Aviation Ads

The ads on this page are aviation-related. Included are ads for specific manufacturers or models and for air lines.

These are just a small portion of the ads that we have for sale. None of these are reproductions, all are original. Most of these are large ads, larger than our scanner bed. Therefore the view shown on the page may not completely show the ad. They are placed in a plastic bag with a cardboard backboard for protection. Please e-mail us with your specific interests.


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BRAND
AD DESCRIPTION
SOURCE
QTY.
PRICE
VIEW AD
PAYPAL
Aero Commander
Black and white 10" x 12 1/2" ad for their Supercharged Aero Commander 680 which is boldly claimed to be "The fastest executive airplane designed and produced expressly for business use today". The text mainly talks about the Need for Speed for the Man at the Top and would have us believe that this is the plane to have. It promises a Top Speed of 260 m.p.h., a Normal Cruising Speed of 230 m.p.h. and a Normal Range of 1450 miles with a 30 minute reserve.
December 1955
Fortune
1
$8.00
View Aviation 84

Aeronca
Three color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that lets the people know about their Grasshopper plane that is being made and used by the U.S. Army. The text is in the form of a rhyme that continually gives information and ends by showing the insignia for these helpful planes that was designed by Walt Disney.
March 15, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 63

Aeronca
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that shows a small photo of their Champion model and talks about the fact that "America's oldest light-plane manufacturer" is First Again.
February 1946
Farm Journal
1
$8.00
View Aviation 14

Airlines of the United States
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that gave the general public an idea what The AIrlines of the United States were doing to help the war effort. The ad contains a drawing that shows us two white-haired gentlemen in fatigues looking out of a tent at night, past a soldier on sentry duty, at an airplane that is either taking off or landing. The headline calls this scene "Somewhere West of Suez" and the text explains that these planes were involved in transporting "the greatest gathering of military leaders in history" to a secret council of war, "almost in the enemy's camp". It goes on to say that planes are now able to allow global face-to-face meetings between important people to plan actions and to make the supplying of troops entirely possible in a scope never thought of before.
April 5, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime ad

Airlines of the United States
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" wartime ad for what many of the pilots and the pre-war commercial planes were doing to aid the war effort. There is a drawing of a twin-prop plane, with number NC 21320 on it's wing, flying in the evening sky as the headline introduces "A day in my life by NC 21320". The text talks about the number of trips made and the passengers carried being double what was done before the war and talks about some of the types of passengers and loads it was asked to carry. It talks about how the airlines had lain the groundwork for this situation in the earlier days which has made this transistion very easy and practical. It ends by offereing some advice about ways to help make your trip or shipment easier and suggests as always that you "Buy EXTRA WAR BONDS this month".
October 4, 1943
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime

Temporarily
Sold Out

Air France
Full color 10" x 14" ad that tries to give you the impression that flying on their airline is a lot like being in Paris. There is a picture of a happy businessman sitting upright in his seat. table in front of him spread with amazing food and having the steward showing the label of a bottle of wine for his approval. The headline calls this "Your first taste of Paris...3000 miles from France!" and the text describes some of the services you will receive on their Boeing 707 Intercontinental in the slightly more than 6 hour flight. The Economy Class Round-Trip Fare is listed as being only $532.20 from New York to Paris. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 51

Air France
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that assures us that Beautiful French Girls are not the only reason to fly this airline. The ad has a picture of a male passenger looking up at the lady taking his meal plate with a smile and a hopeful look on his face. The caption reasons that "A beautiful French hostess with a beautiful French accent is a beautiful French hostess with a beautiful French accent." The text lists talks about various flights at various times and various amenities after your flight that can be arranged if only you "Ask Air France".
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Aviation 97

American Airlines
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that discusses how much less time it takes for items and people to be transported through the air. There is a picture of an American Airlines crew standing in front of their plane that is parked on the snow and ice covered Artic. The headline calls attention to trips that took "Yesterday 6 weeks - Today 45 minutes". The text discusses a journey in New Guinea that previously had to be undertaken by horseback but is now able to be quickly handled in the air. It then question who is responsible for this tremendous improvement and gives some credit to the "General, Admirals, Airlines and Aircraft manufacturers" but it feels that most of the credit should go to the "air transport crews in the air and on the ground". The text continues by mentioning other ways that aviation has been improved by force-fed developments brought around by the needs of war.
1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime ad

American Airlines
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" wartime ad with the goal of assuring the public that some things could be depended upon. The ad has a picture of several farms on a day when the snow lies deep on the ground. The left side of the picture is in daylight and the right is after nightfall and, in the middle, is a low-hanging Earth with a plane flying on the left and another flying on the right. The ad text makes the simple yet wordy promise that "Every second of every hour - Of every day - and every night - In every season - Flagships are in the air - Saving transportation time - And countless man-hours - Expediting our nation's work." This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 7, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 36

American Airlines
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for using this airline to get away from the cold weather and travel to the sun. There is a drawing of a family of three sitting dreamily on their sofa and the headline urges everyone "Seeing sun spots in your dreams? ...stop dreaming!" and then tells you that "There's a Spot in the Sun for You only hours away by American Flagship". Beneath this are pictures of people enjoying themselves in Mexico, Arizona and Southern California and the text says that this and other locations are available as destinations at the time of your choosing.
February 1949
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Aviation 59

American Airlines
Full color 7 3/4" x 11" ad that claims that the MGM movie Three Guys Named Mike was inspired by the success of their Stewardesses. The picture in the ad shows a scene from the movie where Jane Wyman as a Stewardess is standing at the doorway of an American plane while passenger Van Johnson is standing behind her waving at someone out of sight to the reader. The text claims that the movie is very good and calls themselves "America's Leading Airline".
April 1951
Good Housekeeping
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Jane Wyman / Van Johnson

American Airlines
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that detailed another attempt to Fill Each Airplane, a goal that continues even today. The ad has a picture of a couple standing together, the man with a single carry-on bag and his golf clubs and his wife also with a single carry-on bag and holding a bird cage and a bird not sure what is going on. The headline is "Announcing American's 'Wife Vacation Plan'" and explains that you can Take your wife first class for half-fare". The text mentions that children get to fly half-price too, with all of the delicious food, but only if the man-of-the-house comes along, or something resembling him.
April 26, 1963
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 88

