Camel Ads


These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.

These ads are listed in chronological order with the oldest ads listed first.

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DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
IMAGE
PAYPAL
Black and white 11 3/4" x 9 1/2" ad that encourages you to smoke Camels to help your Digestion. The ad has several pictures of different situations in Life and the informative headline says that "Modern Life is a strain on DIGESTION - For Digestion's Sake - smoke Camels". The largest picture shows several tables filled with diners at the beautifulTrianon Room at the Ambassador in New York and it is generally agreed that most of the patrons "from all over the country" prefer Camel. There is another picture of a group of frenzied people shoving their way into a department store and the caption offers the advice to smoke Camel so your stomach will be less affected by the stress. The next picture shows the Arctic exploring boat, the Morrissey, and offers a quote from its leader, H. McCracken who claims they all smoked Camels "at every meal and after (to) help digestion". Last there is a picture of figure skater Betty Chase who claims that "Camels make food taste better and help digestion along."
March 9, 1936
Lansing State Journal
0
$8.50
View Camels 53

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Black and white 5 3/4" x 4 3/4" newspaper ad for the Health Values of Camel Cigarettes. The ad has a photo of Wild Animal Collector Frank Buck and his group riding a herd of elephants into the jungle of Malaysia and another, close-up photo, of a young lady smoking a cigarette. The ad headline warns you "For Digestion's Sake - smoke Camels". There are two small holes in the bottom of the ad.
March 10, 1936
Grand Rapids Herald
0
$8.50
View Camels 42

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Black and white 11 1/2" x 9 1/4" newspaper ad for this cigarette back when they used to claim cigarettes were "good" for your health. The ad has several photos of people at work and play in the world of the 1930's. The ad headline claims that "Modern Life is a strain on Digestion. For Digestion's Sake - smoke Camels". This ad is wider than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 12, 1936
Grand Rapids Herald
0
$8.50
View Camels 40

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Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" newspaper ad saying that "High-Speed living taxes digestion - For digestion's sake - Smoke Camels". There is a small tear in one of the folds. March 24, 1936
Grand Rapids Herald
0
$8.50 View Camels 5

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Full color 9" x 13 1/2" ad that urges you to smoke Camel Cigarettes whenever you are having a busy day because it will Aid Your Digestion. The ad has several pictures of "The Varied Activities of Mrs. Louis Swift, Jr." and the text explains how she can go from being a Sportswoman to Formal Dining Out with no digestion problems. She, and other distinguished women who are listed in the ad, all feel that the benefits of Camel Cigarettes make this possible. It explains how, when she is giving a formal dinner, she will "always allow enough time between courses so that everyone may smoke a Camel through." It also claims that "Smoking Camels promotes the natural flow of the fluids necessary for good digestion. Alkalinity increases. Tension eases. A comforting 'lift' follows". With logic like this I can't see why elementary schools didn't have the lunch ladies passing Camel cigarettes out at lunch rather than just dropping their ashes into the stew.
February 1937
Town & Country
1
$9.00
View Camels 55

Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for "The Largest-Selling Cigarette in America". The ad has five different photos of people from different professions that smoke Camel cigarettes and are happy that they do. The main photo, the only one in color, is of Cowboy Ted Yochum resplendent in his big white cowboy hat, blue shirt with white trim and a white bandana tied around his neck as he answers the question "Do Cow-punchers appreciate Camel's Costlier Tobaccos?". There are also pictures of Salesgirl Miss Elsie Schumacher, radio engineer Gene English, Sports Editor Stuart Cameron and Railroad Signalman John Geraghty.
January 17, 1938
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Camels 46

Ad with multiple pictures of John I. Wagner, a test pilot, testing a new Vultee plane. May 22, 1939
Life magazine
0
$8.00 View Camels 3

