he have a camera that gives him a second chance - that lets him see the results right on the spot so he can take a picture right over if somebody made a face or the composition wasn't just right? Does he have a camera that's so much fun to use that you can build a whole party around it - or make new friends on vacation in less time that it takes to introduce yourself? Does he have a camera that uses the newest kind of film in the world - a film so fast that you can take delicate pictures in soft light, pictures that never before were possible? Does he have a camera that's so simple to use that even a beginner can get terrific pictures right off the bat? Does he have a camera that's so versatile, so useful in so many ways...that three out of five owners use it in their work as well as for fun? There is no end to the advantage of owning a Polaroid Land Camera. You can do things with it that are just impossible with any other camera. It's the only camera of it's kind in the world, Even if he already has a couple of cameras - think about getting him one of these. It's the most exciting Christmas present you can give him. You can put it under the tree with his name on it for as little as $1.19 a week. Drop into any camera dealer's for a demonstration. Ask to see the simple Polaroid Land pictures he has. And if you've got a spare minute, let him take your picture. You'll be sold.". Shown at the bottom of the page are, left to right, the Polaroid Highlander for $69.95, the Pathfinder for $249.50 and the Speedliner for $89.75.
December 5, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 132

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad with the purpose of assuring us that using a Polaroid camera is not as expensive as one would think. There is a picture of one of their cameras with a box of film and a picture of a baby developing in the male hands coming in from off-camera. The headline as "How much does it really cost to own the 60-second !" and the text breaks it down for us. The camera costs $69.99 and can be purchased for $1.19 per week. A roll of film is $1.29 with eight instant pictures available for this cost. It also mentions the lack of waste because you will not end up using a whole roll to find out that the light was not right or something else prevented good pictures from being taken.
April 30, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 117

Polaroid
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for the Polaroid Land Camera with remarkable new film. The ad has two photos in it, they both concern Ed's big day at fishing. In the picture on the left the caption says "Ed took a picture of our first day's catch..." and, the picture on the right, is a picture of a picture and the caption says that "60 seconds later we knew it turned out perfect!". The ad text tells us that "There's no such thing as a vacation picture "getting away" when you're the owner of a Polaroid Land Camera. You see your results on the spot, and if that once-in-a-lifetime shot doesn't turn out exactly the way you want it, just shoot it over, wait another 60 seconds, and there's a honey. There's never any disappointment back home a week later when you find out some shots you thought were going to be terrific just didn't turn out. But eliminating the guesswork is only one thing. The big thing is the tremendous kick the whole family gets out of seeing the picture right away. At picnics, the beach, holidays, parties...everybody gets to enjoy these pictures as fast as the camera can turn them out. Something else. The quality of today's 60-second pictures is just plain terrific. There's a great new panchromatic Polaroid Land Film that gives you the richest blacks and snowiest whites you've ever seen. Details are razor sharp, in both light and shadow areas. And this new film is so fast that you can shoot in one-fourth the light you used to need. Makes no difference whether the sun's out or not. These pictures last, too, just like any fine prints. And it's easy to get all the copies you want. Enlargements are simply beautiful. Think seriously about getting one of these cameras. Drop into any camera store and take a look at it. They have a demonstration model sitting right there on the counter. Take a couple of shots of yourself. There's no trick at all to working it. How much? $69.95 or $1.19 a week and it's yours".
July 9, 1956
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 137

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Land Camera with new Panchromatic Film. The ad has a picture of a young girl dressed up in her mother's clothes, a scene that the mother has immortalized with her Polaroid camera. The headline says that with this camera you will "Snap it...see it!" and the text talks about not having to worry about the drug store messing up your pictures, describes the benefits of this new film and gives a price of $69.95 or $1.19 a week. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 84