American Airlines
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that gives a few examples about how using a Travel Agent would have changed at least one journey. There are several humorous drawings beginning with a man in glasses talking to a soldier holding a sword and sitting astride a horse and telling him, "I'm telling you, sir, it's a rash idea". Other captions talk about "language troubles", a "wild convention" and "I doubt you'll make any new friends" before the headline says "I know it's your trip, General Custer, but as your travel agent, I'm only telling you". The text indicates that it probably didn't happen that way but it is a good idea to listen to travel agents since they do comminicate with the forms of transportation such as American Airlines. They are aware of the good deals and will be able to keep you away from the Little Big Horn, if something nasty is brewing there.
September 18, 1964
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 80

Beechcraft
Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad talks about the Beechcraft Bonanza. Pictured in the ad is a middle-aged man sitting at home in his den reading the newspaper. The headline claims that this man "Works in five states...home every night".
May 10, 1948
Time magazine
0
$8.00
View Aviation 11

Temporarily
Sold Out

Beechcraft
Three color 8" x 11" ad that displays the Beechcraft Baron as one of the solutions for transportation for busy businesses.
August 24, 1962
Time magazine
0
$7.50
View Aviation 2

Temporarily
Sold Out

Beechcraft
Black and white 7 3/4" x 11" ad for those of you who may have been interested in purchasing a Beechcraft Bonanza. The ad has a picture of one of these planes parked on a runway where a couple stands holding some of their skin diving equipment while another man is slowly packing more of their stuff into the rear of the plane. The ad headline tempts you by telling you to "Fly a Beechcraft vacation stretcher and always have more time for fun".
April 29, 1968
Sports Illustrated
0
$7.50
View Aviation 37

Temporarily
Sold Out

Beechcraft
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad with a photo of the new Beechcraft King Air B90 sitting on a runway being boarded by several comfortable businessmen. The ad headline asks the question "Is this the start of another dynasty?"
May 1968
National Geographic
0
$7.50
View Aviation 28

Temporarily
Sold Out

Beechcraft
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for their Bonanza line of planes. Pictured in the ad is a Bonanza V35B which is shown in the air and the headline promises that you will "Save time. Money. Fuel. Cover your territory in a Beechcraft Bonanza". The text describes some of the capabilities of these four to six place planes and claims that you will use "less fuel than a standard size 1974 automobile". It goes on to give specific fuel and time estimates for trips using a Beechcraft Bonanza as compared to the standard 1974 automobile and then makes the comparison even stronger by factoring in the "average of 3.1 passengers per trip". Then, as the reader's mouths began to water, it mentions the ease with which the normal human could learn to fly a Beechcraft Bonanza or, better still, use one of the "many excellent professional pilots available right now". It then tries to seal the deal by promising that you can use one of these planes "for about $170 per month net capital cost".
May 20, 1974
Newsweek
1
$7.50
View Aviation 68

BOAC
Full color 7" x 10 3/4" ad for the British Overseas Airways Corporation and their flights to Affordable Europe on a 707. There is a picture that shows a royal scene from London and the headline assures you that "For what shoes cost...$26 you can jet to Europe in the Rolls-Royce of the 707's". The text explains that $26 is the 10% down payment you will need for the $257 one-way trip (round trip $462.60) with 20 months allowed to pay the balance.
March 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 49

Boeing
Black and white 9 3/4" x 12" wartime ad with a photo of an in-process fuselage for a Boeing Flying Fortress being moved by crane over a floor full of similar weapons. The ad headline calls this "Flight without Wings" and the ad text explains some of the production line philosophies of the aviation giant. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 20, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Aviation

Boeing
Black and white 10" x 13" ad that shows a photo of "Another Boeing Superfortress starts for Japan". This is a wartime ad that reminds us of the cooperation needed to produce these planes in the quantity needed for war.
October 2, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime

Boeing
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad with a photo from underneath of a B-29 Superfortress with it's twin bomb-bay doors open. The ad headline describes this as "Double trouble - for Japs" and the text talks about the capabilities of this plane. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
July 9, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Aviation

Boeing
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad shows the front end and wing of a new Stratocruiser on the landing strip. The text mentions the different models they have, the airliners that are using Boeing products and promises that they are always "Testing, Testing".
April 5, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 15

Boeing
Full color 10" x 13" ad shows a Boeing 707 on an evening flight over the banks of a river. The ad talks about the 707 and 720 and gives a list of different airlines that have used Boeing planes.
July 14, 1958
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 10

Boeing
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that wants you to take your next flight on one of their 707's or 720's. The top picture in the ad shows a mother and her relaxed daughter reading the book Alice in Wonderland as they make a smooth flight on a Boeing 707 Jet. The text describes the flight as "Softly, surely and oh so smoothly" with a subtle reference to the speed of 600 miles per hour. It claims that already more than 270,000 passengers have flown on these jets and calls the Boeing 707 "the most popular new airliner in aviation history". It mentions that the 720 is designed as being a shorter-range plane and gives a list of the many airlines that have ordered one or the other of these planes.
June 1959
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 82

Boeing
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the Boeing 720 which is called the "World's Newest Jetliner". The ad has a photograph of a Boeing 720 that is being directed towards a parking area by a ground crewman who is signaling with lighted wands. The ad describes it as being "new, sleek and fast" and it is "designed specially to serve cities not now on the jet-travel map, as well as major centers". It is claimed that these jets will travel at over 600 miles an hour and that they can operate easily from shorter runways. It is claimed that United Air Lines will be the first to put these 720s in service.
May 1960
Holiday Magazine
1
$8.00
View
Aviation 109

Boeing
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that wants you to realize that "People who often fly jets...most often fly Boeing". There is a picture that shows a Boeing jetliner securely in the sky with a brown, leather briefcase underneath with about a half dozen flight tickets attached to it. The text talks about the comfort about flying on a Boeing and the fact that Boeing planes go to 150 cities and 74 foreign lands.
November 1962
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 86

Boeing
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for the "brilliant, new" Boeing 727. The ad has a total of 16 photos of this short-range jetliner, inside and out, flying and on-the-ground, and text that explains that four of these planes were being tested at this time with plans for airline usage to begin the following year. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 4, 1963
Look magazine
0
$7.50
View Boeing 33

Temporarily
Sold Out

Boeing
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 3/4" ad for the wide range of opportunities and projects going on in this company. The ad headline claims that "Capability has many faces at Boeing" and has a set of pictures to illustrate the claim. The largest is a drawing of a Saturn V in an early morning launch and the next one is a Twin Turbine Chinook with a short description of it's capabilities. Then there is a picture of a Lunar Laboratory with revealing information and an overhead picture of America's Newest Jet, the short-range Boeing 727 with facts about how fast it is selling.
December 6, 1963
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 39