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Camels & Prince Albert Seasons Greeting. Ad shows gift boxes. Some soiling on white border areas of ad December 16, 1940
Life magazine
1
$8.00 View Camels 4
Full color 10" x 13" ad that shows a photo of Test Pilot Bill Ward. The ad also shows several photos of the XSB2C-1 Dive Bomber which is called "the Navy's new dive-bombing sensation". This ad was a back cover and has a little grime worn in.
October 27, 1941
Life magazine
1
$6.00
View Camels / Aviation

Full color 10" x 12" ad that reminds you that "You want Steady Nerves to launch a 'tin-fish' or make one!". The ad features a drawing of a submarine launching a torpedo and shows photos of a sailor and another of a lady who calibrates gyroscopes on torpedos.
October 5, 1942
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 10

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Full color 10" x 12 1/4" ad that has a headline "When the Garands give". The ad shows soldiers undergoing "commando-type" training.
November 16, 1942
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 9

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Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a wartime theme. The ad has several photos of Marines training and using amphibious Alligators to traverse water, sand and jungle. The ad calls them "Alligators with a bite of steel!". This ad was a back cover of this magazine and has a portion of the address stamp in the bottom right corner.
May 17, 1943
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 29

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Full color 7 1/2" x 10 3/4" ad that both urges you to purchase and send Camel cigarettes to your loved ones who are overseas at the same time that it discusses the important things that need to be done by both those at home as well as soldiers on duty. There is a drawing of a lady sitting with her young son nearby and thoughtfully composing her daily letter to her husband stationed overseas. The caption indicating what she is going to write says "Today we bought a War Stamp for Bobby - and Camels for you!". The photograph in the picture shows a very happy soldier sitting in his bunk with an opened carton of Camels next to him and the precious letter from home in his hands. The text talks about the importance of the letters from home are to soldiers in any of the services and claims that cigarettes from home are nearly as important. It mentions "there are 200 cigarettes in a carton of Camels...and with every one he lights, he'll be thinking of you - glad you thought of him". The ad claims that Camel cigarettes are First in the Service and bases this claim on "actual sales records in Post Exchanges and Canteens".
September 1943
Good Housekeeping
1
$8.00
View Camels 56

Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for The Favorite Cigarette with Men in the Army, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard. There is a picture of a boat being tossed in the heavy waves with an arrow pointing near the top of the main mast. The next picture shows a close-up of the man who is manning the position in the crow's nest that the arrow was pointing to, the man who stays on watch for any enemy submarine and the headline says "They've got what it takes". The next picture shows a man in foul weather gear relaxing with a Camel cigarette while saying "Camels have been a standby with me for 8 years. They suit me to a 'T'". The text tells about how much these sailors and all soldiers look forward to relaxing with a Camel while the last picture shows a woman, Inez Dale Myers, identified as a naval shipyard worker smoking a Camel while saying "I find Camels just right for me. Easy on my throat and full of flavor"
September 20, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Camels 48

Full color 10" x 13" ad shows several photos of Uncle Sam's 'Iron Ponies'". There are two shots of soldiers in action on their motorcycles and one of two soldiers sitting on their parked bikes and sharing Camels. Small 1 1/4" x 1/4" water stain on lower right corner.
January 17, 1944
Life magazine
1
$6.00
View Camels 11

Full color 10" x 12 1/2" ad has a drawing entitled "Home on Furlough!" The drawing shows a young soldier with his forefinger to his lips as his mother talks on the phone and tells whoever "Don't mail them, John - Bring the Camels - and hurry!" The ad contains the claim that Camels are "The favorite cigarette with men in the Army, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard. (Based on actual sales records)"
February 7, 1944
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 13

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Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that indicates that Camel cigarettes were popular with soldiers during World War II. There are several photos of the actions of Blimp Patrol with one showing a member of the group standing in front of a hanger holding a lit Camel and giving a speech about what is good about Camel. The photos show a blimp nose out of the hanger, a view of a soldier peering out of the observation deck with binoculars and another of a blimp overhead. The text gives some information about these aircraft before giving information about Camels and the "T-zone".
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View Camels 62

Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" wartime ad for the cigarette that is First in the Service. The ad has a picture of a large group of Infantryman, standing at attention. There is a sample of the Expert Infantryman Badge which, according to the ad, is presented to the soldiers typified by Johnny Doughboy. The ad headline over the picture of soldiers claims that "They've got what it takes!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view. There is a little bit of dirt and faint fingerprints along the white of this ad.
July 24, 1944
Life magazine
1
$7.00
View Camels 41

Full color 9 1/4" x 12" wartime ad for the cigarettes that were called First in the Service. The ad contains a strip entitled "Danger..Aunt Nellie's Upstairs" that is about the exploits of Captain Charles Sharkey who has accumulated 1900 hours flying unarmed planes from China to India. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 30, 1944
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 32

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Full color 10" x 13" ad that shows Donna Atwood - the lovely young skating star of the 1945 "Ice Capades. The ad shows two photos of her in action and one sitting after the show with several soldiers.
March 19, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Camels 7

Full color 9 1/2" x 13" wartime ad for their Turkish Domestic Blend Cigarettes. This ad gives a look, via artist and correspondent Howard Baer, at the sights and action on the Chinese-Burma battlefront. Each drawing has a caption that helps to explain "Flashes from Burma Road". He notes that Camel cigarettes are the favorite of the G.I.s and tells the readers that, even though Camel cigarettes may be unavailable at times at your local store, you should get them whenever they are.
April 28, 1945
Collier's
0
$8.00 View Camels 1

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Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with the unfortunate information that "According to a recent nationwide survey: More Doctors smoke Camels than any other CIgarette". This late December ad has a picture of a snowy evening as a doctor arrives at a house making what we used to enjoy called a "House Call". The ad caption has a few lines of Twas the Night Before Christmas, specifically the "not a creature was stirring" part as it talks about the devotion that doctors of old had. The text talks about the extensive survey that was made covering 113, 597 doctors of all types from east to west, from north to south and the overwhelming winner to the question "What cigarette do you smoke, Doctor?" was Camel. It explains that, "Like anyone else, a doctor smokes for pleasure" and swoops in to talking about the T-Zone which is T for Taste and T for Throat. How right they were, the Taste came today and the loss of the Throat came tomorrow.
December 16, 1946
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 54

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Full color 10" x 13" ad reminds us that "Experience is the best teacher!". A photo shows a jammed tobacco store counter where "millions" buy Camel. Again there is the claim that "More Doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette".
March 17, 1947
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 8

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Full color 10" x 13" ad that has a picture of Ace Midget-Auto Racer Walter Ader. He is shown sittint in one of his race cars and is credited with saying "It's true in racing...in cigarettes too! I learned from experience that Camels suit me best".
August 4, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Camels 14

Full color 9 1/4" x 13" ad that encourages a families to give Dad a Carton on Father's Day. There is a picture of ad sitting in his striped easy-chair reading the morning paper while his wife and two children, all still in pajamas, sneak into the room holding a bright red carton of Camels behind their backs. The headline tells us that "More people are smoking Camels than ever before!" and encourages everyone to "Give Dad a carton on Father's Day Sunday, June 20". The text mentions that the special carton designed for Father's Day has a "Gift Card" embossed right onto the top.
June 14, 1948
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 47

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Black and white 10" x 13 1/2" ad for what to get your smokers for Christmas. A drawing of Santa Claus is at the top of the page with the wish for a "Merry Christmas for every smoker" and below him is a carton of Camel cigarettes in the christmas design and a container of Prince Albert Smoking Tobacco, also in a Christmas container. The text talks about the mild flavor of Camel and how they will give every one of your smoking friends pleasure and the Prince Albert will please the pipe smokers and those who roll their own on your list.
December 1948
Country Gentleman
1
$8.00
View Camel / Prince Albert

Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a large picture of Santa Claus wishing a "Merry Christmas for every smoker". The ad shows this colorful, ruddy-cheeked Santa behind a Christmas decorated carton of Camel Cigarettes. At the bottom of the ad is a Christmas box that holds a one-pound tin of Prince Albert Smoking Tobacco.
December 20, 1948
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Camels 38