Polaroid
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13" ad that is for the Polaroid Land Camera with New Panchromatic Film. The picture in this ad shows a man who seems to be amazed at the picture he has taken with his new Polaroid Land Camera. In fact, he has ejected the photo of his wife and his child, his mouth is slightly open and he has uttered the word "Wow!". The ad says that "When Pop opens up his Christmas present and sees it's a Polaroid Land Camera he'll bust out from ear to ear. But when he snaps that first picture...and 60 seconds later takes the finished print out of the back of the camera - there'll be no holding him. By turkey time he'll have the greatest collection of Christmas pictures you've ever saw. Here's why: First of all, there's a great new panchromatic Polaroid Land Film that gives you the richest blacks and snowiest whites you've ever seen. Details that are razor sharp. Delicate flesh tones that make your pictures of people look amazingly lifelike. Secondly, with this camera you eliminate the guesswork. If Suzy blinks or Eddie makes a face, you shoot another picture on the spot". The ad goes on describing why this camera, and this film, make this a wonderful gift.
December 17, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 159

Polaroid
Black and white 10" x 14" ad with Steve Allen. This ad, referring to the demonstrations on his NBC-TV Sunday night show, has a large picture of him holding the camera in one hand and a picture that he has taken in the other with the headline "It's a Darb!". There are a series of smaller pictures that show the sequence that resulted in the photograph that he took with the mention of a price of $69.95. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Celeb Male 193
/ Polaroid

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their Land Camera with new Panchromatic Film. There is a picture of a father and his young son in their workshop each holding up the model boat they have just built. Their smiling faces and works of art have just been captured by the Polaroid Land Camera and, as the caption says, "If Grandma could only see the two of them! A minute later I had a picture...all ready to mail off to her!". The text discusses the ease and simplicity that comes with using a Polaroid and how it is no more expensive to use than a reagular camera while only costing "$1.50 a week at most stores". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 86

Polaroid
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad with artist Salvadore Dali. The ad features an extreme close-up of the artist looking at the camera with a look of disdain and the text gives the explanation that this was enlarged from a normal picture taken from a Polaroid. The text mentions prices from $76.85; for the camera, not for his paintings
April 11, 1960
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Celeb Male 88
/ Polaroid

Polaroid
Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for The New Polaroid 10-Second Automatic Camera. The top 70% of the ad is a photograph of a young boy standing there next to his Beagle. The boy has a very stubborn look on his face, his hands in his pockets and his pants rolled several inches up his legs. The dog, as can be expected, is standing there with a very placid look on it's face. The ad headline says: "Don't just stand there; do something!". The text then says that "When you can say that, instead of saying "Hold it!" you'll get better snapshots. Natural. Unposed. That's the kind you'll get with the Polaroid 10-Second Automatic Camera. This new Polaroid Land Camera is fast enough to take stop-action pictures of the most active boy. Or a diver in mid-air. In bright sun, it's electric eye selects shutter speeds up to 1/1000th of a second. You never worry about your subject moving out of range, into a blur, because you don't have to focus. Yet pictures are always sharp; in portrait position you can work as close as 30". This camera couldn't be easier to use. Just aim and push three buttons. In any light, dawn to dusk, the electric eye sets the right exposure for you. (For indoors, there's a built-in flash) And because it's a Polaroid Land Camera, you see the picture in just ten seconds. You can buy a Polaroid 10-Second Automatic Camera for less than $75. Isn't this the time?".
November 17, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 125

Polaroid
Black and white 10" x 13 3/4" ad that was for the Polariod Land Camera. This ad has a photo in it of a passenger train that has stopped and the view is of a close-up of a passenger car with an elderly lady sitting there wiping her eyes as tears are flowing. The text tells us that "This picture came out of a Polaroid Land Camera in 10 seconds. It's the kind of picture that doesn't give you a second try. Either you get it or you don't. If you own a Polaroid Land Camera, you have a better chance to get it. Because the camera is a great teacher. Every 10-second picture you take is a learning experience that helps make you a better photographer. You'll take better pictures of your family this fall if you get a Polariod Land Camera now. And by early Spring, color film will be available for the same camera, too".
October 19, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 149