Braniff
Black and white 10" x 13" ad that introduces the use of the Boeing 707-227 Jetliner to their routes between New York or Chicago and Texas. There is a drawing that nearly spans the page showing this jetliner in the air and the text mentions some of the advantages and luxury items you will get when you fly on this plane. The ad also mentions that this Jetliner will soon be coming to flights to South America. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1960
Holiday magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 53

Braniff
Black and white 7 3/4" x 11" ad for their Amazon Safari. This 18 day trip began with flights taking off from either New York or Miami and included floating down the Amazon on Hotel-Boats large enough for twelve guests. These boats offered entertainment that varied from hunting from the boat or just drinking and dancing. The ad headline calls it "The Civilized Safari or Crocodiles without Tears".
April 29, 1968
Sports Illustrated
1
$7.50
View Aviation 38

C-133 Cargomaster
Full color 10 1/2" x 7 3/4" photo of this plane flying over what might be San Francisco Bay. The plane is labeled U.S. Air Force and Military Air Transport Service
October 1977
Airman
1
$7.00
View Aviation 72

Caravelle
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for "The finest medium-range Jetliner the world over". This ad, done with background colors of the French flag, shows an overhead view of this plane flying and giving the illusion of speed. The ad says that it "Speaks softly in French...with a comfortable American accent!" and gives details about it being "Designed and built by Sud Aviation", "Sold and serviced by Douglas Aircraft" and they claim that it is "Made with French Flair to American Standards of air luxury".
February 3, 1961
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 58

Cessna
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad that tells the businessman "How to put your home office out where sales are made". The ad talks about the Cessna 190 and 195.
February 16, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 8

Cessna
Black and white 10" x 13" ad has a large photo of what you would see if you were looking out the windshield as you flew over a river. It includes a coupon that allows you to fly a Cessna with an instructor.
November 5, 1965
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 6

Convair
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for their F-102A All-Weather Interceptor. The ad has a picture of a quiet neighborhood in America with three F-102A's flying overhead to keep the peace. The ad headline claims that "Freedom Has a New Sound!".
August 1955
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Aviation 27

Consolidated Vultee Aircraft
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their B-36 Bomber and the upcoming COnvair 240. The ad shows the B-36 "Photographed on a recent test flight" flying overhead and the headline proudly proclaims that "America has The World's Biggest Bomber!". The text gives many specifics and claims about this plane and, as a sign of the times of that day, claims that "If this country were attacked" the B-36 could "drop bombs on any city in the world". The bottom part of the ad is devoted to the Convair 240 with the claim that "...The World's Most Modern Twin-Engine Airliner is on the way!". The text here mentions the speed of 300 MPH, the pressureized cabins and gives a list of airlines that have ordered fleets of this plane.
December 16, 1946
Life magazine
2
$8.00
View Aviation 45

Curtiss-Wright
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that talks about the Curtiss Commando Cargo Plane but also mentions the engines and propellers their companies individually produce. There is a large photo of a Curtiss Commando sitting in a desert landscape ready to take off and several other photos of wounded soldiers being brought home, the U.S. Navy's Martin Mars Flying Boat and a Boeing B-29 Superfortress in mid-air. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 30, 1945
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 31

DH125
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their new Business Jets. The ad has a picture of this plane flying proudly above the clouds and guarantees "more business jet for your flying dollar". The reasons they can make this claim are Higher Speed, Increased Range and Improved Airfield Performance. The ad also has smaller pictures that show an in-plane meeting taking place, a view of the cockpit with the pilot and co-pilot, a picture showing how comfortable the seating is for the passengers and a rested businessman deplaning at his destination with energy for his meetings.
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Aviation 94

Douglas
Full color 10" x 14" ad for what Flying can do for you, and if you are flying chances are you will travel on a Douglas DC-6. There are drawings that show that by Flying you can "Cheer your team to victory", you can go to "The best hunting in America", it will be possible to "Go home for the holidays", you can have "A big time in the big city" and you and your family can "Visit summer this winter". The text calls it the "World's most Modern Airplane" and says that 79% of the Douglas production is for the military but there are new DC-6s being built for the airlines too. They also make the claim that "Twice as many people fly Douglas as all other airplanes combined".
September 15, 1952
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 56

Douglas
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their DC-8 for which they claim that "Now with the DC-8, Douglas shrinks the world again!". There is a picture of the Earth from way up in space with the jet trail of a plane circling the globe. The ad shows a closer view of this plane and the text begins "For 34 years, ever since Douglas planes were the first to gird the globe, it has been a Douglas tradition to make your world smaller". The text talks a little about what it is capable of but talks more about what it will do for you.
October 6, 1958
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 64

Douglas
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their DC-8. There is a large picture of this plane from the view that most people saw it, flying overhead, plus there is a picture of the stars in the sky which is called the "Kingdom of the DC-8". The text discusses the comfort that all passengers will ride in, the speed attainable, some of the features available to passengers and gives a list of airlines that have already purchased DC-8s.
June 1959
Holiday &
June 8, 1959
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Aviation 43

Douglas
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the comfort of flying on a DC-8. There is a picture of a family of three taking a flight on one of these Jetliners and they are occupying a row of three seats. The father, on the aisle, is starting to doze off as he holds several books on his lap and the mother and child, both under blankets, are fast asleep. The headline claims that "Tourists call it...(and so will you!) 'The world's most comfortable jetliner!'". The text includes positive comments from flyers of this plane and describes some of the joys of this jetliner. The ad also includes a list of airlines that have chosen to fly the DC-8.
October 19, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 57

Douglas
Full color 10" x 14" ad for their DC-8 Jetliner. There is a view from the side of one of these marvels in the air and another drawing of the interior of one in flight with two passengers looking into each other's eyes as they compare treasures from their vacation. Other passengers are sleeping or getting up to move around as the headline says that "Vacationers call it...(and so will you!) 'The world's most enjoyable jetliner!" while the text gives quotes from satisfied customers and a long list of airlines that were using this airline. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 50