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Full color 10" x 13" ad features Gladys Swarthout and Virginia MacWatters of opera fame. The ad shows them sitting in their dressing room and talking about the mildness of Camel cigarettes.
March 1949
Woman's Home Companion
1
$8.00
View Camels 12

Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad with Baseball Pitchers Gene Bearden and Johnny Vander Meer stating that its "Camels for Mildness!". There is a picture of these two pitchers in suits relaxing in an office filled with baseball memorabilia smoking Camels and comparing notes as to why they like them so much. There are two individual pictures of them in uniform pitching for their teams. The text talks about the 30-Day Mildness Test and brags that there was "Not one single case of Throat Irritation due to smoking Camels". On a picture of an attractive lady holding a lit Camel is illustrated the T-Zone that Camel ads were always referring to.
May 9, 1949
Look magazine
1
$8.50
View Camels 51

"Give Dad a present he's sure to enjoy-a carton of mild flavorful Camels" June 13, 1949
Life magazine
0
$8.00 View Camels 2

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Full color 7" x 10 1/2" ad with actor Dick Powell. The ad has a picture of a party where this star of stage and screen has wandered out to a balcony for a breath of fresh air and a Camel. The ad claims that, at this time, they were "starting their 19th year of friendship". This ad claims that "for Mildness - for Flavor Camels agree with more people than any other cigarette".
April 1954
Woman's Day
1
$9.00
View Camels 44

Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the Real Cigarette with a picture of one being smoked by Milwaukee Braves pitcher Lew Burdette. The picture is of him after a night game dressed in a red shirt and a gray coat lighting one up as he relaxes in the stands. The text mentions that he was a 3-game winner in the World Series and has him claiming that Camel has "More flavor" and they deliver a "Mild smoke, too"
June 23, 1958
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Camel / Lew Burdette ad

Full color 9 3/4" x 12" ad has a drawing of a couple who are just walking away from a hot-air balloon that has landed. The man is identified as Russell Youngblood of the Balloon Club of America.
November 1, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Camels 26

Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Turkish & Domestic Blend Cigarettes. The ad has a picture of a man with red hair sitting with his elbow on a piano keyboard and holding a lit Camel cigarette. He is surrounded by other musical instruments, lights and microphones with the caption describing it as "Good rehearsal. You've Ten Minutes off. It's Camel Time right now".
November 28, 1964
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Camels 36

Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Turkish & Domestic Blend Cigarettes. The ad has two photos of field engineer Orin Murray busy at his job which is "Building Tomorrow". The ad asks "Do you keep reaching for taste that's not really there?" and assures you that "Camel's real taste satisfies longer!". They offer "No fads. No fancy stuff", nothing but the knowledge that "The best tobacco makes the best smoke". The ad ends by chiding you to "Get with Camel - a real cigarette".
July 3, 1965
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
View Camels 52

Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a photo that shows a male hand offering a Camel Filter Cigarette to another male hand that is holding a now-empty pack of Camel Regular Cigarettes. The ad has the first hand saying to the second "O.K. Charlie, now will you try these filters? They're Camels!" and getting the response of "Thanks, but I've always smoked 'em straight. I'll get another pack."
June 16, 1967
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Camels 30

Full color 9 1/4" x 12" ad has two photos of cigarette smokers. The left photo shows several rich, snooty people dressed in their horse-riding clothes and the text talks about Mojor Hocum smoking a cigarette with his family crest on it. It states that "everybody will be smoking cigarettes stamped with their own family crest". The picture on the right shows a handsome man sitting on a split rail fence smoking a cigarette with no family crest on it.
December 15, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Camels 25

Full color 7 3/4" x 11" ad shows a man sitting back with his feet up, hole in one shoe, as he rests in front of a Taj Mahal type building. The normal quote, "I'd walk a mile for a Camel" is at the top of the ad and the hole in his shoe is meant to indicate that he has. The text mentions that "This message is strictly for smokers who never tasted a Camel cigarette".
June 1969
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camels 19