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Land Camera. The majority of the ad is a picture, taken with one of these cameras, of two you boys standing and waiting for their school bus. It is pouring rain and they are wearing their rain coats and hats and one is looking up while the other is laughing as he looks off to his right. The ad text has you pay attention to the different aspects of the photograph so that you can enjoy the quality of this picture and imagine what kind of a picture you will be taking with yours. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 2, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 75

Polaroid
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that demonstrates another of the kind of pictures you can take if you have a Polaroid Camera around. This picture is taken in some sort of outdoor cabin and it is taken with two Beagles. The one is sitting there, just looking, at the other one who has been placed inside of a tall boot. The one in the boot is very patiently sitting there as the two of them are just checking each other out. The ad tells us that "This picture came out of a Polaroid Land Camera in ten seconds. It shows you what you can do with an idea and a Polaroid Land Camera. Let's say you have the idea of posing your pups in a boot. Let's say the pups have some ideas of their own. If you're working with this camera, you know the outcome in ten seconds; and if it doesn't come out the way you'd hoped, you know the reason why, and you can try again. Get a Polaroid Land Camera now, and start enjoying the advantages of ten-second photography. By early spring, you'll be able to get color film for the same camera".
November 23, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 129

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that shows you an example of how good of a picture the Polaroid camera will take, in addition to getting your pictures within a minute. There is a Christmas picture of three young boys dressed up as characters from Dicken's Christmas Carol, two smiling and a third wanting out. The text talks about the quality of the picture, as good as a conventional camera, and how much more likely you are to have this camera with you. We all know how much of a ham little boys can be so it sure would be nice to have some way to keep those moments forever.
December 7, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 116

Polaroid
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Color Pack Camera and gives you an idea who to get it for. The first sentence in the ad says that "Father's Day is so far away, Mother" and mentions that if you buy one now he can take pictures in the Spring. The ad has a picture of a just-developed picture of a young smiling girl with her sunglasses perched on top of her head. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 8, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 81

Polaroid
Black and white 10"x 14" ad that has a picture taken of the new Polaroid Color Pack Camera. The ad text asks the question "If this new model of the Polaroid Color Pack camera takes the same size pictures, delivers the same great color prints in 60 seconds, black and white in 10, is just as automatic in making the right settings, even with flash, just as light, just as easy to load and operate, then what is different about it?" There is a picture of it at the bottom of the page and, at the very bottom of the page, is the answer to the question. "The price. It's a good deal less." That's a good answer.
September 25, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 119

Polaroid
Full color 10" x 13" ad that has a picture of a rustic farmer holding a turkey while his young daughter stands next to them with a look of apprehension on her face and the ad says that "The picture was made in a minute". The text continues by saying "You could wait a week for a color print and not get one half as beautiful. The Polaroid Color Pack Camera helps you get more interesting pictures, too. Since the electric eye makes all the settings for you, you're free to concentrate on the subject instead of the camera. You pick your moment, push some buttons, and in 60 seconds your peeling off your picture. (Ten seconds for black and white) Everything the family does this winter can be more fun if you own a Polaroid Color Pack Camera. Look into the new lower-price model soon".
November 27, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 122

Polaroid
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their Automatic 104 camera which they were calling their Economy Model. There is a picture of this camera lying on a white surface with a recent picture that it took standing in front of it. This picture shows a smiling man in a suit and cowboy hat sporting a red lei as a Hawaiian girl poses next to him holding the bottom of the lei. The headline claims it costs "1/2 the price" and the text talks about the quality being just as good as the more expensive models. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 20, 1965
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 80

Polaroid
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Color Pack Camera. Pictured is the top of a table which is holding a vase of roses, this camera and a picture of a mother holding her new-born twins. The text promises that "You can get color prints like this in 60 seconds", important pictures, and the prices for this convenience start under $60.
April 15, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 118