Douglas
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for their DC-8 Jetliner and how "Engineers call it...(and so will you!) "The world's most advanced jetliner!" There is a drawing at the bottom of the page that shows a uniformed member of the crew pointing out something iln the engine to two suited travelers paying close attention. The ad then goes into details about what Flight Engineers have to say about this plane. The "most advanced noise suppressors to date", "cabin air refreshed every three minutes" and "so stable in flight, it's like resting at home". They also claim that many of the other features will jump out at you, individual reading lights that follow you in any seat position, more headroom and legroom, wide aisles and large windows in both first-class and tourist sections and, that long-famous Douglas feature, peace of mind.
May 1960
Holiday magazine
1
$7.50
View
Aviation 107

Eastern
Full color 8 1/2" x 12" ad urging you to consider flying with Eastern to a warm weather destination this winter. The headline says that you are "Only hours away from winter. The Second Summer" and there are several small pictures of bathing suit activities you could be enjoying while the snow flies in your hometown. The text mentions the Bahamas, Miami, Puerto Rico and Mexico as destinations and gives information about each location. The text also talks about Eastern's Charge-A-Trip to enable you to charge your trip.
January 1968
Better Homes & Gardens
1
$7.50
View Aviation 101

F-106
Full color 10 3/4" x 7 1/4" photo of two of these planes flying in tight formation above the clouds.
October 1975
Airman
1
$7.00
View Aviation 71

Fan Jet Falcon
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for this Business Jet available from a division of Pan Am. There is a large picture of this plane sitting on a landing strip and smaller pictures of a businessman looking off to his left, a Fan Jet Falcon taking off from an airstrip and a group of businessmen who have been able to quickly gather due to the availability of their Fan Jet Falcon. The headline claims that "In 3 1/2 hours, this baby paid for itself" and the text talks about how successful, large businesses benefit from being able to travel to many places in as short a time as possible. They call it the very best business jet in its class and urge you to stop having to make reservations for your people.
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Aviation 92

Garrett
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their TPR 331Turboprop airplane engines. There is a picture of an Aero Commander coming toward the camera as it is taking off from a rock-covered field and the headline claims that "Our turboprops are tough engines for tough birds". The text talks about some of the benefits of flying a plane equipped with this ingine and urges you to try one and see for yourself.
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Aviation 91

Hansa
Full color 9" x 12 1/2" ad for their Business Jets. There is a photo of one of these German jets flying over the Statue of Liberty while the headline calls it "The New Shape in Business Aviation". They describe it as Fast-Safe-Roomy-Comfortable-Economical and the text gives more details about the features , the servicce and it's construction.
December 1967
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 98

Interstate
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12" ad that mentions their new plane, the L-6. The ad has a picture of two people with binoculars looking at this plane flying overhead and the ad has the headline "Attention: Aircraft Spotters! There's a friendly stranger in the sky". The ad talks about it's use by the United States Navy and describes the speed with which they first built this plane and the other parts and equipment Interstate is contributing to the war effort. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
May 31, 1943
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Wartime / Aviation

Japan Air Lines
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad has a series of photos of scenery around the world and of a Japanese lady wearing a kimono trying to instruct a western male in how to use chopsticks. The ad headline encourages you to "Enjoy the unique pleasures of Japan. All the way round the world."
May 1968
National Geographic
1
$7.50
View Aviation 26

Japan Air Lines
Full color 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that wants to convince you just how well you are treated when you fly on Japan Air Lines. The ad headline claims that "We don't economize in Economy" and the ad has a picture of the kind of food that you would be served. The ad lists many of the features of their Economy such as a five-course meal, in-flight slippers, individual tooth brushes and many other items. The ad contains a coupon that you could mail in to get more information.
May 7, 1973
Sports Illustrated
1
$7.50
View Aviation 34

KC-10 Extender
Full color 10 3/4" x 7 3/4" photo of this McDonnel Douglas three engine tnaker that has received plenty of use.
April 1981
Airman
1
$7.00
View Aviation 70

Lockheed
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that show two Lockheed planes flying in the air very near to each other. The trade plane is flying closer to us and is white with a red horizontal stripe on it. The bomber is flying a little bit away but it is a decorated bomber, complete with camo paint. The headline under the photo says "Transports for Trade and bombers for Democracy Look to Lockheed for leadership in both". It then gives their location, "Lockheed Aircraft Corporation * Burbank, California".
December 25, 1939
Life magazine
1
$8.50
View
Aviation 103

Lockheed
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a drawing of a Lockheed Hudson marked with camo paint and RAF markings as it flies over an ocean scene. The ad headline encourages the reader to "Talk Lockheed with an R.A.F. Pilot". This Prewar ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 10, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 17

Lockheed
Full color 10" x 13" ad for Pre-war Lockheed. The ad headline proclaims "Wings of peace...on missions of war" and shows a Lodestar flying over a waterfall in South Africa.
September 29, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 7

Lockheed
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad with a drawing of several Vega Ventura planes flying overhead. The ad headline introduces "'Ventura' - The Hudson's brother in defense" and the text gives a quick history of this plane. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view..
October 27, 1941
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 19

Lockheed
Black and white 10" x 14" ad for their Constellation airplanes which are "Now in Service!". There is a picture of one flying overhead and the claim is made that it is "Hours quicker coast-to-coast, Latin America, Europe, Asia!". The ad mentions some of the many records this plane has set for fastest time from one location to another and the text claims that "No transport in service today comes even close to matching the Constellation's greater speed, greater comfort, greater safety". It also mentions that the Constellation was in use by American Airlines, Pan American and TWA at this time while Eastern Air Lines, Panagra Air France, KLM and KNILMI were about to switch over.
April 1946
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Aviation 65

Lockheed
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for their Lockheed Constellation. The ad has a drawing of a Constellation flying high over the skyline of London. The ad headline calls this plane "The Leader to London - The Leader at Home". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 21, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 20

Lockheed
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the dependability of their Lockheed Constellation. The ad has a picture of an airport where the men in the tower are watching a Constellation being loaded with passengers in preparation for takeoff. The ad headline makes the claim that "Every 80 minutes a Lockheed Constellation sets a new record for dependability!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
August 20, 1951
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 30

Lockheed
Full color 10" x 13" ad for their Super Constellation airplane. The ad has a picture of a Super Constellation in flight and a headline that claims "With World Airlines...it's Super Constellation 4 to 1" and there is a map of the world that show the 18 different airlines that have already ordered one of these planes. The ad also gives some specifications and descriptions for this plane. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 5, 1953
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 35

Lockheed
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad has a cutaway drawing of the Super Constellation Model 1049G. The ad headline describes this plane as having "All the Speed...and Quiet Comfort, too!". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
June 27, 1955
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 18