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for the Cigarettes that are worth walking for. There is a close-up picture of a man who is holding a lit Camel in front of his face. The smoke is lingering next to his left eye but he sheds nary a tear nor hazards a blink. The headline offers "A touch of Turkish smooths out taste in a cigarette. Who's got it? Camel. Start walking." The ad ends with the familiar claim that "I'd walk a mile for a Camel".
April &
May 1970
P;ayboy
2
$7.50
View Camel 58

Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that is another in their series about how not everybody is meant for a Camel Filter cigarette. There are two pictures of people smoking cigarettes, the first being several outlaw motorcycle riders parked on the street to either smoke a cigarette or cause trouble. The leader is identified as Studs Merkel who is showing off his own triple-filtered cigarette which may cause everyone to smoke triple-filtered cigarettes. Not quite. The next picture shows a casual male pausing at the front door of his house with his jacket tossed over his shoulder, a pack of Camel filters in his hand and a lit one between his lips. He, like you, can be the exceptions.
January 12, 1971
Look magazine
1
$7.50
View
Camels 71

Full color 7 1/2" x 10 3/4" ad for Camel Filters. This ad is another attempt to convince you that "They're not for everybody" with two pictures of people smoking cigarettes. The left picture is of Emile Gouche who is a well-known sculpture in his own mind and he is displaying his latest work of art after hand-painting the cigarette that he is smoking. Not a Camel man. The other picture is of a man standing out-of-doors with his jacket slung over his shoulder and a lit Camel between his lips and he is enjoying the life with a minimum of glitter.
May 1971
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camels 67

Full color 7 1/2" x 11" ad for the length that a man would go to in order to get a Camel, or other things that are good. The ad has a black background with dual openings to indicate an object being seen with a pair of binoculars. The item being watched is a pretty woman walking in the surf with a flattering bikini on. The text says that "Today, a man needs a good reason to walk a mile. Start walking." with an opened pack of Camel cigarettes shown so that you can make your choice as to which object you want to walk towards.
May 1971
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 64

Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Filter Cigarettes.The ad has two pictures of different kinds of men smoking cigarettes; different kinds of men, different cigarettes. The left picture shows a stout gentleman in a red coat sitting on a troubled horse. There are two riders out for a hunt with each having a second to help with the hunt although the second for the stout gentleman seems to be holding him on the horse. The text says that "On his last hunt, Major Hocum smoked a cigarette stamped with his family crest. Now everybody will be smoking cigarettes stamped with their own family crest>". The second picture shows a casual, normal man sitting on a split rail fence smoking a Camel Filter and the caption says, "...almost everybody". We are reminded that "They're not for everybody. But then, they don't try to be."
October 8, 1971
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Camels 59

Full color 7 1/2" x 11" ad that reminds us that "They're not for everybody." This ad, done in shades of Pink, has two pictures of people who choose to smoke Camel Filters. The picture on the left is of a fashion designer, Mr. Stanley, who offers a free pack of short, short filter cigarettes to every man who buys a pair of his Hot Pants for Men. The caption says apprehensively that "Now everybody will be wearing hot pants and smoking short-short filter cigarettes." The next picture shows a man in dark long pants, a pink shirt and with a coat tossed casually over his shoulder smoking a Camel as he comes walking out of a restaurant and the caption says "...almost everybody."
February 1972
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 68

Full color 7 1/4" x 10 3/4" ad that features photos of two different types of men. The first is a group of men on Muscle Beach that are flexing in their unusual swimwear while showing off their puffing strength and the second photo shows a a cool young man with his jacket over his shoulder as he leans against a post at the boatdock. Which photo reflects the Camel smoker?
July 1972
Playboy
0
$7.50
View Camels 20

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Full color 7 1/2" x 10 3/4" ad shows a close up of a pool table that has a crumpled up pack of Camel cigarettes sitting on the side rail. The ad headline explains that "Today, a man needs a good reason to walk a mile. Start walking".
July 1972
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camels 22

Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for the fact that Camel Filter cigarettes, well, They're not for everybody. There are two pictures of people enjoying cigarettes, one a Major Hocum who is plumply sitting on his horse and he is wearing the red jacket common with people who :chase the fox". It is said that he smokes a cigarette that is stamped with his family crest which will start a fad where everyone smokes a cigarette with their family crest. Well, alm ost everybody. The next picture shows a simple man sitting on a split rail fence quietly enjoying his Camel cigarette.
November 1972
Playboy
1
$7.50
View
Camels 70

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 1/2" ad that tries to convince you that smoking Camels are not for everyone. There is a picture of a park with a gazebo on a sunny day and the lawn is filled with a variety of unusual individuals. The ad headline asks "Can you spot the Camel Filters smoker?" and the text eliminates each of the characters leaving just the normal man watching the others as he walks with his coat over his shoulder.
April 1973
Car Craft
1
$7.50
View Camels 45

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that wonders just how strong smokers like their Camel cigarettes. Pictured with a closeup is a stunning redhead who seems to be tearing a pack of Camel cigarettes open with her teeth. As she looks inquisitively at the reader she wonders "Would he walk a mile for me?", just as the reader is wondering "Could I walk ten yards for her?"
May 1973
Playboy
2
$7.50
View Camels 63

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that shows another example of how much a man will do to get a Camel cigarette. Pictured is a nice peaceful lake with no defelopment in sight and a man has been spending his day fishing. The crumpled pack of Camel indicates that he has run out so he jammed his rod into some rocks with his hook still cast into the water. The rod tip is bending and the line is taunt indicating that, while he walks to a semi-nearby store to buy another pack of Camel cigarettes, the fish that is now taking second place in the day's importance. The headline says it all when it says "Today a man needs a good reason to walk a mile. Start walking."
September 1973 &
September 1974
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camels 16

Full color 8" x 11" ad that is another in their series that asks "Can you spot the Camel Filters smoker?" There is a picture of a street where a Fireman's Parade is going on and the text claims that even here, "everyone seems to have a gimmick". The ad picks out five of the people in the scene and identifies them as a discount diner owner, two icky-poo radio TV personalities, a man that spends too much time setting up and a bvass drum player before finally getting to the everyday person, just like you, who needs no gimmick to be pleased.
October 1973
Cycle
1
$7.50
View Camels 49

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for the fact that Camel cigarettes are too good to change. The ad shows an opened pack with a lit cigarette lying across the top and the headline calls it "The original cigarette". The text explains that Camel is still using The Original Length of their cigarette, The Original Camel is still being pictured on each pack (his name is Old Joe), each pack still has The Original Disappearing Pyramid on it and it is still The Original Blend. As is stated at the bottom of the page, "Camel. You don't change a good thing."
March 1974
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 71

Full color 8" x 11" ad that is another in their "Can you spot the Camel Filters smoker?". The scene is of a barn that is having a sale of old items stored inside and there is a varied group of shoppers to choose from. The text indicates that it is not the man leaning on the old car to touch a racoon that he mistakenly thinks is stuffed, it is not the man standing outside looking in who has just bought a leaking water bed, it is not the shapely blonde who didn't wear the glasses that she so desperately needs, it is not the man about to purchase another painting that may also turn out to be something less than what he expected and it is not the old man sitting in an old antique, wooden chair that has just made one more "creak, snap" than it should have. It turns out to be the man in the '70s haircut with a jacket tossed over his shoulder who is examining a motorcycle that he is familiar with. The text says "Camel Filters. They're not for everybody (but they could be for you)"
April 1974
Playboy
0
$7.50
View Camels 50