Polaroid
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that introduces us to the Swinger which was the newest Polaroid Land Camera. The top photo in the ad is of someone taking a picture of you so that you could see what the camera looked like and the caption for that picture says "Meet The Swinger 19.95". It then shows the photographer developing the picture. The bottom photo is of a person opening or splitting the film and we can see the photograph of the people the man at the top was taking. The text of that moment says that "The incredible new Polaroid Land Camera that gives you a black and white print 10 seconds after you shoot".
April 22, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 130

Polaroid
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Color Pack Cameras. The ad features a photo that shows their "most expensive automatic" and their "least expensive automatic" and has a headline that asks "Which one would you buy for yourself and which one would you give as a gift". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 27, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 31

Polaroid
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that is for the Polaroid Color Pack Camera. This ad has a picture showing an outdoor table with a picnic basket on it with a Polaroid Automatic 103 Camera and, in front of that, a photo taken of a smiling young lady on somewhat of a windy day. The ad tells us that "You can get color prints like this in 60 seconds with a Polaroid Color Print Camera. Is there any other way to take pictures? Prices start at under $60".
June 10, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 136

Polaroid
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for 5 new ones from Polaroid. The ad has a photo that shows these five along with descriptions and prices for them all. The headline, with amazing news, also says "(From under $50. No kidding. Under $50.)" but we find out by reading that only #1 is under $50.
March 31, 1967
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View
Camera 34

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Polaroid Swinger Camera. The ad headline claims that "19.95 Swings It" and the photo in the ad indicates that the camera seems to be very popular with just about everyone. In this photo there is a couple taking a picture of, what could be, a racer because there is a male wearing a helmet who is being photographed with his arm around a girl and there is, maybe 20 or so people, very excitedly watching the action. At the bottom of the ad the text says "The Swinger. The new Polaroid Land camera that gives you a black and white picture in 15 seconds".
April 21, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 158

Polaroid
Black and white 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that is another one for the Polaroid Swinger Camera. The ad headline tells it like it is by saying that "19.95 Swings It" and the picture shows what it does. It seems that there were a group of late-teen couples that, one day, just had nothing better to do than hop on bicycles and head out for a bike ride. They got where they were going and gathered together and just started taking pictures with the Polaroid Swinger Camera that one person just happened to bring along. He is taking picture after picture and his work is being enjoyed by some as other pictures are being taken. The headline at the bottom of the ad says "The Swinger - the new Polaroid Land camera that gives you a black and white picture in 15 seconds".
May 12, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 157

Polaroid
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their Color Pack Cameras and the precious moments they can help you remember. There is a picture of a picture being developed, of the backing being peeled back to reveal the image of a young boy with glasses and a determined look on his face holding up a frog as proof that he certainly is a boy. The headline says of the moment that you peel the backing and see what you have captured as "It's like opening a present". To be able to do this is amazing, to be able to do it starting under $60 is even more so.
September 23, 1967
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View
Camera 97

Temporarily
Sold Out

Polaroid
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that was for the Polaroid Land Camera Automatic 210. This was a simple advertisement, just showing a picture being opened up that probably had a very special memory for the people there. It was a picture taken showing a grandfather holding on to his granddaughter, both smiling and the picture was being opened up by, judging by the hands, the man between the two ages shown in the picture. The only words in this ad say that "Life goes by so fast. Stop for a moment and take a look at it". At the bottom of the ad, under the picture of the camera that was responsible for the picture, are the words "(From under $50)".
November 10, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 152

Polaroid
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that was for the Polaroid Land Camera Automatic 210. This was another of the simple, yet effective ads that were done by Polaroid. In this ad it shows the paper being taken off of a beautiful picture that shows two ladies sharing a photo as they take time out from their hobby of ice skating. They are dressed warmly and are both holding their skates as they bunch together, partially for the picture but, I would think, also for the cold. The ad tells us that "Life goes by so fast. Stop for a moment and take a look at it". Below the picture of the Polaroid Land Camera Automatic 210 at the bottom of the page it says that it could be purchased "(From under $50)".
November 24, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 154