Lockheed
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad with a cutaway drawing of their Super Constellation Model 1049G. The ad headline claims this plane has "All the Speed...and Quiet Comfort, too!" and mentions the 18 world airlines that are now using this plane. This is a smaller version of another ad on this page.
August 1955
National Geographic
0
$8.00
View Aviation 29

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Lockheed
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their Hercules C-130 Transport. The picture shows the plane flying along followed by several parachutes safely dropping up to 25,000 pounds of combat cargo to a precise location. The text explains that previously the biggest problem with dropping emergency supplies was the wide range that it all landed. With this plane the entire load of supplies can be dropped in a matter of seconds assuring a smaller area in which to look for your equipment. The text also claims that this plane has 19 times the power that the transports used in World War II had assuring deliveries faster, farther and more economically.
December 1955
Fortune
1
$8.00
View Aviation 89

Lockheed
Black and white 10" x 14" ad with Lowell Thomas. The ad has a picture of this famous newsman sitting at a small table reading in front of a huge map of the world. The headline introduces him as "Mr. Lowell Thomas: One of the World's great clock watchers" and the text talks about having written 48 books while flying 40,000 miles each year. The text claims that his choice of planes to fly on is the Lockheed Super Constellation as many other worldly travelers do. It mentions some of the features that passengers will enjoy and talks about his new film, Search for Shangri-La. This ad also announces the coming Lockheed Luxury Liner, the Model 1649. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation / L. Thomas

Lockheed
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Dash 8 Jetstar Business Jet. There is a large picture of one landing and a smaller picture of one taken from overhead of one in flight. The headline calls it "The jet for all seasons" and the text explains that this plane does not "have to sit out a storm". It talks about its safety for landing due to its thrust reversers which can be seen in action in the large picture in the ad. It continues by talking about other features that will make your flights safe and the comfort of the executive cabin with six-foot headroom. With all these comfort and safety features it also features a cruising speed of 570 mph.
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Aviation 95

Lufthansa
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for this German Airline. The ad has a large, close-up photo of the Mona Lisa and the text talks about some of their low-cost tours of Europe. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 20, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 23

Lufthansa
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that urges you to use their airline to travel to Germany. There is a photo of an attractive, buxom young waitress bringing a large mug of beer to a customer and the headline says that when you travel to Germany "You're as likely to see a Munich girl in an old-fashioned dirndl dress as a mini-skirt. Any objections?". The text explains what the dirndl is and lists several other attractions that can be seen and enjoyed when you travel to Munich. The ad also includes small pictures of The Moselle and one of the many famous Clocks that grace the streets of Munich.
April 19, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation / Germany

Luscombe
Three color 4 3/4" x 13 1/2" ad for their All-Metal Silvaire planes. There is a picture of one of these planes parked on a grassy field at the edge of what could be several houses. There are several couples standing and talking while holding small luggage bags and the headline claims this plane can "Turn Travel Time into Fun Time". The text talks about turning the time spent getting to and from your favorite vacation spot into a part of the vacation and claims these economical, reliable planes can make it possible. They speak first of the Silvaire De Luxe which has a cruising speed of 112 mph, a 600-mile range and a Safety-Zone cabin. It then mentions the Silvaire Standard which had a 65-horsepower engine and could be purchased with a down-payment as low as $996. Near the bottom of the ad is a picture of a Mrs. T.C. McNeil, Jr. with comments about the good results she has had while piloting one of these planes.
April 1947
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Aviation 83

Martin
Full color 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad which has a drawing of a 2-0-2 Airliner and a lady holding a pen in her hand as she looks at a photograph of her man. She is wondering if there will be time for him to come home for the holiday and the ad headline answers that "Yes! The airlines gain you Time...Time...Time!"
January 19, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 16

North American Aviation
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad that reminded the American public just what part that the North American Aviation company was playing in helping defeat the forces from Japan and Germany by showing a copy of a letter that was supposedly sent to Dr. Goebbels c/o Adolph Hitler. The letter mentions the P-51 Mustangs in the battle over Dieppe, the B-25s sinking the first Nazi U-Boat, B-25s making the first raid on a Japanese position in the Philippines and the B-25 raid led by Jimmie Doolittle to bomb Tokyo. It continues by talking about how fast the North American company is able to turn out more and more of these effective weapons.
November 16, 1942
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Aviation 67

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North American Aviation
Full color 7 3/4" x 11" ad that highlights another of the many ways that the North American Aviation company is contributing to the effort to beat the Axis forces. The ad mentions two of the more widely-known planes produced by North American that were meeting with huge success in the actual battles, the P-51 Mustang and the B-25 Mitchell, but this ad talks about the AT-6 Texan, the most widely used combat trainer in the war. The ad claims that the "Pilots of 24 Nations train in "Texans"" and the left and right side of the ad are lined with the wing insignias of these countries. The ad claims that North American has built over 10,000 of these trainers, believed to be a record, and claims that they have designed in the same instrumentation for all three of their planes so, someone trained in the Texan will comfortably switch to either of the other two planes and be immediately successful. The ad has a drawing of a squadron of five of these planes "peeling off" as they train for duty. As all of their ads do, this one reminds us that "North American Sets the Pace!".
September 1943
Good Housekeeping
0
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View Aviation / Wartime ad

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North American Aviation
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that contains a drawing by Reynold Besswell of a victorious P-51 Mustang flying away from an enemy plane that is spiraling out of control in the background as flames burn on the right wing. The ad headline reassures us that "Mustangs Raise Hell in Heavens". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad are not visible in the scanned view.
March 13, 1944
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Wartime / Aviation

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North American
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about the B-25 Mitchell Bomber. There is a painting of this plane attacking the enemy with guns blazing from every possible angle while the headline calls it a "15-gun salute from American Flyers". The lower picture shows a cutaway view of this plane and the location and functions of it's 5-man crew.. The text tells that it is being used againstGermany and Japan and that it has 6000 design improvements over the planes that General Doolittle took over Tokyo.
May 8, 1944
Life magazine
0
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View Aviation / Wartime

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North American Aviation
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the P-51 Mustang. At the top of the ad is a drawing by Reynold Jones showing a worried mother looking upward with a P-51 Mustang in the background. The ad headline describes this plane as the "Star of Hope for American Mothers". The bottom of the ad is devoted to a drawing of the plane with notations of each of it's features and mentioning it's speed, ceiling and radius of action. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 1944
McCall's
1
$8.00
View Aviation / Wartime