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Full color 7 3/4" x 10 1/2" ad that is another in their series that asks "Can you spot the Camel Filters smoker?" from a group of eccentric individuals. This ad has a picture of an old pier where a man with an inner tube for a belt while wearing a white nightshirt and a red crash helmet is talking to a rugged-looking individual. In the background of the picture is a fisherman clad in yellow rain equipment from head to ankle and a chef who looks like he is trying to get some "fresh" fish to cook and serve. In the right front corner of the picture is the man we are looking for, a man who casually kneels as he fishes and enjoys the cigarette in his hand. The lower headline says "Camel Filters. They're not for everybody (vut they could be for you).".
May 20, 1974
Newsweek
1
$7.50
View Camels 57

Full color 7 1/2" x 11" ad that is another in their Can you spot the Camels Filter smoker?. Pictured is a spot in the outdoors where a group of people has gathered in preparition for a hunting and camping expedition. The group includes people who buy all the new gear, wear unusual outfits and speialize in tracking trains. It also includes a man in a plaid shirt holding a saddle that he will soon be putting on the back of the horse that will take him away from the insanity around him. Camel Filters are not for everybody, But they may be for you."
July 1974
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 67

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that is another in their series asking "Can you spot the Camel Filters smoker?" There are six people at the beach standing in line for the truck that sells cigarettes, ice and things to drink and eat. In this line are a man who strums his guitar and screeches out songs, a thin blonde in a bikini and a need for attention, a bodybuilder who is flexing as he stands in line, a thin "pest" who, it is claimed, has the number 58 on his jersey because it is his I.Q. and a chubby man, shirtless, who has the outline in sunburn of a tank top on his upper body. Talking to this last man is the Camel Filters smoker; calm, cool and realistic. As the headline says, "They're not for everybody."
October 1974
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 70

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that features another of their money-making enterprises. The man with the bushy mustache is back and shopping in the Camel Filters Leather Shop. He is wearing a Leather coat and talking to a real lady who is smoking, probably a Camel, while behind him are two mannequins who are wearing items of leather too. There are six numbered items in this ad which are items of leather that were being offered by Marlboro at discount prices with no proof-of-purchased required. The ad includes a coupon with prices on it to be filled out and mailed in for your order.
November 1975
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 69

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their Camel Filters which the headline calls "One of a Kind." Or the headline could be talking about the young pan who is panning for gold in a rocky stream as a lady with dark hair stares, open-mouthed, at him. The text waxes romantically about how this man is not seeking wealth but experience. He has his own way of capturing it and, wonder of wonders, he smokes for pleasure.
March 1977
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 65

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 1/2" ad for their Filter Cigarettes. The ad has a photo of a dark-haired man with a mustache wearing a wet suit and looking at some items while an old man with a white beard and a lady in a yellow bikini await his opinion. They are on a ship and there is a yellow mini-sub on a hoist in the background. The ad headline calls the cigarette, and the man, "One of a kind".
May 1977
Playboy
0
$7.50
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Full color 7 3/4" x 10 1/2" ad for their Filter Cigarettes. The ad has a picture of a dark man wearing no shirt and a pair of jeans squatting on the beach next to a blonde in green shorts and a green tank top who is smiling as she looks into his ear and watches the sunset on the other side of him. The ad headline describes the man, and his cigarette, as being "One of a kind".
May 1978
Playboy
0
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Full color 15 1/2" x 10 3/4" Two-Page ad for their New Camel Lights. The ad has a large picture of a male hand holding up an unlit Camel Light cigarette so that the Camel insignia is shining with a gold sparkle. The ad headline claims they are "Introducing the Solution. New Camel Lights" and the ad discusses how this is a low-tar cigarette with good taste.
May 1978
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camels 35

Full color 7 1/2" x 10 3/4" ad show a rustic cabin with a rugged young man leaning against a roof post smoking a cigarette while an attractive blonde looks at him as though he was going to reveal the winning lottery numbers. The ad headline calls the man and the cigarette "One of a kind".
February 1979
Penthouse
0
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Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that shows a close-up of a cigarette being pulled from a pack and the camel insignia has a sparkle to it. The ad headline tells you to "Try the solution. Camel Lights.
February 1979
Penthouse
1
$7.50
View Camels 18

Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that shows a large hand holding up a package of Camel Lights that seem to sparkle. The ad headline asks you to "Try the solution. Camel Lights".
March 1979
Penthouse
1
$7.50
View Camels 15

Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad has a photo of three men sitting and laughing in a bar as their hands are filled with Camel cigarettes. The ad headline describes "Camel Taste. Nothing else comes close."
October 1979
Playboy
0
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Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad for their Camel Filters. We have the man with the bushy mustache again and this time he has stopped his old motorcycle, with camouflage paint and a side car, on the beach long enough to light his Camel. Watching him with a look of awe is an attractive blonde who just happened to be walking on this deserted section of the beach. The headline tells us that he is experiencing "Satisfaction, Camel Filters style" made possible by their blend of Turkish and domestic tobaccos.
April 1980
Playboy
1
$7.50
View Camel 66

Full color 16" x 10 1/2" Two-Page ad for their Camel Lights. The ad has a picture of a seaplane that has landed on the surface of a very remote lake in some northern area. A man is carrying several items as he puffs on a Camel while splashing ashore. The ad headline says "Camel Where a man belongs".
October 1981
Penthouse
0
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Full color 9" x 12 1/2" ad for Camel Lights has a photo of a man with curly hair piloting a reed sailboat on a still body of water. The ad text mentions "Camel Lights. Low tar. Camel taste."
April 1984
Life magazine
0
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Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/4" ad for their Light and Filter cigarettes. The ad has a picture of a man who has been climbing a mountain, He has reached a ledge and has stopped to loop his rope around his leg and is lighting a Camel. The ad asks you to "Experience the Camel taste in Lights and Filters.
May 1984
Cycle World
0
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Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad shows a man sitting on a rustic porch high over a river lighting his cigarette as the evening comes on. The ad headline states "Camel Lights. It's a whole new world".
June 1985
Playboy
0
$7.00
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Full color 9 3/4" x 11 3/4" ad that shows two tanned and fit men arm-wrestling at an outdoor table while another man watches as he smokes a cigarette. The ad headline invites you to "Share a new adventure".
April 23, 1987
Rolling Stone
0
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Full color 9 1/4" x 11 1/4" ad has a drawing of Joe Camel in a pilot's jacket with a sexy blonde and flying jet planes behind him. The ad headline says simply that he is a "Smooth character". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 6, 1988
Rolling Stone
0
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Full color 9 1/2" x 11 1/2" ad for Camel Filter Cigarettes. The ad has a picture of Joe Camel wearing racing coveralls with a pretty lady behind him standing in front of a racing road course filled with speeding cars. The ad headline calls him a "Smooth character". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 5, 1989
Rolling Stone
0
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Full color 9" x 11 1/2" ad for their Filter Cigarettes. The ad has a picture of a table at an old diner. Sitting on that table is a cup of coffee, one hand holding a lit Camel while another one burns in the ashtray and an open box of Camel cigarettes. All this is sitting in front of an old jukebox that has the word Camel across the top and it's choices os songs are all songs about the quality of Camel sung by made-up groups. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 5, 1991
Rolling Stone
0
$7.00
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Full color 9" x 11 3/4" ad for their Camel Wides. We see two of the Camel characters, each carrying a pack of this cigarette. As the name implies, the packs are shown to be about the size of a 4' x 8' sheet of plywood and the two men are having difficulty carrying them and still smoke. One turns to the other and says "WIder" and the other responds "Smoother" as they make their way out for a night of fun.
April 2, 1992
Rolling Stone
1
$8.00
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Camel 69

Full color 8 1/2" x 11 1/2" ad for their Special Lights. There is a picture of Joe Camel in a white suit and blue shirt standing on the deck of a boat that has just gone under a tall, well-lit bridge. He has a lit cigarette in his right hand and is saying "This One's Something Special, Joe" and the special pack is shown in the ad.
October 14, 1993
Rolling Stone
1
$8.00
View
Camel 68









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