Polaroid
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for "The 60-second excitement". The ad says that "It's everywhere" and has a picture of what looks like a carnival grounds where the performers are taking pictures with the customers and sitting and looking at what is developing. The ad asks "Do you have your Polaroid Color Pack Camera?" and claims that it is priced at under $50.
April 19, 1968
Life magazine
0
$7.00
View
Camera 94

Temporarily
Sold Out

Polaroid
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 3/4" ad that advertises the Polaroid Color Pack Camera. This ad shows a view that is very much one that you would want to remember. It is a scene from a Sunday afternoon get-together where everyone, from the elderly down to those of who are wondering just why they are there. There are ladies with hats, men in suits and smoking cigars, everyone talking and conversing and, yet, most everyone is looking at the pictures that are being taken, pictures that are being developed right there in front of them. The ad calls it "The 60-second excitement" and says that "It's everywhere. Do you have your Polaroid Color Pack Camera? (Under $50)".
May 24, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 151

Polaroid
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that was for the Polaroid Swinger Camera. This ad has two pictures, the top one is showing a picture of the boy taking a picture with his Polaroid Swinger Camera, standing next to his girl friend. The headline, below this, says "Now - a Big Swinger" and, below this, it says "Brand new camera, much bigger pictures". It then says that "It's the Polaroid Swinger grown up! Gives you big black-and-white pictures like this - in seconds. Loads instantly with the famous Polaroid film pack. You don't have to focus. This new Polaroid Land Camera makes close-ups, freezes action, has a shutter speed of 1/200th of a second. Built in photometer says "yes" when the light is right for shooting. Built-in flash, too. For $24.95...swing". To the left of this it has the picture that was being taken by the people in the top, and it says that it is the actual size.
June 14, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 153

Polaroid
Full color 9 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad that says that "Last Christmas this Polaroid Land Camera was just an idea. So automatic it even calls you when your picture is ready". On the left side of the ad it shows a front view and a back view of this camera and in the bottom right side it shows a color picture that was taken of a man and two children on Christmas. The ad text says that "We've done it. The camera that calls you when your picture is ready. This is the Countdown 350. One of the most automatic cameras in the world. The moment you shoot, the 350 starts making decisions for you. The electric eye tells the electronic shutter how much light to let in when you shoot. Pull the film packet, and the electronic timer "beeps" the instant your picture is ready. Tt's one of the most versatile models we've ever made. You can take blaci-and-white shots indoors. Without flash. Automatic time exposure. Even portraits and close-ups with special attachments. And it's one of the finest Polaroid Land Cameras ever made. It has a sharp 3-element lens. And a Zeiss Ikon double image rangefinder viewfinder. There are great cameras in Polaroid's Countdown line. Starting at under $80. (The Model 330.) They all beep or buzz to tell you that your picture is ready. They're gifts that speak for themselves. Now you've heard everything".
November 14, 1969
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 131

Polaroid
Full color 10" x 13" ad that shows the Model 350 Countdown camera. Above the view of the camera is the headline "When it's done absolutely everything, it lets out a little cry of triumph. (Beep)". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 8, 1970
Life magazine
1
$7.00
View
Camera 24

Polaroid
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Colorpak II camera. The ad shows a snapshot of a grandmother posing with her shy little granddaughter and the headline asks "Can you get any more out of a minature? (Or out of $29.95?)" The text tells us how short 60-seconds really is which is the time it will take this camera to develop a picture as priceless as the one shown in the ad. It then talks about the low price and mentions the many features that come with the camera making it seem like quite a bargain.
October 2, 1970
Life magazine
1
$7.00
View
Camera 115

Polaroid
Full color 10" x 13" ad has two photos of a grandmother. One has "(Two much flash)" and the other has "(Focused Flash)". This ad is for the Polaroid Focused Flash 400. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 19, 1971
Life magazine
1
$7.00
View
Camera 25