North American Aviation
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that uses the P-51 Mustang to convince the readers that "North American Aviation sets the Pace". The ad has a drawing of two members of the ground crew loading fresh .50 calibre machine gun belts onto the wing guns of a P-51. Below this picture is a cutaway schematic that show many of the features that made this plane popular with Allied pilots and an object of fear to the enemy. The ad headline claims that "This Peace Talk Makes Sense". This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
September 4, 1944
Life magazine
0
$8.00
View Aviation 32

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North American
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that talks about another of the exploits of one of their products, the B-25 Mitchell Bomber, during World War II. The drawing in the ad shows a single B-25 pulling up after dropping bombs on a bridge that is filled with enemy tanks. The text tells how the waist gunner had to call the captain on the intercom and inform him that it would be necessary to "Take her up a bit, Captain, we're shipping water back here". It attributes this experience to the Skull and Wing Squadron in Burma which it claims was called the Burma Dental Clinic with "Bridge Busting our Specialty". The bottom picture explains the technique of skip-bombing which these planes were capable of doing with great ease and the skills of experienced pilots. At the very bottom of the ad it mentions "Planes That Make Headlines" including the P-51 Mustang Fighter, the B-25 and PBJ Mitchell Bomber and the AT-6 and SNJ Texan Combat Trainer.
February 5, 1945
Life magazine
0
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View Aviation 79

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North American Aviation
Black and white 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" ad for how their ideas are changing the world. The ad has a picture of two young boys in pajamas are sitting wide-eyed staring intently at, what the ad explains is, their first non-local television program. The ad headline calls it "The night the whole world changed for Pekka and Jussi" and talks about the satellites that are bouncing program signals around the world and mentions some of the other ways that North American Aviation is changing our world and making us safer.
December 6, 1963
Time magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 40

North American Rockwell
Black and white 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their incomparable Sabreliner. The headline claims that "it carries more people at faster speeds for longer distances at higher altitudes from shorter runways with lower costs than any other aircraft - piston, turboprop or jet." The text calls it "the only twinjet certificated to 45,000' with passengers" and offers a 3 year/2000 hour warranty. It mentions a cruising speed of 560 which is smiliar to other business jets but claims that the Sabreliner has a balanced combination of speed, range/payload performance and operating economy.
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Aviation 96

Panagra
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for the airline also known as Pan American Grace Airways. The ad has pictures of a travel agent showing a map of South America to a family, a view of a plane and several locations and the sites to be seen there. The ad headline mentions "3 Skyway Cruises to South America" and gives their destinations as well as the number of days that the trips last.
February 1941
National Geographic
1
$8.00
View Aviation 25

Panagra
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for this airline company. The ad headline claims that "You haven't seen anything 'til you've seen South America and for only $87 down payment from New York". The ad mentions Pan American Airline in the text. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Aviation 21

Pan American World Airways
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the fact that the entire world is at your feet when you fly with Pan American. The headline says "Pick any continent you choose" and shows a blue ribbon with six different flowers placed in front ot it. There is the Tulip which is for Europe, the Protea which is for Africa, the Lotus which is for Asia, the Acacia for Australia, the Forget-Me-Not for Alaska and the Orchid which designates South America. The text continues by claiming that "Only Pan American flies to all 6" and that "month after month, Twice as Many People fly abroad by Pan American World Airways than by all other U.S. airlines combined". They claim to be flying the "world's fastest and most luxurious airplanes", mentioning the double-decked Clipper "America" and call themselves the "World's most experienced airline".
February 1949
Holiday
1
$8.00
View Aviation 60

Pan American
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for Travel to Europe. The ad headline is "Wedding Anniversary in Paris" and the ad contains several photos of the experiences that Pat Dutcher and her husband had while visiting there. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
April 4, 1953
Saturday Evening Post
1
$8.00
View Aviation 22

Pan American
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that talks about how comfortable you will be in your Own Private Stateroom on your trip to Europe. They called them the President Staterooms and the ad has several drawings that show how the statesroom can convert from a living room to a dining room and finally to a bedroom. Mention is made of some of the fancy meals that are offered and a surcharge of $135 for a double occupancy is promised. The captions under each drawing offer descriptions of the setting being shown.
September 1954
Holiday
1
$8.00
View
Aviation 100

Pan American
Full color 10" x 14" ad that tells the story of "How Peter Pan flew to Paris". There is a drawing of Mary Martin, who originally played Peter Pan, talking with someone in an aviation uniform and the man is saluting her. The ad has her saying "Thank you, captain, for a wonderful, wonderful flight" as she had completed her flight to Paris. The ad talks about some of the specials you will receive on The President Special and claims that you will receive the same kind of service on their thrifty Rainbow services. They say these flights were only $52 down and you could unvest in their "Pay Later" Plan.
January 9, 1956
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Aviation 104

Pan American
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for travel to Europe on a Pan American Clipper. There is a picture of a member of the crew of one of these planes checking on the welfare of a mother and her young daughter who are comfortably sleeping in the First-Class section. The headline promises that "Europe is only a dream away - when Uncle Sam's your skipper" and the caption talks about Sleeperette service with berths being only $55 extra. The reference to Uncle Sam being your skipper in the headline is explained in the text when the claim is made that "Pan American meets Uncle Sam's strictest rules of airline operation with a generous margin to spare". The text also mentions that other airlines may travel to Europe but Pan American specializes in it.
April 30, 1956
Life magazine
2
$7.50
View Aviation 46

Pan American
Full color 10" x 14" ad drawn by Norman Rockwell that tries to assure you of the safety you will have in one of their Clipper flights due to the experience of their pilots. There is a drawing by Rockwell of Master Pilot John Mattis of Pan American being stared at with awe by a young boy who is carrying a PAA carry-on bag. The headline tells us that the pilot has "Eyes that see around the world" and the text talks about the number of over-ocean flights these pilots have made, the number of qualified pilots that will be on each flight, the number of on-the-ground employees Pan Am uses to make everyone safe and the number of offices they have around the world. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 12, 1956
Life magazine
0
$9.00
View Aviation / Rockwell

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Pan American
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for the places that their Clipper can take you. There is a picture of several couples relaxing on a warm and sandy beach and the headline assures you that "The quickest way to Summer is the Clipper Carpet". They offer hundreds of Clipper flights, many of them to places that will put you in a warm location with 73 weekly services sheduled to Hawaii. The caption under the picture mentions three different flights and the low amount of money that you would have to put down, $10 to $25. There is an overhead drawing of one of these planes parked on the runway with a line of people walking along the blue carpet and up the boarding stairs.
February 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 90