Realist
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the stereo camera that allows you to see in 3-D. The ad shows a close-up of the camera and has several photos of people talking about the unique abilities of the camera. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View
Camera 20

Revere
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the "new 'Theatre-Tone' Sound Projector". The ad has a nice photo of the unit and gives many reasons why it is the best buy. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 17, 1948
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 9

Revere
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the Revere Cine Graphic Enlarger-Viewer. The ad also has pictures, descriptions and prices for other Revere products. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 27, 1950
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Camera 8

Revere
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their 3 Dimension Camera and Viewer.. The headline claims it is "So lifelike you feel you're there" and if the expression on the face of the lady who has just taken a look into the Viewer is any indication, it might be true. There are several pictures that show examples of the kind of unique settings you can consider taking pictures in, a picture of a man pointing to the two lenses this camera has and another showing that "Even beginners get fine results from their first roll". At the bottom of the ad is a picture of this camera with a description of its features and stating the price is $174.50 and the Viewer which cost $18.50.
December 1, 1952
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View
Camera 90

Temporarily
Sold Out

Revere
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their 8mm Cine-Zoom Electric Eye-Matic Camera which was called the "world's first completely automatic camera with continuous super-sharp Zoom action!". There is a nice picture of this item with captions saying that it had "Normal, wide angle and telephoto lens coverage with continuous sharpness throughout entire zooming range!" and that it was "Completely automatic with Back-Light Compensation". The ad gives examples of the pictures resulting from one lens instead of three and describes more of the general features. It mentions that the Model CA-7 that came with a Spool-Load was priced at $179.50 and the Model CA-8 that came with Magazine Load was priced at $209.50. It also shows the "777" 8mm Projector which had a cost of $127.50.
June 1959
Holiday
1
$7.50
View
Camera 112

Revere
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their 8 mm cameras with sensational zoom action. The ad has photos of their Power-Zoom camera and their One-Zoom camera along with prices for these items and other accessories. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 7, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 28

Ricoh
Full color 9" x 11 3/4" ad for their KR5 35mm SLR Camera. The ad has a photo of a young man, fully dressed, jumping into a swimming pool as another man, in a bathing suit watches in confusion. The ad headline begins "Introducing the new Ricoh KR-5: The first 35mm SLR designed and priced for the beginner." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not boe visible in the scanned view.
November 1979
Life magazine
1
$7.00
View
Camera 44

UniveX
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for their Cine "8" Movie Camera. The ad has a photo of the camera, a price of $9.95 and several photos that show the life of a girl being recorded for posterity. The ad headline says that you can use this camera "All Through Life". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 28, 1937
Life magazine
1
$9.00
View
Camera 33

Victor
Three color 6 1/2" x 10" ad for their Lite-Weight 16mm Sound Motion Picture Projector. The ad has a picture of a darkened living room where a group of people are comfortably watching a movie. The headline assures you that "The world is yours with sound movies" and the text talks about the "thousands of sound films available". There is another picture that zooms in on the unit and the text mentions a purchase price of $375.
February 1948
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View
Camera 64

Wittnauer
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Cine-Twin, a product that is a "Fabulous All-Electric Movie Camera and Projector in one". The ad has a series of pictures that show how you can go in "30 seconds from Camera to Projector". The text makes the claim that having this one unit instead of two seperate ones will "save you over $100". The text includes information about this unit including information about the lenses while mentioning the price of $169.50.
November 10, 1958
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 96

Yashica
Black and white 10" x 13" ad for their 8U-P Zoom Cameras. There is a side-view of this camera with the caption "you push the buttons..." followed by a front-on view and the caption "...we take over!". The text talks about some of the features of this unit and gives the price as being "Under $160". It then mentions the prices and model numbers of other cameras offered by them as well as some of the accessories available. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 7, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camera 83










BACK TO HOME PAGE