Pan American
Black and white 10" x 13" ad talks about "The Hush of Speed - across the Atlantic by Jet Clipper". The ad has a photo of the Boeing 707 that is used and describes in great detail the advantages of this plane and the services provided by Pan American. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
December 25, 1958
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 3

Pan American
Full color 9 1/2" x 12" ad for the comfort and speed experienced on their Jet Clippers. The ad has a picture of a group of comfortable passengers milling around this spacious plane as it flies across the Atlantic. These people are using the First Class Lounge to read or talk as they wait for the stewardess who is coming down the aisle with something on a tray. The ad headline claims you will be "Halfway to Europe between cocktails and coffee" and the text talks about, among other things, an Economy Class round trip flight to Europe at prices starting at $453.60. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 13, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 44

Pan Am
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the fact that they have now added flights across the Pacific. Under a photo of a line of passengers boarding a shiny Jet Clipper on a sunny day is the headline informing us that you can "Now fly Pan Am Jet Clippers across the Pacific...as well as to Europe...and to South America". The text highlights their "Jets to Hawaii and Tokyo", their "Jets direct to 11 European Cities" as well as their "Jets to Caracas and Buenos Aires". The text contains more information about travel to these locations and the ad has a picture of a Pan Am Jet Clipper supposedly in flight.
December 28, 1959
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 78

Pan Am
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Flights to the North American Tropical Islands. The headline, under a picture that shows a scene from a beach on the Caribbean, claims that "Only your dreams get you there faster...Pan Am Jets - fastest by far to Bermuda, Nassau and the Caribbean". A little chart in the ad shows the time a flight from either New York or Miami would take to arrive in Bermuda, Nassau, San Juan, Dominican Republic and to Jamaica. The text also talks about using their Super 7 Clippers to fly into these destinations from either San Francisco or Los Angeles.
February 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 69

Pan Am
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for their South American vacations. There is a large picture of Arequipa, Peru and two smaller pictures, one showing a Rio de Janeiro beach while the other shows people boarding a plane in New York. The headline urges you to "Get a Jet start to a South American vacation...with twice as many memories" and the text describes Pan Am Holiday #713 which was a 21-day tour down one side of South America and up the other for only $955.50 with only a $96 down payment. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
March 1960
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 48

Pan Am
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for their Jet Flights to Europe and Back. The ad has a picture of the tail of a Pan Am Jet standing tall with the American flag afixed to it and the headline claiming flights "As low as $298 to Europe and back by Pan Am Jet" with the assurances that "...you're in U.S. hands all the way!". There is also a chart that gives "Typical new 17-Day Round-Trip Jet Economy Excursion Fares" for flights from Boston-Shannon, New York-London, Balt./Wash.-Paris, Detroit-London, Chicago-London and West Coast-London.
August 29, 1960
Life magfazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 77

Pan Am
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for some of the places you can go if you choose to fly with Pan Am. The ad has a picture of a sunny tropical beach where a couple is sitting quietly under an umbrella made of palm leaves. The husband, who is reading, has a suitcase and a bag from Pan Am next to him and the headline claims that "Pan Am travelers get 10 sunny islands for the price of one". The text lists the 10 different islands that you could travel to from New York for the round trip price of $319. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 2, 1962
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 42

Pan Am
Full color 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad that brags about how Special this airline is. There is a picture of the tail end of one of their Boeing jets with the Pan Am insignia emblazoned on the tail. The headline says that "The jet is fairly common. The airline is one of a kind." and the text discusses the facts that make this so. They talk about being the most experienced airline and that a Pan Am Jet Clipper can be boarded in any one of 17 cities in the U.S.A. and fly to any one of 83 countries around the world.
April 2, 1965
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Aviation 99

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Pan Am
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that says "They asked for a city. We gave them a continent". The picture in the ad shows a well-dressed couple standing next to a fountain with several places that water is running out from as a carriage with an attentive driver is waiting for them. The ad says they are in Rome and, with the at least three story buildings and the Italian cars, I could not disagree. We are told that this week they are in Rome, last week they were in London and in Paris and then they will be flying to Nice then on to Barcelona and Lisbon. You may think that they are trying to spend Dad's inheritance but the ad tells us that they have discovered the Extra Cities Plan. You are able to visit 20 cities for the price of one and it has many delightful variations.
May 20, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View
Aviation 106

Piper
Black and white 5 1/4" x 13 1/2" ad which states that "Fairville Prepares for Post-War Flying" in this ad forPiper Cubs. I do not know if there is even a town named Fairville but the ad wants us to think so. Quoting the ad it says "After victory you can land in your peacetime Piper Cub at Fairville and countless other towns which are building landing facilities today. These communities are looking ahead to the coming air age - providing flying facilities for their sons and daughters upon their return from the Service - guaranteeing themselves a prosperous future". There is then a quote from the mayor of Fairville who says "Our landing area in Fairville is very modest - just a simple, straight sod strip. This is the sensible way to start - as long as there is ample room for expansion when air traffic warrants". It then mentions several booklets that your town or whatever should request. "What Your Town Needs For The Coming Air Age" as well as "Piper Cub...In War And In Peace" is another.
June 19, 1944
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Aviation 114

Piper
Full color 8" x 11" ad shows a yellow & red Piper parked on a beach. The headline asks the question "How a Ferris Wheel helped make Piper Cub the World's Most Popular Plane"
September 1946
Farm Journal
1
$8.00
View Aviation 1
Piper
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad for their Piper Navajo and the safety and benefits that this Executive Plane will provide. There is a picture of one of these planes flying high over some low mountains and rough terrain while the headline claims that "This Piper Navajo cruises 247 mph, can fly higher on one engine than any mountain in the Continental U.S., a doesn't cost a fortune." The text promises that you will be able to fly half way against the continent before you need to refuel and cruises at 26,000 feet. It mentions the "Dual Everything" on these planes which is pretty normal on decent planes and claims that it will cost you less than $100,000. It claims to be the right-sized airplane to be able to land at many of the smaller airports and urges you to try one now.
December 1967
Fortune
1
$7.50
View Aviation 93

Quantas
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad for the luxury airline from Australia. The picture shows an exotic and colorful meal that, according to the headline, is "the 1800-mile meal". The text describes in exquisite detail how you can expect to be treated on one of the luxury trips that Quantas was famous for and how fast the time will fly. This ad was really announcing the arrival of the 707 Jets which was due to happen later that year.
June 1959
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 85

Quantas
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad that brings attention to how far Quantas has come since they began 41 years before. There is a drawing of their original building on Duck Street in Longreach, Qneensland, an old wood building with a faded sign, a horse tied outside and a man leaning against the door jamb. They admit that "a covey of airlines have come along since" but they feel that seeing the original is something special, a solid sureness. They calim to be the "oldest, most knowing airline in the English-speaking world".
November 1962
Holiday
1
$7.50
View Aviation 87

Sabena
Black and white 9 1/2" x 14" ad for the "Newest Way to Fly to Paris!". The top picture shows a Douglas DC-7C leaving New York on it's way to Brussels and a second picture that shows a Sikorsky S-58 Helicopter making the short trip from Brussels to Paris. Another picture shows a map telling you of ten other European cities you can reach from Brussels by helicopter and talks about a total of 47 of the top tourist and business centers in Europe that Sabena services by the Radar-nosed Convair 440 "Metropolitan". The last picture talks about the Lady Sabena Club which any woman who makes a trans-Atlantic flight on Sabena is invited to join. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
February 18, 1957
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 47

Sabena
Full color 9 1/2" x 12 1/2" ad that wants to know "Why do well-traveled people travel Sabena". The ad claims that "People who go places find that Sabena's 3-speed fleet is going their way, at just the time they want. For instance: you make the first big jump by Boeing "International": jet on around Europe by Caravelle: slow down for the unique experience of "Flight-Seeing"...by helicopter. Next trip to Europe, Africa, the Middle East...fly Sabena. All the way, le service Belgique - c'est magnifique!".
March 1961
Holiday magazine
1
$7.50
View
Aviation 105

Stinson
Black and white 10" x 13" ad has the headline "The plane that flushed an idea from a hot-dog stand-". The text tells the story about how Eddie Stinson came up with the idea for a parking brake for planes. There is a drawing of the Stinson Voyager 150. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
January 14, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 9

Stinson
Black and white 10" x 14" ad that tells you that "You'll fly high, wide and handsome in the Stinson Voyager 150". There are three pictures of this plane, one in the air and two on the ground. The picture of it in the air mentions things such as it climbing at 770 feet per minute and has a service ceiling of 14,000 feet. The first view of one on the ground shows some people's house and the plane has parked by the front door. People are walking out of the house to join people standing next to the plane to take off. The other picture on the ground shows the plane sitting there while two men are there talking while their two horses wait. The ad says that these planes were available in blue-yellow and maroon-gray and could carry a useful load of 944 pounds.
April 22, 1946
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View
Aviation 113

Stinson
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13 1/2" ad for what they were calling their 21st Anniversary Stinson Station Wagon. There is a picture of several men loading newspapers from a truck into a Stinson airplane parked and waiting to begin its flight. The caption gives as an example of one of the many ways that progressive businessmen can benefit from using a Stinson airlplane in their business when it says that this man uses it for "rapid newspaper deliveries within a radium of 100 miles". The text begins with a general description of its capabilities before getting into more specific figures about useful load, cruising and top speed as well as a few more. It talks about some of the standart equipment and has a drawing of the Specially reinforced cargo compartment
July 21, 1947
Life magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 73

Stinson
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad that is intended to encourage business and professional men to "learn to fly with Stinson...Free!. The ad pictures the "New Stinson Flying Station Wagon for '48" and includes a coupon to mail in for information or a free demonstration.
February 16, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 5

Stinson
Black and white 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" ad talks about "Why more and more men over 40 are flying Stinsons for business and pleasure".
May 10, 1948
Time magazine
1
$8.00
View Aviation 12

TWA
Full color 6 1/4" x 9 1/2" ad for taking a Trans World Airlines flight to Paris, France. The ad has a photo of a Street Scene in Montmarte, Paris, France as well as a map showing the flights from the United States to Europe and Northern Africa. The ad headline promises that "You'll always remember Paris with it's captivating charms".
August 1952
National Geographic
0
$8.00
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TWA
Full color 10" x 13" ad that tries to give you the confidence to fly with TWA. The ad headline asks you to "Meet the team that saves you time and has a picture of three serious, mature gentlemen wearing pilot's uniforms walking away from a TWA airplane. The text talks about the StarStream airplane giving information about this plane that only they were flying. This ad is larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
November 2, 1962
Life magazine
0
$7.50
View Aviation 41

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United Air Lines
Full color 10" x 13 1/2" ad that tells us that the DC-8 is "The Jet with Extra Room...Extra Care". There is a picture of a lady relaxing at the back of a plane where she is fortunate to have no one sharing the seat next to her. She is scrunched over against the window next to her so that it seems that she has more than enough room. With the seat next to her being unoccupied she is able to spread her things out and it looks like she is flying alone on the plane. It is identified as being the United Air Lines DC-8 Jet Mainliner and says that it is a wonderful place for relaxing as you go places in a hurry.
April 9, 1960
Saturday Evening Post
1
$7.50
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Aviation 108

United Air Lines
Full color 10" x 13" ad for the airline that advertises The Friendly Skies. There is a picture of a couple floating peacefully on a pair of surfboards in a very quiet body of water with the caption saying "Let's get away from it all". The text talks about stamping out "dull vacations" and mentions some of the many places that United can take you to. It also talks about the United Personal Travel Credit Card that could be used to charge all of the items that were worked out with your travel agent.
April 19, 1968
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 62

Western Airlines
Black and white 9 1/2" x 13" ad for the airline that covered the West Coast of America. The headline asks "Isn't it 'in' to be western?" and answers with a positive "Completely". There are pictures of sights to be seen in the West and a map that shows the routes that this airline maintained. The text claims that they have "The finest jets. The snapiest service. The best on-time record" and if any other "best" categories come up, they will get them too.
April 15, 1966
Life magazine
1
$7.50
View Aviation 102

XSB2C-1
Full color 9 1/2" x 13" ad for Camel Cigarettes that has a photo of Test Pilot Bill Ward and several photos of the "Navy's new dive-bombing sensation" in action. This ad came from the back cover and has some worn in grime. The ad is also larger than my scanner bed so the outer edges of the ad will not be visible in the scanned view.
October 24, 1941
Life magazine
1
$6.00
View Camels / Aviation










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